How do Operators make money?


By BlackKnight3000

10 months ago


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  • Latest reply 10 months ago by Mike_M
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    #1 10 months ago

    I've been going to arcades since the early 70's when I was a kid and have seen the ups and downs of the industry. But what sucks now is that the new arcades I go to are nothing more than kid casinos. Some of them even have faux slot machines that payout in tickets!

    What I'm curious about is how do operators that run actual pinball and video game arcades sans redemption games, make money anymore? With pins costing upwards $10 grand, and some of the cockpit-style games costing much more, how in the hell do arcade operators make any profit?

    Yeah, I know the real money is made selling food/drink, but looking at some of these machines and I scratch my head how they're supposed to ever make back their original cost, let alone make a profit. Sure, with pins, operators can (I assume) run a machine for years, and then sell it on the collectors market and make some money, but that's not enough to pay rent and the light bill.

    I help run small local movie theater and our brand new projector and sound system cost us only $30k. That Star Wars Pod game costs $30k. How in the heck can it ever make it's money back one person at a time, even charging five bucks a person?

    Lastly, I think arcade games can indeed make a comeback. But in order to do that they will have to start making games that exceed what people can generally get at home with their X-boxes and PS4s. I sit down in some of these brand new racing games and I have to ask myself "did I just time travel to 1998?" Graphics for most arcade games today are just "Meh," IMHO.

    But, in the end, I'm still amazed, and happy that pinball has persisted. Mainly because it is one of the few real things left in this virtual world of ours. Plus, the ball is wild.

    #2 10 months ago

    Well in Germany, I think most of them don't. I go out about once a week with a friend of mine to play pinball in pubs, bowling alleys, pool halls, etc. There are two operators in my area who keep their games in good shape and they operate a mix of classic B/W and the newer sterns. Most pins in one location is 4, but usually just one.

    Now getting to the point: We live in one of the most densely areas of Europe, the Ruhr Area and yet when we go to our hang-outs, we practically never have to wait to play, even if the bars are absolutely packed. For example, there is a bar with RS, TAF, Corvette and Baywatch. We've been there about six times and I've tried to give them some publicity on Facebook and the German forums yet when we go to that bar, we are the only ones who went there to play pinball. The regulars might play a couple of games over the whole night, but that's about it. Very often we are the only people who played during the whole night. When you consider that you pay both VAT and income tax on the coin take, PLUS a shitty pinball tax, which is charged per game and regardless of income, I can only assume that the operators (Thanks Micha, Thanks Sven, do it out of the kindness of their hearts).

    #4 10 months ago

    There are many different ways if you can prove good #s for locations. One way being rev shares. Company supplies you with the game and pays for all parts / you supply the location and manpower. You need to show at least 800 per month per piece for them to even consider you.

    #5 10 months ago
    Quoted from BlackKnight3000:

    I sit down in some of these brand new racing games and I have to ask myself "did I just time travel to 1998?" Graphics for most arcade games today are just "Meh," IMHO.

    My buddy bought a full on raceing simulator for 1600 dollars. Built a frame and put a car seat on the frame. Bought an x box with forza or any other raceing game. The whole setup prob cost him 2200 dollars including paying someone to weld up a frame. I almost guarentee that its cheaper than a brand new raceing game and a hell of a lot better graphics and physics.

    Its really crazy how the graphics of some of those raceing games havent changed but yet you can build your own setup with way better quality graphics and and simulator for a hell of alot cheaper.

    #6 10 months ago

    You answered your own question here:

    "But in order to do that they will have to start making games that exceed what people can generally get at home with their X-boxes and PS4s"

    Back in the day, when arcades ruled, there were no such distractions but things like home consoles killed the arcade.

    #7 10 months ago

    A lot has changed with the times, I think the problem today is too many choices, and a lot of personal entertainment sucks away from location play. Gaming consoles, smart phones, home theater, etc., is keeping a lot of folks out of arcades and movie theaters. We all know this is what basically killed most arcades, pinball on location and drive-in movie theaters.

    I just think that sometimes folks get bored with handheld attention and sitting around at home. Retro barcades are attracting attention, movie theaters are approaching new ways to lure in customers such as dine-in, cocktails, and giant electric recliners. I just saw a movie in the theater last night as a matter-of-fact. The cinema with the giant electric recliners gets my business and it's a lot further to travel to. I just get uncomfortable quickly in standard seating these days.

    I think businesses based around vids, pins or movies alone is a real struggle, and finding novel ways to lure customers in is a great way to gain profitability. Certainly combining alcohol with any of these activities is one way to drag people in, but perhaps other new niche markets can be found.

    #8 10 months ago

    I've been an operator for almost 13 years. I started my company at 19 years old. You dont make money. I worked a full time job up untill about 4 years ago along with my route. I constantly put every quarter back into paying the bills on machines. Its constant, never ending payments. There are a few things that will help you survive & keep pushing in coin-op. You have to love it, absolutely love it. Every account isnt going to be a homerun, but having a couple will definitely help ease things. You have to constantly try to reinvent your services. A couple years into doing it I saw cd jukeboxes were dying & internet based was gonna be the norm. Also I started doing ATM machines. 2 years ago I started my first standalone arcade featuring not just video, you'd be dead in the water. I offer ticket games, cranes, video, pool, air hockey, & pins. Last yr I took over another vendor's route so once less guy in town helped. Coin-op isnt all negative, trust me i adore it greatly. Pinball is probably the most matience & most expensive investment when looking for a return on investment, but like with all coin-op the game is eventually paid for, even if its just 1 quarter or dollar at a time

    #9 10 months ago

    I have asked myself the same questions. How the hell can this machine pay for itself. I'm born in the early 80s so naturally the 90s were my playing field. I've seen flyers in Sweden for new Sega Rally machines that cost 130000 SEK (about $14500) in 1994 which naturally is crazy expensive. However, as you said, the arcade games were the driving force of graphical development and gameplay in the 80s and 90s until computers and home entertainment surpassed it.

    Many operators have several games on route which circulate which can keep locations fresh even though they don't buy new machines all the time. But today, I would say the games are there to get the customers in, and then you make a profit on things around them. Food, drinks, merchandise and so on. Arcade machines are not the primary income any longer. At least, that's my guess.

    EDIT: I'd also like to point out that you need a permit since 1982 to be an operator in Sweden. It's costly and also a pain in the ass to handle the administration since every machine you buy, sell or change needs to be reported. We're trying to get it abolished.

    #10 10 months ago

    buy machine on the books. site it for a month or two. take a lot of photos to prove you own it. then sell it to a hobbyist on the sly for cash at nearly the full price you paid and continue to claim tax depreciation for it on tax return for the next 9 years

    #11 10 months ago
    Quoted from wiredoug:

    buy machine on the books. site it for a month or two. take a lot of photos to prove you own it. then sell it to a hobbyist for cash at nearly the full price you paid on the side and continue to claim tax depreciation for it on tax return for the next 9 years

    Exhibit A, Your Honour, lol.

    #12 10 months ago
    Quoted from TimeBandit:

    Exhibit A, Your Honour, lol.

    hey i didnt name anyone.. but it rings more than one bell doesnt it

    #13 10 months ago

    In W. PA Distributors have a boat load of video poker machines that make their money for them! Also a several of them are in the ATM business, you know when you go to that place that charges $5 fee to use the ATM and then your bank also charges a fee???

    #14 10 months ago

    It's tough, and varies by city/region, ya'know, that whole population density thing. If you have machines that can draw people in to a location and make the profits off of food and booze sales its a plausible business model in many cases. But that's not the classic operator scenario. In my case, I have some friends that own a brewery, I supply a gameroom with no rent or money split, I run leagues and tournaments, they make waaaay more off of beer sales than they would have made off a split of the take, they don't have to mess with maintaining machines, I get to expand my hobby to an absurd level, and I get tax deductions. I was probably going to buy the machines anyway and in this (admittedly very unusual) case there's an operator and a location that mutually benefits from the situation.

    Disclaimer, I have a well paying day job and can afford to do this as a labor of love. If I was depending on this to live off of I'd be living under an overpass. That being said, I have a friend that operates a local retro bar/arcade (Pints & Pixels) and he seems to be doing well. But he made his money in an internet based company and semi-retired to run the bar/arcade and he makes his money off of beer and food sales I suspect. Once again, a labor of love.

    #15 10 months ago

    By selling popcorn for $7.50 a bucket and movie passes for $10.

    Seriously, I doubt our arcades make much if anything, it's used as a marketing or draw to get you into a movie seat.

    Chris Kruger

    #16 10 months ago

    Not sure if this answers your question, but it seems to me that the beercade/barcade movement seems to do well by offering something that makes them stand out against other bars. There's also the Tilt Ice Cream bars, which is basically again positioning yourself as a location with a unique combination of products. Some of the pinball museums are doing well too. There must be other examples too. I'm actually thinking of starting a series of articles in pinball Magazine about succesful ways to operate pinball in combination with something else to stand out.

    #17 10 months ago
    Quoted from BlackKnight3000:

    I sit down in some of these brand new racing games and I have to ask myself "did I just time travel to 1998?"

    Great points, I have often thought the same thing.

    I also have noticed the size of the new arcade games. They are huge, and often are now in big enclosures or "Pods". Most of the newer arcades are either shooter games or car and motorcycle racing games that take up a large space. It would be great if they would start making average size cabinets again. I remember growing up and my local 7-11 always had 4 arcade games they would rotate tucked in the corner of the store. They did not take up much space and they were classic titles like Toobin, Cyberball, Ivan Stewart's Off Road, 720, Paperboy, Contra, etc.

    I think if arcade games were average size again and priced right, then more locations would consider them again. They are just getting too big and expensive to generate a profit unless you have a crazy high traffic location. I would not mind putting a pinball machine/s on location but I hesitate because I have yet to think of a location that would get enough traffic to justify or make a profit. Here we have barcades, bars and bowling alley's. I was at our local bowling alley the other night and there were 10+ Pins there including the new Hobbit. I was there for several hours at night during peak hours and not one person besides myself played any of the pinball machines. The only place I can think of that would be successful besides a busy barcade is maybe somewhere were people have to wait and have nothing else to do, like at an Airport near terminals? I would be interested in hearing about any locations that actually turn a profit beside a busy barcade?

    Inflation has helped with the decline of arcade games on location. People still think games should be $.25 or $.50 a game. It is difficult for operators to make money when game cost have gone way up but pricing to play has stayed relatively the same.

    #18 10 months ago

    You already answered your question, they make money by running kiddie casinos and redemption machines, not pinball machines.

    #19 10 months ago
    Quoted from pinmister:

    Inflation has helped with the decline of arcade games on location. People still think games should be $.25 or $.50 a game. It is difficult for operators to make money when game cost have gone way up but pricing to play has stayed relatively the same.

    Agree, but I don't want to pay 10SEK (1 USD) for 1 credit when in Germany they run 1 euro (about the same as 10 SEK) for 3 credits.
    I would spend a lot more money in a machine in total over an hour if I just got more credits.

    #20 10 months ago
    Quoted from unigroove:

    Not sure if this answers your question, but it seems to me that the beercade/barcade movement seems to do well by offering something that makes them stand out against other bars. There's also the Tilt Ice Cream bars, which is basically again positioning yourself as a location with a unique combination of products. Some of the pinball museums are doing well too. There must be other examples too. I'm actually thinking of starting a series of articles in pinball Magazine about succesful ways to operate pinball in combination with something else to stand out.

    Jonathan - you should have a look at a very unique place in Newcastle Australia - "Pizza & Pinball".

    I don't need to explain the place further - I truly and firmly believe it is a business that could easily be franchised and have said this to the owners many times over many years.

    Dad walks in with son (or not) - orders a pizza and has NOTHING to do for 15 minutes. Hey look at all these pinball machines......

    25
    #21 10 months ago
    Quoted from Homepin:

    Dad walks in with son (or not) - orders a pizza and has NOTHING to do for 15 minutes.

    2017 version: Then they both sit down and stare at their phones for 15 minutes and don't talk to each other.

    #22 10 months ago
    Quoted from frolic:

    2017 version: Then they both sit down and stare at their phones for 15 minutes and don't talk to each other.

    Well you would think so but that isn't what happens here. The place thrives and I can think of a dozen ways to help it along.

    'Pizza & Pinball $20' (hand the customer a token when he orders) - suddenly they are playing the pinball machines and very likely putting more coin into them.

    This is what happens - well it did when I visited.

    Another option is to install a phone blocker - prevents "moron phone syndrome"

    #23 10 months ago
    Quoted from Homepin:

    Dad walks in with son (or not) - orders a pizza and has NOTHING to do for 15 minutes.

    Yeah, I'm afraid that this bit is just not true anymore. If there is only one person doing the pickup, they are phone surfing for sure.

    #24 10 months ago

    if they are JUST pinball operators they do it for the love and money all goes back into the games.

    Reality is that around here, the traditional operators make money on gambling games under the table.
    The real money will always be in beer and food sales.

    There is a reason you barely see any dedicated pinball places and when you do, they are in densly populated areas and tend to be the barcade style.

    Video games killed pinball (vids take almost no effort ot maintain and bring in quarters in a shorter duration game)
    Home games killed the arcade (people seem to fear the world and would rather stay at home and play online with other people)

    The recent operator resurgance IME is 100% hobby collectors that are trying to keep the silver ball alive. Hell, in our town we started putting our personal games out 4 years ago and now there are 3 other guys/companies actively trying to make the numbers work on starting barcades and I have been contacted by atleast 3 other bar owners that also want to tap into that idea. From my POV there is no way I would stake my personal livelyhood on pinball or a barcade. It is too much instability and unpredictibility. I also think you need a town of 500k at absoulte minimum to make a go at it and you had better have damn good food and beer alongside the pins. Thus far nobody has started one in Madison, but I get the impression there will be atleast 2 people trying it in the next year. 24 months after that I predict only 1 of them will be alive.

    To really do it, you will also need skeeball and the sit down acrades that people seem to love.

    Good luck to anyone willing to do it! I will surely stop by and put quarters in your games if I come through your town

    #25 10 months ago
    Quoted from pinmister:

    I think if arcade games were average size again and priced right, then more locations would consider them again. T

    Arcade games are in huge pods and enclosures so they can offer what a console doesn't. Up until the Saturn/64/Playstation era arcade games had massive advantages over consoles. The 32-bit era changed all that. Arcades held a graphical lead for another 10 years, but they no longer offered a difference in game play. More often than not arcade games would get ported to home consoles featuring cut down graphics, but no changes in game play. Manufacturer's started using versions of consumer consoles to power their machines which reduced the incentive for gamers to leave home. http://www.system16.com/base.php

    Those giant cabinets are manufacturer's attempts to offer something different. Also, while ops call out for smaller cabinets, they did the same with pins. This is why Safecracker and mini viper were made. They were not well received.

    #26 10 months ago

    for arcade games it seems obvious that the multiplayer cooperative/competitive games are the ONLY way to go. That is the unique experience that people like. I can say that everytime I have been to Logans in Chicago, the Killer Queen game is packed the entire night!

    The graphics suck, but the team game play is genious and people actually get in fights to play it.

    #27 10 months ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    for arcade games it seems obvious that the multiplayer cooperative/competitive games are the ONLY way to go. That is the unique experience that people like. I can say that everytime I have been to Logans in Chicago, the Killer Queen game is packed the entire night!
    The graphics suck, but the team game play is genious and people actually get in fights to play it.

    I had to check out Killer Queen, I never heard of it. It looks awesome!

    » YouTube video

    #28 10 months ago
    Quoted from pinmister:

    I also have noticed the size of the new arcade games. They are huge, and often are now in big enclosures or "Pods". Most of the newer arcades are either shooter games or car and motorcycle racing games that take up a large space. It would be great if they would start making average size cabinets again.

    That's one tactic to make a location unique now--placing over-sized games that most people can't have at home.

    http://www.gameroomguys.com/Games/New-Arcade-Video-Games/Namco-Worlds-Largest-Pac-Man-Arcade-Game.html

    #29 10 months ago
    Quoted from BlackKnight3000:

    I've been going to arcades since the early 70's when I was a kid and have seen the ups and downs of the industry. But what sucks now is that the new arcades I go to are nothing more than kid casinos. Some of them even have faux slot machines that payout in tickets!
    What I'm curious about is how do operators that run actual pinball and video game arcades sans redemption games, make money anymore? With pins costing upwards $10 grand, and some of the cockpit-style games costing much more, how in the hell do arcade operators make any profit?
    Yeah, I know the real money is made selling food/drink, but looking at some of these machines and I scratch my head how they're supposed to ever make back their original cost, let alone make a profit. Sure, with pins, operators can (I assume) run a machine for years, and then sell it on the collectors market and make some money, but that's not enough to pay rent and the light bill.
    I help run small local movie theater and our brand new projector and sound system cost us only $30k. That Star Wars Pod game costs $30k. How in the heck can it ever make it's money back one person at a time, even charging five bucks a person?
    Lastly, I think arcade games can indeed make a comeback. But in order to do that they will have to start making games that exceed what people can generally get at home with their X-boxes and PS4s. I sit down in some of these brand new racing games and I have to ask myself "did I just time travel to 1998?" Graphics for most arcade games today are just "Meh," IMHO.
    But, in the end, I'm still amazed, and happy that pinball has persisted. Mainly because it is one of the few real things left in this virtual world of ours. Plus, the ball is wild.

    Crazy to think about it but from some operators that I have talked to, the Star Wars Pod and Jurassic Park machines earn them the most and pay themselves off quickly.

    #30 10 months ago
    Quoted from MoonwalkerArcade:

    I've been an operator for almost 13 years.

    Not to be too nosey, but can you give us some figures on the amount of games played on some of your pins, and the price it costs to play them? That may give us some insight as to how long it takes to recoup the initial cost of the game.

    #31 10 months ago
    Quoted from Homepin:

    Jonathan - you should have a look at a very unique place in Newcastle Australia - "Pizza & Pinball".
    I don't need to explain the place further - I truly and firmly believe it is a business that could easily be franchised and have said this to the owners many times over many years.
    Dad walks in with son (or not) - orders a pizza and has NOTHING to do for 15 minutes. Hey look at all these pinball machines......

    I think you are right. People waiting around want something to do. What also works well is pubs that get families. The parents want to sit around and have a drink or two, kids start getting bored, shiny flashing pinball machines in the corner, kids ask for coins and you are sorted.

    #32 10 months ago

    Pinball is today a tiny niche, and nowadays pinball players play at home. If you like pinball, you find all sort of information online. We are the pinball players. We have machines at home. Some people cannot afford it or do not have the space, but I do not think anyway people will start dropping lots of quarters again in pinball machines. There are so many other games available for free. People after the digital revolution want things for free, or anyway cheap. Yes the real thing is so much better than the virtual one. But still people do not want to spend decent amount of money in pinball. People with deep pockets interested in pinball, buy one. People with little money potentially interested, do not even consider spending tens of dollars in pinball machines. Or they get organized, and realize that its better buying a machine, play it to death, and sell it for about the same price. People obsessed by pinball spent a lot in the past, now they buy machines. So operating Machines you can break even at best, so its not worthed, unless you do it for pure passion. Its similar to certain music niche markets: producers, musicians just survive becuase of passion, but there is no real business there.
    The only business left in pinball is building new machines and sell them to rich people to play at home. Or sell replacements, mods and tools online. Those are sound businesses.

    #33 10 months ago
    Quoted from frolic:

    2017 version: Then they both sit down and stare at their phones for 15 minutes and don't talk to each other.

    Alternate: Why would they even walk into pizza place to order? They order over phone app; app notifies them when pizza is ready.

    #34 10 months ago

    Thanks for the responses, everyone! Some great responses too!

    There's no reason why arcade games can't have graphics equal to a top of the line PC these days. My middle of the road PC can play a graphically amazing game, like Epic Games' "Paragon," that's a hair away from looking like a movie.

    But I think games that think outside the box, like "Killer Queen," are what should we be seeing more of than ride simulators. Another way to drum up business and get people to go to the arcades is to have special versions of a home game that give you rewards that you can only get in the arcade; and that you can transfer/use for your home game.

    A good example of this is the game "Destiny," which is arguably the most expensive game of all time, and one of the most popular on all of the consoles. Destiny is a FPS. FPS games really don't work well in the arcades because of the control setup favors mouse/keyboard and gamepads, vs. joysticks.

    In Destiny you get glowing engrams for completing a mission, or killing a boss, or participating in special events, or even just killing random "adds." (low level enemies.) You take these engrams to the cryptarch who decodes them, and give you powerups to your weapons, armor and other abilities. People sometimes play for MONTHS and YEARS trying to find a certain gun, or armor that they want because the engrams are randomized.

    BUT, if you made a "Destiny" pinball that was connected to the internet, players could come to the arcade, play the Destiny pinball, and achieve special engrams that they can ONLY get by playing the pin. Those engrams could then be transferred to their characters to play at home with. That same idea could be used with most games today, and would be a great way to get people to come into the arcades again.

    #35 10 months ago

    Online enabled pinball machines. Now that's some new thinking. Online scoreboards, multiplayer game modes on LCD screens, boss fights, and dare I say it? Downloadable content.

    #36 10 months ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    That's one tactic to make a location unique now--placing over-sized games that most people can't have at home.
    http://www.gameroomguys.com/Games/New-Arcade-Video-Games/Namco-Worlds-Largest-Pac-Man-Arcade-Game.html

    or this one:
    amazon.com link »

    #37 10 months ago

    We make money by not buying new junk that breaks the bank and keeping our existing Williams, Data East, and Sega games as clean and fully working as possible. Believe it or not it works, and our players love them. Addams Family, predictably, always makes the most. Always.

    #38 10 months ago
    Quoted from Crash:

    We make money by not buying new junk that breaks the bank and keeping our existing Williams, Data East, and Sega games as clean and fully working as possible.

    Or alternately, never putting any effort or parts into deteriorating trash piles that some fool will occasionally drop a quarter into.
    Thanks for being a good operator who keeps his games working and clean, but too many don't. That also turns people off to pinball in the long run.

    #39 10 months ago

    Easiest way for them to make money.

    pasted_image (resized).png

    #40 10 months ago

    coin drops from pinball machines is probably a decent way to launder money.

    #41 10 months ago
    Quoted from barakandl:

    coin drops from pinball machines is probably a decent way to launder money.

    That's funny because it's true. Lol

    #42 10 months ago
    Quoted from 0geist0:

    Easiest way for them to make money.

    I do not make money. I think that picture summarizes nicely what I'm doing wrong.

    #43 10 months ago
    Quoted from 0geist0:

    Easiest way for them to make money.

    D?

    #44 10 months ago
    Quoted from Luppin:

    There are so many other games available for free. People after the digital revolution want things for free, or anyway cheap.

    Anyone with kids or nephews has seen how today's children will watch ad after ad after ad while playing their free phone/tablet apps.

    Why not try this model with a pinball machine? Ad sponsored. Game is free to play. Have to watch a 5-15 second ad in between each ball, then a 30-60 second ad in-between games.

    Sounds crazy and I'm sure nobody in the business would be willing to give it a try. Would require a massive push on a massive title. Something like Star Wars. I'm sure operators wouldn't mind getting direct deposit from the ad agency instead of dealing with all the quarters each week.

    #45 10 months ago
    Quoted from FlippyD:

    Why not try this model with a pinball machine? Ad sponsored.

    It is certainly outside the box thinking. With LCD screens, I think displaying an ad would actually work ok.

    Do I like the idea personally? Not at all. But I can appreciate some outside the box thinking.

    #46 10 months ago
    Quoted from Bugsy:

    It is certainly outside the box thinking. With LCD screens, I think displaying an ad would actually work ok.
    Do I like the idea personally? Not at all. But I can appreciate some outside the box thinking.

    Oh it's an awful idea! But how many awful ideas already exist in the world of capitalism? If it allows operators to make more money and manufacturers to grow then it would be worth it. Don't think I would complain getting a bunch of free games on a fun machine!

    #47 10 months ago
    Quoted from FlippyD:

    Anyone with kids or nephews has seen how today's children will watch ad after ad after ad while playing their free phone/tablet apps.
    Why not try this model with a pinball machine? Ad sponsored. Game is free to play. Have to watch a 5-15 second ad in between each ball, then a 30-60 second ad in-between games.
    Sounds crazy and I'm sure nobody in the business would be willing to give it a try. Would require a massive push on a massive title. Something like Star Wars. I'm sure operators wouldn't mind getting direct deposit from the ad agency instead of dealing with all the quarters each week.

    Sounds like a good idea really! Well, in order to bring back pinball I mean of course. All lights should be off in attract mode: a non-attractive attract mode, only showing ads.. The ads stops when you begin playing. And as you said ads between balls and a minimum amount of time between games. Or even after 3 lock, before multiball starts. Ads coulb be custom made and somehow slightly linked to what's going on during the action! So you could make ads "interesting". It could be also done as in JM, where you are told some code or numbers (during the ad), that need to be remembered to achieve certain things during gameplay. And probably still the dear old coin slot for ad-free play..

    Wow.. Great idea!

    #48 10 months ago

    You'd think you could make money with pinball due to the high resale value of the machines even in routed condition. Also if you invest in a set of cliffys and just keep them clean they don't seem to get that much wear.

    #49 10 months ago

    Beer.

    #50 10 months ago
    Quoted from fattdirk:

    You'd think you could make money with pinball due to the high resale value of the machines even in routed condition.

    If that were true, there'd be millions of operators. Not all games appreciate, new or used.

    LTG : )

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    $ 10.00
    Playfield - Decals
    Metal-Mods
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 45.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Great American Pinball
    $ 44.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 25.00
    Apparel - Unisex
    Project Pinball Charity
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 8.00
    Cabinet Parts
    RPGCor
    $ 49.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 24.00
    Apparel - Unisex
    Double Danger Pinball
    $ 7,199.00
    Pinball Machine
    Operation Pinball
    $ 24.99
    Lighting - Led
    Lee's Parts
    $ 38.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    € 3.95
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 29.99
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 10.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 194.99
    Lighting - Led
    PinballBulbs
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