(Topic ID: 232111)

How are you handling the stock market


By GPS

1 year ago



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  • 63 posts
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  • Latest reply 1 year ago by SirScott
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    There are 63 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 1 year ago

    Hello All,

    Was just curious how others out there may be navigating the recent swings in the market. About two months ago i made some dramatic changes that I felt were needed and I am glad that I did. What do you see coming and are you still vested and will ride out the storm or have you gone to the sidelines and are awaiting the opportunity to get back in when pricing is right?

    #2 1 year ago

    SP500 was 700pts a decade ago.

    Hard to see it at 2900pts like we did recently & not think shit is bogus.

    With highs & lows like that how does the regular investor determine value?

    No idea

    #3 1 year ago

    We have taken the opportunity to take some capital losses at years' end. We'll be leaving a larger-than-usual amount in cash-equivs for a while until the bottom looks closer.

    _All_ of our investments pay dividends, so while our "paper" net worth has taken a hit recently, our income has not changed.

    11
    #4 1 year ago

    As warren buffet says, if you think stocks are expensive now try buying them in ten years, also like we hold long term as in forever.

    If a companies fundamentals are sound I really don’t pay attention to market swings, gotta look at stock market returns in terms of decades not short term

    Only retail investors really try to time the market and buy low sell high. Just buy a low fee mutual fund and sit tight.

    #5 1 year ago

    I’m a long term investor so of course will stay invested. In fact I bought more yesterday. I always like to buy my favorite products at a bargain.

    #6 1 year ago

    I am only buying high dividend stocks and not reinvesting so I can increase my cash. Storing a decent amount of cash........Winter is coming. We are way over inflated and will need to give back the entire gain since Trump was elected. High Debt and Fed unwinding.........Seems like a crash is always destined to happen. This country is full of a bunch of morons and it’s run by even bigger ones. That applies to the Democrats and republicans. Wake up America, like your mommy always told you, cannot spend what you don’t have!

    #7 1 year ago

    I'm investing in peach futures. That's how I'm dealing with it.

    #8 1 year ago

    ....I’ll let you know when I have enough money to invest.

    Just tryin to get by here.

    #9 1 year ago

    My 401k is just taking a beating right now.

    #10 1 year ago
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    #11 1 year ago

    I am 50% bonds and 50% stocks in my retirement funds. I’m 38. This is probably considered way too conservative but it’s helped during years like this.

    I sold most of minimal retirement assets 10 years ago and didn’t buy back in; and also bought a condo in 2006 at the worst time. So I’ve spent a lot of the last recovery just replenishing my savings.

    The mistake I made earlier was assuming that the government / fed would do the “right thing” and let the economy heal. But in reality this is the first generation of people to retire with stock market wealth as their retirement vehicle. (Think the Ira was created in 1982?) the government can’t afford to have a generation of people lose 50% of their wealth right before retirement hence why they blew an even bigger bubble. So while my gut says sell everything since it’s a wildly fake economy, my head says the rich assholes who run the country know their heads would be on pitchforks if they don’t reinflate.

    So I guess I’ll stay put at 50/50. Historically a 10% market decline after almost 10 years of big returns is a small price? Sure it could dive another 20% more. But at least I’m slightly hedged with bonds.

    #12 1 year ago
    Quoted from jackd104:

    I’m a long term investor so of course will stay invested. In fact I bought more yesterday. I always like to buy my favorite products at a bargain.

    Yep, unfortunately, most people buy when there is "irrational exuberance" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irrational_exuberance) and sell when people are panicking. This is why it's key to have some money on the sidelines (to buy when folks are freaking out). Impossible to call a bottom, so you nibble on bargains as things are falling. Just like with pins, if you don't plan on selling, price fluctuations don't matter. The worst thing folks can do is watch CNBC...it will drive you to sell everything given all the negativism.

    snaroff

    #13 1 year ago

    I’m buy and hold. There is a valuable technique called tax loss harvesting which you can do to capture the loss while keeping invested. Suppose you had S&P500 with a sizable loss you could sell and immediately buy a similar but not identical fund and use the loss to offset other gains or even income tax.

    Important to remember even if you are near retirement that doesn’t mean the end of investing, if you retire at 62 for example it’s possible for you to be retired for another 30 years.

    I like to point out that when looked at closely the market is up and down may seem big swings but step back and look over decades it’s a line going UP another down. Average stock gains with dividends is like 10% overall.

    #14 1 year ago

    I just ignore it,and it usually bounces back all by itself.This also works when stocks are going through the roof.

    #15 1 year ago

    In terms of the stock market I feel like I just have to hang on for the ride.

    The little guy cannot hope to know what to expect or have any effect on it -- I feel like there are people in the world today that have so much money or influence that they can create unwarranted panic or market swings just because they want to or because they want to hurt someone on the other side of the isle.

    #16 1 year ago
    Quoted from Richthofen:

    I am 50% bonds and 50% stocks in my retirement funds. I’m 38. This is probably considered way too conservative but it’s helped during years like this.
    I sold most of minimal retirement assets 10 years ago and didn’t buy back in; and also bought a condo in 2006 at the worst time. So I’ve spent a lot of the last recovery just replenishing my savings.
    The mistake I made earlier was assuming that the government / fed would do the “right thing” and let the economy heal. But in reality this is the first generation of people to retire with stock market wealth as their retirement vehicle. (Think the Ira was created in 1982?) the government can’t afford to have a generation of people lose 50% of their wealth right before retirement hence why they blew an even bigger bubble. So while my gut says sell everything since it’s a wildly fake economy, my head says the rich assholes who run the country know their heads would be on pitchforks if they don’t reinflate.
    So I guess I’ll stay put at 50/50. Historically a 10% market decline after almost 10 years of big returns is a small price? Sure it could dive another 20% more. But at least I’m slightly hedged with bonds.

    The government doesn’t control the stock market. They can intervene like during the Great Recession where they bailed out or forced other companies to take control of a failing company. They can lower interest rates and buy bonds to put money into the system. But this is not what the government is supposed to do on a long term basis and they need to let the market forces work it out. Otherwise there will be what high stock prices with nothing behind it.

    People should not be 100% in stocks so it’s on themselves to be balanced in stocks and bonds, the government can’t help people except by tax breaks for retirement plans that encourage to save and social security.

    It’s important for interest rates to be more than zero. It helps people who are older and depend on bond income to survive, it’s not healthy to keep rates super low forever.

    #17 1 year ago

    Definitely been a tough few months watching 80K disappear. If I was closer to retirement I would be worried or would have already moved to a more conservative investment. I'm still under 40 though and I look at these times as a chance to get more aggressive. Starting 3 months ago I increased all of my money market investments per month. I'm getting more stock for my money right now and if things turn around I will sling shot way in front of anyone that moved to conservative investments before or after the fall. Since I have 20 years to rebound I look at these things as an opportunity to get more for my money.

    So if you are about to retire I hope you already moved your money to safety, if not you should be worried. If you have 10+ years to rebound it's a great time to invest heavier. Yes there is more risk, but with increased healthcare and cost of living I feel I've got to be risky to get were I need to be.

    #18 1 year ago

    with exception of 2017, in the last five years the market has always made a December and or January adjustment. I have just been buying at those times and forgetting about it. i have already begun to do the same this year. buying low. this shit is all a scam controlled by billionaires. they control these adjustments so they can buy low and then sell off in late summer/early fall. its a game that is played and the little guys that time everything wrong get destroyed.

    #19 1 year ago

    Pork bellies is where it's at.

    #20 1 year ago

    Some years are better than others. I can not predict the future but realize over time stocks go up (including dividends).

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    #21 1 year ago

    As others say, using this opportunity to upgrade my portfolio and harvest losses. These are the situations that allow you o springboard.

    #22 1 year ago

    Interesting, first I'm retirement age and could collect social security but haven't. So I have balanced mix as it is including at least 10% in cash.
    I plan to keep working until I can't. So here's what I did last two months, I bought a DI.
    I took some of the cash and bought laddered CD's and bought another CD for a larger amount. I have trimmed small positions mostly in energy/oil.
    I reallocated about 4% of International into either Fidelity Puritan fund and higher rated domestic stock funds. i.e Blue Chip Growth.

    All in all I don't own any individual stocks, only no load funds and indexed funds. Yes this is painful but I guess you take the good with the bad.

    #23 1 year ago

    buy regularly and hold forever is my strategy.

    i let robots pick investments for simplicity and takes my emotion out of it. no touch

    #24 1 year ago
    Quoted from rai:

    The government doesn’t control the stock market

    But the federal reserve controls interest rates. Which correlate heavily with asset prices like stocks and housing.

    #25 1 year ago

    Roth IRA = S&P 500 Index funds 100%
    401k = S&P 500 Index funds 50%, 10% Small Cap, 10% international, 30% cash(for now)
    IRA = Individual Stocks based on research & cash - companies with low debt levels, great assets etc, reinvest dividends. Goal being to have a certain number of stocks in each company, ie 15 stocks in VZ, T, BP, XOM, WMT, GE, F, GM, LOWES, HD, etc etc.

    I have 35 years plus before retirement. Buy MORE when the market lowers, never sell, know your investments.

    #26 1 year ago

    Anyone have any stock market books they recommend reading?

    #27 1 year ago

    Nothing like watching my tech heavy portfolio drop 23%.

    Thankfully Weed stocks are still strong!

    #28 1 year ago

    i moved my 401K into an interest-bearing only account a little while ago. No losses this month.

    Time to buy. Thumbs up to the weed stocks. Wish I'd gotten in a couple years ago in Canada, some of the bigger ones have gained over 3000% since 2015. 42% from last year is still something to smile about though.

    #29 1 year ago

    Never try to time the market. Leave what you have there and buy more while you can at these prices. If it goes down buy more. Never sell when it’s low

    #30 1 year ago

    i get in and out like crazy - at first looked like a genius as i only buy fidility groth mutual fund - for 4 or 5 straight years i got 40% or more in return - way above market - but a few years ago when nasdaq hit 5000 i got out and for the last 2 - 3 years look like a moron with 4% return when the market is going up like crazy - so if you are trying to time the market - expect to look like a genious and an idiot.

    yesterday i actually put 125k in the growth company mutual fund hoping that there will be a 6-8% increase in jan - i set goals - nasdaq 6500 i would go 25% in - when and if it hits 7000 i will get that 25% for now as i still think long run we are looking at a recession coming.

    remember it's all a higher form of gambling - i don't do individual stocks anymore - just the fidelity growth as that is big in tech - so when market is going up it flys up - but when it's going down - it flys down also

    thanks ed

    #31 1 year ago

    Fully hedged and killing it!

    Love these crazy swings.

    -1
    #32 1 year ago

    I'm buying and buying and buying some more.l

    Here's a gimme, buy CBS today and hold for 12-18 months.

    #33 1 year ago

    I'm investing in pumpkins. They've been going up the whole month of October and I think they will peak right around January. Bam, that's when I'll cash in.

    #34 1 year ago
    Quoted from Eric_S:

    I'm investing in pumpkins. They've been going up the whole month of October and I think they will peak right around January. Bam, that's when I'll cash in.

    I sold Compu-Global-Hyper-Mega-Net to Bill Gates. Not the buy out I was expecting.

    #35 1 year ago

    I have friends that build systems for companies that sit in Manhattan due to proximity so their programs can complete high frequency transactions a millisecond faster and suck all of the value out of market volatility.
    Humans timing the market is so 20th century, you're better off taking the money to race track. If you got cash for stocks, best be in it for the long haul. Better yet, buy used pinball machines.

    #36 1 year ago

    Cashed out a bit 2 months ago, but still got plenty to just sit there and simmer for another decade or so.

    #37 1 year ago
    Quoted from tacshose:

    As warren buffet says, if you think stocks are expensive now try buying them in ten years, also like we hold long term as in forever.
    If a companies fundamentals are sound I really don’t pay attention to market swings, gotta look at stock market returns in terms of decades not short term
    Only retail investors really try to time the market and buy low sell high. Just buy a low fee mutual fund and sit tight.

    This is exactly right. I know it's not a popular idea but man buy and hold still works. Keep and eye on it but for the most part just leave it alone. I personally just buy a leveraged S & P 500 Fund like SSO or SPY, I personally feel safe as I feel like I'm investing in the biggest companies as a whole across several sectors so unless the entire economy decides to tank and stay tanked forever or if the fund managers lose their minds it won't be an issue. So far its worked out pretty well but again the key is for the most part is to just not look? Like when I bought shares of SSO in 2012 around $25 a share I figured man it would be cool if it got up to $35, it is currently at 103 just 5 years later. Meh thats cool hopefully it will keep up in the mean time I will leave it alone (Well for many many years actually hahaha).

    #38 1 year ago

    One thing I might suggest people consider...Options. Now I'm not talking high risk, like naked calls, or esoteric plays like condors and butterflys, but basic strategies; specifically, covered calls and buying and selling puts. People hear options and think that they are very risky or complicated. They read articles about the greeks and assume it is out of their league. With the market in a correction mode, options allow you to easily hedge risk, make some $ and/or purchase at below market prices.

    To repeat, it's not at all complicated, unless you want it to be and worth a bit of investigation in a volatile market.

    #39 1 year ago
    Quoted from Richthofen:

    But the federal reserve controls interest rates. Which correlate heavily with asset prices like stocks and housing.

    The Federal Reserve is not Federal nor a Reserve. It is an independent central bank that prints fiat currency using our good name/faith as collateral. This independent body has never had the best interests of Americans or the United States in mind since its illegal creation in 1913.

    #40 1 year ago
    Quoted from darcangeloel:

    This is exactly right. I know it's not a popular idea but man buy and hold still works. Keep and eye on it but for the most part just leave it alone. I personally just buy a leveraged S & P 500 Fund like SSO or SPY, I personally feel safe as I feel like I'm investing in the biggest companies as a whole across several sectors so unless the entire economy decides to tank and stay tanked forever or if the fund managers lose their minds it won't be an issue. So far its worked out pretty well but again the key is for the most part is to just not look? Like when I bought shares of SSO in 2012 around $25 a share I figured man it would be cool if it got up to $35, it is currently at 103 just 5 years later. Meh thats cool hopefully it will keep up in the mean time I will leave it alone (Well for many many years actually hahaha).

    Consider taking out what you invested in it (to get your money back), that way the rest still invested is actual free money to you. Then you can use those proceedings from getting your money back to choose your next stock purchase.

    #41 1 year ago

    I've thought about it. Playing with house money so to speak but doing so would make me not follow my own advice hahaha. No rather than take that initial investment out and have to pay capital gains tax I'll leave it in for another 20 to 30 years and watch it grow another 4 times over . If I die before then, my family gets it and they can do what they want with it and I won't care anyway hahaha. The key is the funds I've invested aren't what I use day to day things like side work, bonuses and extra funds go into that for the future so to speak. So even if the stock market implodes nothing is really lost so to speak, we would have much larger problems if every major company in the index started sucking over the course of 30 to 40 year. I'd still have my 401k and cash and such. I think that is the bigger point here. My a solid investment such as buying the top 500 companies and a single fund and then watch it but leave it alone as your risk is fairly low right for the most part I ignore the daily prices its the yearly and 10 year marks I'm looking for. The whole day trading / speculation on securities isn't for me. Just buy it, watch it and leave it the hell alone unless of some emergency.

    Quoted from lancestorm:

    Consider taking out what you invested in it (to get your money back), that way the rest still invested is actual free money to you. Then you can use those proceedings from getting your money back to choose your next stock purchase.

    #42 1 year ago

    For people some years from retirement. You will not have enough money in your 401k unless you are invested for long periods of time. That fact alone says that the stock market values will be fine, as there is always a lot of money waiting to be invested for the same reason. Having a time frame definitely changes the outlook though. Most brokerages have funds based on how far from retirement you are.

    #43 1 year ago

    Beep beep, just backed up the truck on Apple and Jan 21 LEAP option contracts with a strike price of 155 @ $27

    Don't buy bonds down here! The 10yr dipped under 2.8%. When it rises again, and it will, bonds will get hammered again. All of them. High Yields and preferred's as well. Floating rate? Nope.

    Use the SHY etf, 1-3 yr treasury for your cash/bond portfolio allocation, carries well and averages about 2.7 right now.

    Don't buy mutual funds, buy Etf's or individual stocks

    Don't buy "Target Retirement Funds" because of the bond component.

    Buy more of what you like, selling is WAY overdone. Fundamentals will be back in focus the first of January again with the start of earnings season.

    Buy Dividend payers. Things that will perform well in a recession. BLK, OAK, AAPL (at these prices), MKC, TJX, PSA, WM, CME, EPD (down here), T etc. Depending on age i'd mix in a small cap portion. MDB, my favorite, HUBS, TTD, EDIT, AYX, SHOP, ANET, ABMD to name a few.

    #44 1 year ago

    Don't EVER trade on emotion. Fear and Greed. You are like the firefighter going into the blaze and with a sense of calm. And then picking through the rubble for assets to rebuild on.

    #45 1 year ago

    The Rich have to show the working class who are in charge!

    #46 1 year ago

    I cashed in my 401K after the Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, etc bailout.

    #47 1 year ago

    Weed stocks are hit hard

    #49 1 year ago

    Smiling the whole time.

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