(Topic ID: 244808)

GTB 1965 Skyline-cab repaint notes


By wayner

11 days ago



Topic Stats

  • 8 posts
  • 4 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 days ago by goldenboy232
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

Topic Gallery

There have been 34 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

canon29072017 011 (resized).JPG
20190514_180557 (resized).jpg
20180722_140323_resized (resized).jpg
canon07062019 022 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 021 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 020 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 019 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 018 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 017 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 016 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 015 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 014 (resized).JPG
canon08062019 005 (resized).JPG
canon08062019 002 (resized).JPG
canon08062019 001 (resized).JPG
canon07062019 013 (resized).JPG

#1 11 days ago

In the past I have documented a number of restos which included cab repaints. While I certainly prefer the original patina at times it may be so dilapidated or emasculated by poor touch ups that a repaint is necessary. That was the case with this Skyline. The cab front was fairly typical of the cab condition.

canon29042019 007 (resized).JPG

My preferred stencil approach is to avoid adhesive stencils because generally they do not allow the spray bleed as per the original manufacturing process. Now that process used metal re-usable stencils but of course without the home equipment that for most of us is not available. I have therefore typically used mdf board for the stencils after first taking a graphics trace , transferring the trace to the mdf then cutting the stencil with a jigsaw-I use a fine tooth metal blade as it provides a nice fine cut and importantly does not rip the reverse side of the mdf. This is important as each re-usable stencil is used for both sides of the cab (except the fronts of course).

I wanted to specifically cover my approach to Skyline because the graphics include multiple continuous blue vertical and horizontal borders. For these borders my traditional mdf approach was not possible so I decided to fabricate blue border stencils using moulding from the local hardware store. All up the mdf for the red and non border blues and the moulding cost about $70. This compares to purchase of a retail stencil kit which with exchange rate and shipping would for me cost somewhere towards $A450.

These are pics covering some of the process:

-initial tsf of trace to mdf

canon05062019 021 (resized).JPG

-after jigsaw cutout and registration check with original graphics

canon05062019 023 (resized).JPG

-registration check for backbox blue horizontal borders

canon05062019 011 (resized).JPG

-cab primed

canon05062019 031 (resized).JPG

-cab base coat

canon05062019 032 (resized).JPG

Unfortunately I did not take a pic of the webbing application prior to graphics application but will appear in finished pics.

-spray process

canon05062019 014 (resized).JPG

canon05062019 015 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 003 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 001 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 002 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 005 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 007 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 008 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 009 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 010 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 011 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 012 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 013 (resized).JPG

Once the stencils have been fabricated and before removing cab paint I double check each stencil registration with the original cab graphics.Then cab paint is removed and structural/cosmetic cab issues addressed. The paint on this machine comprises white primer, base coat, webbing, red panels, blue border verticals and blue border horizontals. Examination of the original paint indicated the factory had sprayed the vertical and horizontal borders separately.

These are the spray guns I use:

-a high volume low pressure gravity feed gun (inexpensive) for the base coat

canon08062019 001 (resized).JPG

-a high pressure touch up gun (inexpensive) for the primer, webbing and general graphics

canon08062019 002 (resized).JPG

-a Badger Anmthem 155 airbrush (not an el-cheapo) for the fine work; in this case the blue borders

canon08062019 005 (resized).JPG

These are the stencils after use:

-backbox front and red squares

canon07062019 021 (resized).JPG

-backbox blue vertical and horizontal borders

canon07062019 022 (resized).JPG

-cab front and red squares

canon07062019 018 (resized).JPG

-cab front blue vertical and horizontal borders

canon07062019 019 (resized).JPG

-cab sides blue vertical and horizontal borders

canon07062019 020 (resized).JPG

These are the finished pics:

canon07062019 014 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 015 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 016 (resized).JPG

canon07062019 017 (resized).JPG

Overall I am happy with result and hope the process is of value to other pinsiders. I will post further pics when the complete resto is finished.

#2 11 days ago

Great job!!! I just finish a cabinet with poster board as the stencil. It worked but I’d much rather do what you did here.

#3 11 days ago
Quoted from mrm_4:

Great job!!! I just finish a cabinet with poster board as the stencil. It worked but I’d much rather do what you did here.

Thanks. You know its a funny thing I am not a tradesman but I prefer using a jigsaw to an exacto or retractable blade knife which is probably why I have used mdf.

#4 11 days ago

Impressive work as always, Wayne! Question: how do you transfer the trace onto the MDF board in the first place? I’ve never figured out that step. I’ve always only used the “Pinball Pimp” stencils, which turned out great, but may want to try this at some point.

#5 11 days ago
Quoted from goldenboy232:

Impressive work as always, Wayne! Question: how do you transfer the trace onto the MDF board in the first place? I’ve never figured out that step. I’ve always only used the “Pinball Pimp” stencils, which turned out great, but may want to try this at some point.

Use the trace as a cutting guide. When transferring to posterboard its straight forward cut thru with a sharp box cutter.

#6 11 days ago

Here's my stencil kit for Buckaroo, Kings & Queens, Cowpoke etc. I like the heavy oil board as my stencil, cuttable with a box cutter. I then weigh it down with MDF. Ive done a dozen checkerboard games with this kit.

It gives it a nice touch of factory fuzzy as shown with the KoD diamond I did with the oil board.

20180722_140323_resized (resized).jpg20190514_180557 (resized).jpg
#7 11 days ago
Quoted from goldenboy232:

Impressive work as always, Wayne! Question: how do you transfer the trace onto the MDF board in the first place? I’ve never figured out that step. I’ve always only used the “Pinball Pimp” stencils, which turned out great, but may want to try this at some point.

Thks Mark. I cut the tracing paper to create the outline for transfer to the mdf board. This is an example on the orange colour re my Double play. Best rgds Wayne

canon29072017 011 (resized).JPG

#8 4 days ago
Quoted from pinhead52:

Use the trace as a cutting guide. When transferring to posterboard its straight forward cut thru with a sharp box cutter.

Ken how do you keep the tracing paper from crumpling up as you cut through it, messing up the accuracy of the cut?

Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
$ 279.95
850
Machine - For Sale
Vacaville, CALIFORNIA
$ 279.95
$ 279.95
$ 279.95
$ 399.95
$ 48.00
Cabinet - Other
ModFather Pinball Mods
$ 159.99
Lighting - Other
Lighted Pinball Mods
From: $ 220.00
Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
CzTV Mods
$ 129.95
Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
Hookedonpinball.com

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside