(Topic ID: 275182)

How and when would you fill these cracks? Wood Filler? Wood Glue?

By loomis

1 year ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 15 posts
  • 9 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Isochronic_Frost
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    View topic image gallery

    A71CEFC1-7E5C-488C-907C-77B59C27CCCF (resized).jpeg
    crack (resized).jpg

    #1 1 year ago

    Hello. Please see the photo.

    This old cabinet's showing her age. She's clamped down as much and she's going to be clamped down.

    These are old cracks that were there before I removed the front panel. You can see a little bit of the old water damage or beer that eventually ruined the front piece and probably caused these cracks.

    I just had a new front panel made, and I have to glue it in still.

    Normally, if I were repairing a piece of furniture, I'd glue the joints and rubber mallet tap the new piece in, then clamp everybody down to dry. But because these old cracks aren't going to close completely, I'm thinking I should fill them *before* sliding the new front panel in.

    So would you fill them with wood filler, or wood glue, or something else?

    And would you agree to deal with the cracks first, or get the front panel in and then deal with the cracks?

    Please let me know. Thanks.

    crack (resized).jpg

    #2 1 year ago

    Wood glue with a syringe on the back side and a clamp or two. Wipe away access bleed with a damp towel.

    #3 1 year ago

    Would you do that prior to wedging the new front panel in, and also before stripping the cabinet? Or in some other schedule? I'm leaning towards filling these cracks with glue before I do anything else, as mentioned above.

    #4 1 year ago

    Can you clamp that to where the cracks close? Maybe using some pipe clamps? If you can use some titebond that shit will never come apart.

    #5 1 year ago

    Yes, glue and clamp before you install the front panel.

    #6 1 year ago

    That should pull together pretty well using wood glue and a decent clamp appropriately tensioned. I would leave to set for 24 hours. You need to have the clamp tensioning right at the end of the piece to maximise its performance given the split is at the end.

    #7 1 year ago

    The more I think about this, I think this cabinet was stored in a barn or something face down, which destroyed the front and caused these cracks.

    Anyhow, clamping it down all the way, to where the cracks close completely, it ain't happening, not without the potential to crack it worse down the body line.

    So I'm ok with filling the remaining crack gaps and painting over them. What do you think?

    #8 1 year ago

    Sounds like a good plan.

    #9 1 year ago

    If you had a joint biscuit cutter, I would consider putting two of those in to lock the current position of the wood on both sides of the cracks. I would use a polyUrethra glue like gorilla, and then fill the gap that remains after the biscuit is in place, dried and then cleaned up.

    If you try to just fill and paint, the cabinet will reveal the cracks as the humidity changes. Not a big deal, but worth the use of biscuits if you really want to make it vanish....

    #10 1 year ago
    Quoted from Markharris2000:

    If you had a joint biscuit cutter, I would consider putting two of those in to lock the current position of the wood on both sides of the cracks. I would use a polyUrethra glue like gorilla, and then fill the gap that remains after the biscuit is in place, dried and then cleaned up.
    If you try to just fill and paint, the cabinet will reveal the cracks as the humidity changes. Not a big deal, but worth the use of biscuits if you really want to make it vanish....

    Hi, I Googled biscuit repairs a little, but I don't understand how they would be used to repair little cracks. Can you expand upon this? I'm not a woodworker. Thanks! PS - What about filling the cracks with epoxy?

    #11 1 year ago
    Quoted from loomis:

    Hi, I Googled biscuit repairs a little, but I don't understand how they would be used to repair little cracks. Can you expand upon this? I'm not a woodworker. Thanks! PS - What about filling the cracks with epoxy?

    First off, you would need a plate joiner to use the biscuits. But I believe he’s suggesting to put the biscuits on the edge, bridging the gap to help hold the wood from separating further. Then after all is set you trim the biscuit back flush with the edge. My crude drawing shows the biscuits in red

    A71CEFC1-7E5C-488C-907C-77B59C27CCCF (resized).jpeg
    #12 1 year ago

    Picture provided was Exactly what I was suggesting!!!

    #13 1 year ago

    Ok I understand now. And thank you. Within the crack itself, you would use Gorilla Glue, or Gorilla Epoxy, or Titebond Wood Glue, or something else?

    #14 1 year ago
    Quoted from loomis:

    Ok I understand now. And thank you. Within the crack itself, you would use Gorilla Glue, or Gorilla Epoxy, or Titebond Wood Glue, or something else?

    I like to use 2 part epoxy. some of these cracks you cant completely close and epoxy is better at filling voids. I usually put the crack flat and then use masking tape on the inside as a bottom to the void. fill void, sometimes using a disposable razor blade to work into crack and then clamp it together. Wood glue you get a little more working time... pluses and minuses

    #15 1 year ago
    Quoted from Markharris2000:

    If you had a joint biscuit cutter, I would consider putting two of those in to lock the current position of the wood on both sides of the cracks. I would use a polyUrethra glue like gorilla, and then fill the gap that remains after the biscuit is in place, dried and then cleaned up.
    If you try to just fill and paint, the cabinet will reveal the cracks as the humidity changes. Not a big deal, but worth the use of biscuits if you really want to make it vanish....

    PolyUrethra? I’d have a doctor check that out!

    Polyurethane is probably a better choice.

    Jokes aside, on my own cabinet I used wood glue and I just had the front panel break free after about 6 months so I’m going to use nails to finish it completely

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside