(Topic ID: 198371)

Generators - It's time to upgrade


By mcluvin

1 year ago



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    There are 61 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 1 year ago

    So just went 8 days without power and realize it's time to upgrade my generator situation. I currently have a 5500 Watt Troybilt generator, a window AC ,and lots of extension cords. It actually runs a lot of my stuff, but I'd like to be able to run my 4 ton heat pump along with everything else (selectively). A neighbor has a 22K Watt Generac system and it eats propane like candy. I don't want that. I am strongly considering a Duromax 10/12K watt dual fuel generator. They are relatively cheap and can run on propane or gas. It should be able to run my heat pump. For those of you with generators, what is your setup?

    #2 1 year ago

    Do you have natural gas lines in your part of the neighborhood? You can always make a fitting to run the generator on the natural gas that runs from your house's line instead of propane. Infinite power, just as long as you have gas coming from the house.

    #3 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbaumle:

    Do you have natural gas lines in your part of the neighborhood? You can always make a fitting to run the generator on the natural gas that runs from your house's line instead of propane. Infinite power, just as long as you have gas coming from the house.

    We don't. I really don't want to rely on fuel delivery trucks either, so figuring on a setup where I can swap out propane tanks ideally, and gas if I must. Propane was never too hard to find this go around, but gas was dicey for a few days.

    #4 1 year ago

    I should've guessed when you mentioned you have a heat pump. You could always get a large 420 lb (holds 100 lbs of liquid propane) propane tank installed inline to the generator. Might be overkill, but we had that setup as a backup when I lived on the outskirts of York, Montana for a time. The tanks aren't terribly big. Maybe 4 feet tall and 3 or 4 feet in diameter? They hold enough where you can keep it filled for emergencies, and you won't have to worry about shipments or small tanks running out fast.

    #5 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbaumle:

    I should've guessed when you mentioned you have a heat pump. You could always get a large 420 lb (holds 100 lbs of liquid propane) propane tank installed inline to the generator. Might be overkill, but we had that setup as a backup when I lived on the outskirts of York, Montana for a time. The tanks aren't terribly big. Maybe 4 feet tall and 3 or 4 feet in diameter? They hold enough where you can keep it filled for emergencies, and you won't have to worry about shipments or small tanks running out fast.

    Fuel delivery gets expensive, at least around here. In the last ~13 years, I've had numerous multi-day outages in 2004, 1 in 2005, then this last one with Irma lasting ~8 days. I can go years without a power issue so don't want to invest a bunch in this, but this last outage highlights a need to try to improve the comfort level . At a minimum I'm going to add a power inlet box and interlock. I'll at least be able to run my hot water heater and dryer, and possibly my stove with my current generator. I know I'll need a generator upgrade to run the heat pump. It looks like if I add a soft start kit to my heat pump, I can definitely start and run it with a ~10K watt generator.

    5 months later
    #6 1 year ago

    Picked up an XP12000E as they just recently were very cheap on Ebay. It survived shipping undamaged. Thank you Fedex! Gonna crank it up tomorrow. Crossing my fingers for no issues. Still waiting on my interlock kit, power cable, and power inlet. This should be fun!

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    #7 1 year ago

    I picked up my dual fuel Champion at Costco, its been amazing for the money its not as powerful as the the XP12000E. I only run on propane. Gasoline fuel degrades and causes carb/needle issues when it sits too long even with stabilizer, I was tired of messing with it on my older gen.... since I don't have use it often enough. Propane, I only have to worry about the tank freezing. But if I need to run on Gasoline when propane runs out or freezes, or if more power is needed, its a win win. So many good options esp... electric start, but still has a pull cord just in case. Ran my break-in on the cheap oil that came with it and changed it ASAP with good oil, runs over 5 hours on a small 15-17lb propane bottle at lite to medium load.
    Costco had it on sale for like $599.99 I don't remember why, but I was like this too good to pass up. (love my membership any issues, I can return if I am not satisfied) I bought it in club, so no damage at all for shipping, so far its been great fires right up even comes with battery maintainer to keep the battery topped off. Oil change is super easy, has its own drain tube at the bottom. Had all the features I wanted for $600 plus tax. Some users run it on natural gas. If you need more power they make better models just not available at Costco.
    Only con I can think of is its yellow, however it looks good next to my Dewalt tools.
    https://www.costco.com/Champion-7000W-Running--9000W-Peak-DUAL-FUEL-Generator-wElectric-Start.product.100220385.html
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    Added 13 months ago: correction $549.99 it was on sale, they run this sale 1-2 times a year.

    #8 1 year ago

    Dual fuels are awesome. Only thing better than gas/lp are the diesel/kerosene/jet models. Depending on how you use it(or don’t).

    #9 1 year ago

    I bought a Honda generator, and had a connection to house installed so it powers the entire house if necessary via the main fuse box, including pins. Very quiet (for a generator) too, and auto-powers down when power not being drawn. I'd recommend it.

    7kW.

    http://www.honda.co.uk/industrial/products/generators/inverter/specifications.html#eu70is

    #10 1 year ago
    Quoted from camcamaro1991:

    I picked up my dual fuel Champion at Costco,

    That's a great price, especially considering the lifetime Costco warranty. Mine isn't dual fuel, but I'm probably gonna add an aftermarket kit. Honestly it looks like if you can rig a propane feed into the air intake, all you really need is an on demand regulator to safely convert to propane.

    Anybody using a soft start on their heat pump?

    http://hypereng.com/

    #11 1 year ago

    It's best to conserve energy in a power outage. Have two Champion 73536i 1700 watt inverters to run the basics. Quiet and more efficicient than standard generators. Also have a 15kw pto generator that we hook up to our Kubota tractor.
    Diesel is much easier to find than gasoline during storm preparedness. Propane is super expensive.

    #12 1 year ago

    Finally bit the bullet and purchased this in November of last year

    I got it at Harbor Freight for like seven hundred and fifty bucks and it's awesome. It's quiet and powerful enough to run quite a few of my electronics including the portable AC unit and a pinball machine.

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    #13 1 year ago
    Quoted from Toasterdog:

    Finally bit the bullet and purchased this in November of last year
    I got it at Harbor Freight for like seven hundred and fifty bucks and it's awesome. It's quiet and powerful enough to run quite a few of my electronics including the portable AC unit and a pinball machine.

    That should be able to run a dorm fridge, small room air conditioner, flat screen tv and lights. Oh yeah, and a few pinball machines.

    #14 1 year ago

    I finally got a Generac 16KW standby about 1.5 yrs. ago. It's been put thru its paces several times and has worked like a champ. 7 yr warranty finally closed the deal as I was also considering a Kohler. Had a nice 4KW (5KW starting) portable one that came in handy, but if I happen to be on travel, the better half likely could never figure out how to work it. With a finished basement, just didn't want to take a chance (Murphy's Law, you know). We live out in the boonies, so we are not the first in line for the repair work when needed...I'm guessing they hit the most populated areas first when restoring power.

    #15 1 year ago
    Quoted from camcamaro1991:

    I picked up my dual fuel Champion at Costco, its been amazing for the money its not as powerful as the the XP12000E.

    I bought one of these last year when it was on sale. I used my rebate on top of that and it ended up being around $400. I added a natural gas conversion so I now have tri fuel capability. I already had a natural gas line run outside but I had to upgrade it to 3/4" to be able to run the generator. So I'm now ready for an extended outage and don't have to worry about fuel unless it got really bad and NG couldn't be delivered to our home.

    The only bad thing about this generator is it is LOUD. Amazingly loud.

    I have the home set up so I can easily run the furnace and the fridge to keep from losing food. I can also run my mini split in the shop if the outage was during summer and we wanted to stay cool and sleep out there.

    The reality is I'll probably never need it. But for a short outage it would keep me from losing all the food in the fridge. We've lived in our home for almost 13 years and during that entire time we've only had a couple outages worth mentioning. The longest was a little over 8 hours. My subdivision is fed from some pretty major lines so if there was a bad storm our power would probably be restored fairly quickly. But having the backup capability is nice. It just takes one bad storm or ice storm to make it worth having.

    #16 1 year ago

    Power outages here are a couple of times a year. Trees fall down in storms, that happens living in the woods. We have a 9 kw gas burner. I feed back into the transfer switch with a 50 amp circuit. We are on a water well so the first outage made for a grouchy wife. I had he 1.5 kw unit in our camper . It would take care of the freezer working in shifts. 120 vac output no go on the well.
    The 9 kw will run the newer of the 3 ton heat pumps on the house. The newer unit starts the compressor , fan, and blower one at a time. The old unit has too much inrush. All motors start at once, the generator cannot enough reactive power for the start. More than enough to run it just can't start it.
    Long term plan a natural gas/gasoline automatic standby unit.

    #17 1 year ago

    LRA (locked rotor amps). Is a good way to size the generator you need to start yor air conditioner. My 2 ton package unit is 43 amps. 43x240 = 10320. Which means I'll need a 10kw generator to start it.

    #18 1 year ago

    I've read reviews where owners say they have been able to run a 4 ton heat pump with the XP12000. Maybe they are using a soft start kit and simply didn't clarify? Using the LRA x volts calculation, there should be no way it would work without one. I'd certainly prefer going with a 10 kw generator and a $250 soft start kit vs a costly 20 kw generator. Check the graph.

    surestart (resized).PNG

    1 week later
    #19 1 year ago

    Researching soft start devices, I found an HVAC thread where somebody actually popped one open to see what was inside. There was a nominal amount of electronics and a start capacitor. Between that and a couple videos showing most of the efficiencies gained were realized immediately, I suspect a $30 to $50 start capacitor kit would do nearly as well. I've got a USA made Amrad start capacitor on the way. I at least know Amrad makes solid products and it sure as hell didn't cost $250.

    #20 1 year ago

    Start kits work better with reciprocating compressors than scroll in lowering start up amps. I'd first go down to Grainger and buy a 3-5 ton hard start then spend $250. I think they're about $25. Needless, you need an amp probe to check what your start up amps are before you decide on a generator.
    I once installed delay on make relays on my condensor motor and blower motor to get the amps needed to start the compressor. That was after hurricane Jean.

    #21 1 year ago

    I got this from a semi-local place for $29. I've had good luck with Amrad capacitors in the past. We'll see. The heat pump is more a want than a need. I've still got a couple portable ACs for emergency use if necessary. After all said and done, I'll at least have double my current generator capacity and a 50 amp generator inlet. My wife will have hot water and I won't be running extension cords all over the place.

    amazon.com link »

    #22 1 year ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    I've read reviews where owners say they have been able to run a 4 ton heat pump with the XP12000. Maybe they are using a soft start kit and simply didn't clarify? Using the LRA x volts calculation, there should be no way it would work without one. I'd certainly prefer going with a 10 kw generator and a $250 soft start kit vs a costly 20 kw generator. Check the graph.

    This might not be relevant since I'm comparing it to my Generac, not your XP1200. But I will toss it out anyways as 'food for thought'. Our Generac has a smart switch wired into our hot tub. It simply monitors the frequency of the generator's output, not the voltage. If the 60 Hz deviates too low (i.e. the generator is being loaded too heavily), it will trip the smart box and disconnect the load. After awhile, it will reconnect and power the load, if the frequency is maintained within the proper range.

    Perhaps there's an aftermarket unit you can incorporate into your system.

    I'm not sure why an A/C manufacturer wouldn't incorporate the appropriate sized capacitor for a softer start, except for the minimal increase in cost (a few dollars, likely)...but I've have seen the mods advertised.

    #23 1 year ago

    Pass on the generator. Get yourself a nice power inverter setup instead

    www.invertersrus.com

    www.spartanpower.com

    #24 1 year ago
    Quoted from HoakyPoaky:

    Pass on the generator. Get yourself a nice power inverter setup instead
    http://www.invertersrus.com
    http://www.spartanpower.com

    And power the inverter with what?

    1 week later
    #25 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I'm not sure why an A/C manufacturer wouldn't incorporate the appropriate sized capacitor for a softer start, except for the minimal increase in cost (a few dollars, likely)...but I've have seen the mods advertised.

    Got the TES-4 installed and of course, it was defective. Ha! It would start the compressor, but apparently, the potential relay was stuck, and wouldn't remove the start capacitor from the circuit. This is not good. The compressor starts, runs for a bit, then stops (probably overheating).

    Anyway, quickly removed it from the circuit and e-mailed Amrad. They were very cool and offered a replacement with the newest model (TES-5). Their HQ is just up the road from me, so I drove up and they gave me a tour of the place. It was neat to see how the capacitors are made. I had no idea.

    So got the new part installed. You can definitely hear the relay click now and the compressor startup sounds so much better. I will probably leave the start capacitor out of circuit unless using the generator though. I imagine a start capacitor stuck on for any extended length of time would probably smoke that compressor. Why take the chance?

    #26 1 year ago

    Sorry to rain on everyone's parade but I am in the gas station/fuel delivery business. Gas stations and refineries do not have backup generators so when you run out of your initial supply, after that you are screwed. Better build a cabin in the woods with a pot-belly stove and shotgun. Just saying.....

    #27 1 year ago
    Quoted from smokey_789:

    Sorry to rain on everyone's parade but I am in the gas station/fuel delivery business. Gas stations and refineries do not have backup generators so when you run out of your initial supply, after that you are screwed. Better build a cabin in the woods with a pot-belly stove and shotgun. Just saying.....

    Not preparing for the end of the world, just my 8-10 day hurricane outage. This last time was a bit sketchy getting the gas for a few days, but I had stocked up in anticipation. Having the option to run propane or gas, I should be OK. Many of our gas stations in Florida do have backup generators for that matter. Propane refill stations don't require it.

    #28 1 year ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    Got the TES-4 installed and of course, it was defective. Ha! It would start the compressor, but apparently, the potential relay was stuck, and wouldn't remove the start capacitor from the circuit. This is not good. The compressor starts, runs for a bit, then stops (probably overheating).
    Anyway, quickly removed it from the circuit and e-mailed Amrad. They were very cool and offered a replacement with the newest model (TES-5). Their HQ is just up the road from me, so I drove up and they gave me a tour of the place. It was neat to see how the capacitors are made. I had no idea.
    So got the new part installed. You can definitely hear the relay click now and the compressor startup sounds so much better. I will probably leave the start capacitor out of circuit unless using the generator though. I imagine a start capacitor stuck on for any extended length of time would probably smoke that compressor. Why take the chance?

    I actually have a z-wave current monitor installed in my breaker box to monitor current when the sump pumps runs in the finished basement (yeah, I'm a geek, lol). And a couple for the whole house and one on the pins. Would be interesting to do the same on the heatpump and see if the inrush current actually is less with a different cap. Let me know if you want more details and I will post!

    #29 1 year ago

    I picked up one of these from Sams Club back when we lost power during an ice storm a few years ago.

    I was easily able to run my fuel oil furnace, refrigerator, several lights, TV/Satellite and it didn’t even break a sweat. Having 14 hours of run time on one tank is also a plus.

    I’m pretty sure if I wired my breaker box with a cutover, it would probably run everything in the house...maybe minus the electric stove.

    1D04ADA6-11BD-49E2-A182-13EB94571A80 (resized).jpeg

    #30 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I actually have a z-wave current monitor installed in my breaker box to monitor current when the sump pumps runs in the finished basement (yeah, I'm a geek, lol). And a couple for the whole house and one on the pins. Would be interesting to do the same on the heatpump and see if the inrush current actually is less with a different cap. Let me know if you want more details and I will post!

    Yeah sure. That would be cool. I thought about adding a meter box for the generator, but I've read they are next to useless. Some sort of z wave monitoring would be better, but this project is nickel and diming me to death. I do use a Smart Things controller, so the potential is there.

    Just to be clear, I'm using the same run cap. I just added an optional start cap. Just a night and day difference in startup sound from that compressor now though.

    #31 1 year ago
    Quoted from Niterider:

    I picked up one of these from Sams Club back when we lost power during an ice storm a few years ago.
    I was easily able to run my fuel oil furnace, refrigerator, several lights, TV/Satellite and it didn’t even break a sweat. Having 14 hours of run time on one tank is also a plus.
    I’m pretty sure if I wired my breaker box with a cutover, it would probably run everything in the house...maybe minus the electric stove.

    Be careful, too many watts lowers voltage which could lead to burnt wires. Might want to stick to extension cords.

    #32 1 year ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    Yeah sure. That would be cool. I thought about adding a meter box for the generator, but I've read they are next to useless.

    Hi MC,

    I tried to paste a SnipIt of one of the current probes just so you can see what it captures. More of a fyi than anything... I can see when the hot tub runs, when the heat pump runs, electric stove, fridge, etc. I too run Samsung SmartThings.

    Capture (resized).png

    #33 1 year ago

    Just picked up my first generator in our last 3 day outage.

    Bought a Generac GP5500 and it worked flawlessly. It is loud but I ran my oil burner , lights , microwave , and tv hooked up with a good surge protector

    Trying to find out what the THD is on the unit but they don’t say. I’m wondering if it’s safe to run electronics with it Also would the surge protector make it ok if the THD is greater than 5%.

    Also just finishing hooking up a transfer switch to make it easy next time.

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    #34 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    Hi MC,
    I tried to paste a SnipIt of one of the current probes just so you can see what it captures. More of a fyi than anything... I can see when the hot tub runs, when the heat pump runs, electric stove, fridge, etc. I too run Samsung SmartThings.

    When I had Progress Energy at my old house, they upgraded the meters and gave us this sort of monitoring for free. It was pretty cool.

    #35 1 year ago
    Quoted from hoby1:

    Just picked up my first generator in our last 3 day outage.
    Bought a Generac GP5500 and it worked flawlessly...
    Trying to find out what the THD is on the unit but they don’t say. I’m wondering if it’s safe to run electronics with it Also would the surge protector make it ok if the THD is greater than 5%.

    Hoby1,

    If you really want to know the distortion, the simplest (and cheapest) way to measure would be w/a modern scope that has that feature or a math feature which is called 'FFT' built it. I won't go into the details unless you want to know. You can just 'YouTube' it if you want to know. And it probably changes depending on the load. I did look at the 5500 spec sheet which mentions less than 5%, but of course, it didn't go into the test conditions. But the data sheet does mention it's safe for electronics. You can see it here: http://gens.generac.com/generaccorporate/media/library/content/all-products/portable-recreational-power/0180710sby-portable-full-line-catalog.pdf?ext=.pdf

    Regarding the surge protector - a surge protector usually clamps a high frequency spike in the nano second range, and the surge is a high voltage event (higher than the 120V). Distortion is a harmonic of the line voltage (i.e. 2nd harmonic is 120Hz, 3rd harmonic is 180Hz, etc., if line frequency is 60Hz), and the hamonic is much, much lower than the 120V line voltage. What might be the biggest concern would be if you load the generator too much by running to many appliances, the 60Hz could drop in frequency, causing some power supplies to be less than 'happy'.

    Just my 2 cents - hope this clarifies things a bit.

    Mark

    #36 1 year ago
    Quoted from hoby1:

    Trying to find out what the THD is on the unit but they don’t say. I’m wondering if it’s safe to run electronics with it Also would the surge protector make it ok if the THD is greater than 5%.

    The only electronics I've ever killed with a generator were a couple battery backups. I've had a large LCD TV not run well on a generator, so I just disconnected it. A smaller TV ran fine. I've used some pretty crappy generators over the years.

    Given everything else I'm upgrading, I am also installing a HEPD80 whole home surge protector in my main panel.

    #37 1 year ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    The only electronics I've ever killed with a generator were a couple battery backups. I've had a large LCD TV not run well on a generator, so I just disconnected it. A smaller TV ran fine. I've used some pretty crappy generators over the years.
    Given everything else I'm upgrading, I am also installing a HEPD80 whole home surge protector in my main panel.

    Square D makes some that simply snaps into an empty slot in a beaker box. You just need to connect the ground wire (keeping it short). Might save you some time installing.

    Here's mine:

    20180324_105902 (resized).jpg

    #38 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    Square D makes some that simply snaps into an empty slot in a beaker box. You just need to connect the ground wire (keeping it short). Might save you some time installing.
    Here's mine:

    I just finished installation believe it or not. The hardest part was knocking out the hole in the box. One wire to ground, one to neutral, 2 to a dedicated double pole 20 or 30 amp breaker. Easy peasy with a healthy dose of respect for that which can kill ya I looked at those like the one you have, but the HEPD80 seemed to be the most bang for the buck. It really wasn't difficult.

    Here's my crummy pic.

    hepd80 (resized).PNG

    #39 1 year ago

    I have the transfer switch for most of the home but no connection to the well pump breaker. Thinking of getting a small generator just to get the well 220 running for water. Anyone know of a switch to wire into a well direct to the pump?

    #40 1 year ago

    Good deal MC. I didn't have access to the sides since my garage has peg board installed. So going internally was my best bet. Try to keep the wires as short as possible since those will look inductive (meaning it will make the surge spike less prone to actually being clamped by the transient protector).

    I still use surge suppressors throughout the house as a second line of defense since you can never be sure where the spike sneaks in at. That could happen with a nearby lightning strike - could get picked up by the wires in the house, and not come in thru the mains at the fuse box.

    Playing around inside a live breaker box - fun, eh? LOL

    #41 1 year ago
    Quoted from JimB:

    I have the transfer switch for most of the home but no connection to the well pump breaker. Thinking of getting a small generator just to get the well 220 running for water. Anyone know of a switch to wire into a well direct to the pump?

    JB,

    Before I ended up finally going to a whole house generator, I had a 2nd, smaller, breaker box for the primary circuits I wanted to run. Sumps, well, fridge, some lights, etc. When the electrician installed, they used like a teeter-tot piece between the mains and the 120V from the roll-around generator. It's just a piece of metal that pivots to one breaker or the other, but not both. This prevents you from accidently back-feed the generator into the mains since only one breaker could be on at a time.

    Might not completely fit your needs, but something similar might be appropriate. Just get a small breaker box for the well pump that can switch between the breakers - one for the normal 220V, the other for the generator. And the metal piece prevents 'bad things' from accidently happening. You can see it in the pic below. Make sense?

    Good luck!

    20180324_124215 (resized).jpg

    #42 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    Good deal MC. I didn't have access to the sides since my garage has peg board installed. So going internally was my best bet. Try to keep the wires as short as possible since those will look inductive (meaning it will make the surge spike less prone to actually being clamped by the transient protector).
    I still use surge suppressors throughout the house as a second line of defense since you can never be sure where the spike sneaks in at. That could happen with a nearby lightning strike - could get picked up by the wires in the house, and not come in thru the mains at the fuse box.
    Playing around inside a live breaker box - fun, eh? LOL

    I'd have preferred mounting it on the side to keep the wires short as possible, but there were no knockouts. I'm not sure it would be kosher to make my own and suspect probably not. Plus I'm in Florida, so water intrusion is a concern. You've got me wondering if I should install another in my garage panel?

    I kill the breakers when I'm working on it, but I know the main feeds on the main panel are still hot. I give them plenty of space

    #43 1 year ago

    I actually have a 2nd breaker box in the basement, fed by the main box in the garage. That powers all the basement stuff - rather nice. So I also installed one down there too since it was easy. Sure is nice to have the 2nd box since I can add another breaker for more pins!

    Mains always hot - LOL. Same on my end. I took a piece of cardboard and covered the feed lines into the house for when I accidentally do something stupid.

    #44 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    Mains always hot - LOL. Same on my end. I took a piece of cardboard and covered the feed lines into the house for when I accidentally do something stupid.

    Fortunately, I rarely need to go into it. It only contains my main breaker and a couple irrigation breakers. Your lucky you have space to add more circuits in your basement panel. My garage panel was full.

    #45 1 year ago

    If your panel is full then look into quad breakers.

    #46 1 year ago
    Quoted from Electrocute:

    If your panel is full then look into quad breakers.

    Thanks. I didn't even know they made quads. Not sure those would have worked for me though as the panel didn't have the notch to take tandems. Though, I could have popped a couple of the older style (pricey) in to make it work. I needed another main breaker anyway, so I found a value pack load center that would take tandems and also used the same box. It fit perfectly and for just a little more money. Plus now I've got even more room to expand if I need it.

    #47 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    Hi MC,

    I tried to paste a SnipIt of one of the current probes just so you can see what it captures. More of a fyi than anything... I can see when the hot tub runs, when the heat pump runs, electric stove, fridge, etc. I too run Samsung SmartThings.

    Will this also measure amps?

    #48 1 year ago

    Interlock is installed and just gotta wire up the generator inlet. We are almost cooking with Crisco!

    interlock (resized).PNG

    #49 1 year ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    Will this also measure amps?

    I bought the discontinued Aeon current probe (maybe $20-$30). It ONLY measures current in amps. You can set the voltage for a default value (i.e. 120V) to estimate power (Power = voltage x current). The newer clamp also measures the voltage, which I believe allows you to directly measure watts and apparent power (without being too geeky, this is what happens when current and voltage is out of phase). I wasn't worried about that, so the cheapie version was fine by me.

    Hope that answers your question, I can go into more detail if needed. Just holler if needed.

    #50 1 year ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    Interlock is installed and just gotta wire up the generator inlet. We are almost cooking with Crisco!

    Looks like you are almost there!

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