(Topic ID: 153786)

Game Room Build Thread


By Spyderturbo007

4 years ago



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    There are 332 posts in this topic. You are on page 3 of 7.
    #101 3 years ago
    Quoted from amkoepfer:

    Looks great! How many gallons so far?

    10 so far. Their 350 - 400 sq ft / gallon is way off.

    Quoted from Jazman:

    The key to sanity on a project like this is definitely what's in the bottom middle of the 2nd picture. I know it helps while I've been working on the long boring tasks like drywall and paint!

    I have to confess....That was just some orange soda. But, when I was done, I sat down with some Grey Goose.

    Quoted from investingdad:

    Yeah, I felt the same after I got two primer coats on. It started looking like a real space. Exciting!

    Any reason you went with 2 coats? The single coat I put on appears to have covered the walls really well, except in the bathroom. I suspect it has something to do with the moisture resistant drywall they used in there though.

    #102 3 years ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    10 so far. Their 350 - 400 sq ft / gallon is way off.

    I have to confess....That was just some orange soda. But, when I was done, I sat down with some Grey Goose.

    Any reason you went with 2 coats? The single coat I put on appears to have covered the walls really well, except in the bathroom. I suspect it has something to do with the moisture resistant drywall they used in there though.

    My preference before top coating is to prime such that no roller marks are visible.

    #103 3 years ago
    Quoted from investingdad:

    My preference before top coating is to prime such that no roller marks are visible.

    I think it all depends on how you do the one coat. I know I've done a more sparing first coat where I stretched how far the paint load went (this was manual/tray based and not power fed like you did). When I did that, I had to do two coats. If I did it right and just did a good smooth "non-skimpy" first coat, one primer coat was enough.

    I really hate painting so doing it right the first time is very important to me!

    Jaz

    #104 3 years ago
    Quoted from Jazman:

    I think it all depends on how you do the one coat. I know I've done a more sparing first coat where I stretched how far the paint load went (this was manual/tray based and not power fed like you did). When I did that, I had to do two coats. If I did it right and just did a good smooth "non-skimpy" first coat, one primer coat was enough.
    I really hate painting so doing it right the first time is very important to me!
    Jaz

    Nope, no power rolling here...different poster. I rolled with manual roller, extending rod, and paint tray.

    #105 3 years ago

    I^^^^^^^^^ I hear ya, brother. I have approx. 1800 ft square basement. I have about 28 gallons of premium paint. One primer coat and two top coats. It's all being done by hand with your basic Purdy roller on the end of my push broom handle. With Porter Paints you don't have to worry about roller marks.

    2 weeks later
    #106 3 years ago

    Progress has been slow. The trim is almost finished in the game room and the door to the mechanical room is installed. I really need to get off my ass and pick some paint colors. I'm planning on doing the rest of the trim this weekend and getting some more doors installed.

    On a happy note, my bathroom vanity and the sconces for the bathroom and theater were delivered yesterday! It was a lot more than I wanted to spend, but I think it was worth it in the end.

    IMG_0786_(resized).JPG

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    Here is the reclaimed lumber I'm considering for the bar and possibly an accent wall.

    IMG_0792_(resized).JPG

    #107 3 years ago

    Looks awesome! Wish i would have done my trim prior to painting, but it made painting a lot easier not having to deal with avoiding the trim when i painted

    #108 3 years ago

    Thanks. It was my brother in laws suggestion to do the trim first. He said it makes it easier to paint the trim and I guess he just cuts in the walls by hand without having to tape. He said you also don't have to go back and touch up the trim after getting it installed.

    #109 3 years ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    Thanks. It was my brother in laws suggestion to do the trim first. He said it makes it easier to paint the trim and I guess he just cuts in the walls by hand without having to tape. He said you also don't have to go back and touch up the trim after getting it installed.

    Weird. For me, I would paint first and then do the trim. But, in almost every case I've used stained hardwoods for trim so the trim isn't painted.

    Painting is one of those things where I say whatever works for the person doing it is the right way to go... because I know I don't want to do it!

    Jaz

    #110 3 years ago

    I've hit a roadblock. I'm completely stuck on color choices. Everything revolves around reclaimed lumber. The problem is that I've gotten 3 samples of the same lumber and they aren't even close. I expect some differentiation between them, but I have one that's almost black, one that is gray and one that is brown.

    I emailed the company last week and haven't received a response.

    Without know which lumber sample I'm going to use means I can't pick the floor or wall colors.

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    #111 3 years ago

    Great to see the progress you are doing. Things are looking really good!
    I can't wait to see the wood treatment you have coming.

    #112 3 years ago

    Thanks FalconDriver. I can't wait to be finished.

    There aren't any plumbers around here is there? I'm trying to figure out the best way to handle the toilet in the bathroom. The plumbing goes through the slab so I have a standpipe for the toilet.

    The thing is that I don't know how to handle the standpipe. Do I install the floor, then cut the stand pipe flush with the floor, or does it get cut now, then I install the flange / toilet and then install the floor?

    #113 3 years ago

    Don't feel bad about the color variations on your wood products (other than being disappointed). I wanted to recreate an antique brick wall. I choose the model from the color swatches on Lowe's website. The bricks I received weren't even close. I wasn't going to return them; just had to do a different style of wall with different grout.

    PS - I would not cut the stand pipe until the floor is finished (painted, tiled or whatever).

    #114 3 years ago

    That's what I was thinking. Install the tile first, then cut the standpipe. It looks like this is the flange I need to glue inside the standpipe once it's cut flat with the top of the tile. Then a wax ring and I'm all set.

    http://www.oatey.com/products/drains-and-closet-flanges/closet-flanges/level-fit-closet-flange-with-metal-ring

    #115 3 years ago

    Just dove into this thread, incredible.

    #116 3 years ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    That's what I was thinking. Install the tile first, then cut the standpipe. It looks like this is the flange I need to glue inside the standpipe once it's cut flat with the top of the tile. Then a wax ring and I'm all set.
    http://www.oatey.com/products/drains-and-closet-flanges/closet-flanges/level-fit-closet-flange-with-metal-ring

    All of the home improvement stores will have the toilet flange and wax ring. Many different styles and materials to choose from.

    2 weeks later
    #117 3 years ago

    After two weeks of having other stuff to do, I finally got a little time on Sunday to do some work. I have the hardwood picked out for the floor in the bar and am ordering the reclaimed lumber today. Once I actually receive the reclaimed lumber, I can solidify my flooring choice. I just need to be sure that I get the correct shade of lumber.

    Once that's done, I can finally pick out some paint and maybe get moving on this project again. We were flying along and then life got in the way.

    The trim is done in the game room and we were able to get the theater subfloor laid on Sunday. Well, all but one piece. I was short on my count apparently. Once I get that piece, I can tapcon the subfloor to the slab and start on the riser.

    IMG_1043_(resized).JPG

    #118 3 years ago

    In my basement project so far I have been disappointed twice in color samples and actual material received. I wanted to do an antique looking brick wall and picked appropriate colors from the on-line samples. What I received (boxes marked correctly) didn't look anything like the sample swatch. Same thing for the stone wall. Point being that it doesn't matter what color - gray, brown, etc. - that you select, the reclaimed lumber you receive won't like anything like the samples. Pessimist or realist? That's why they have those little fine print disclaimers. Wait until you get the material then react to the next color selection for carpet, etc.

    I'm still trying to wrap my head around this sub-flooring. People kill to increase the height of the ceiling and you needlessly made it smaller. Especially when you turn around and put in a riser. You could have taken that money and bought some nice bass traps.

    #119 3 years ago
    Quoted from fordtudoor:

    I'm still trying to wrap my head around this sub-flooring. People kill to increase the height of the ceiling and you needlessly made it smaller. Especially when you turn around and put in a riser. You could have taken that money and bought some nice bass traps.

    I did it for the sound isolation aspect. Put your ear down to a concrete floor and have someone smack it with a hammer on the other side of the room. Then install a sub floor, do the same thing and tell me which one resonates more.

    Concrete is a very efficient conductor of low frequencies.

    #120 3 years ago

    But I would think that carpet plus foam padding would negate most of that. Your biggest problem with reflecting sound is going to be drywalled ceiling and walls. All the home theaters I have looked at have bass traps on the walls and ceiling with emphasis at internal corners. Never seen any treatment of floors other than spikes on the speakers.

    #121 3 years ago
    Quoted from fordtudoor:

    But I would think that carpet plus foam padding would negate most of that. Your biggest problem with reflecting sound is going to be drywalled ceiling and walls. All the home theaters I have looked at have bass traps on the walls and ceiling with emphasis at internal corners. Never seen any treatment of floors other than spikes on the speakers.

    Maybe you missed the fact that he also has done a ton with regard to isolating and sound insulating the walls and ceiling as well. Given all that, not doing the floor would have seemed like an oversight...

    I think most of his efforts have been toward keeping outside sounds out and inside sounds in. I don't think he's done much with regards to sound control inside the room...

    Jaz

    #122 3 years ago
    Quoted from fordtudoor:

    But I would think that carpet plus foam padding would negate most of that. Your biggest problem with reflecting sound is going to be drywalled ceiling and walls. All the home theaters I have looked at have bass traps on the walls and ceiling with emphasis at internal corners. Never seen any treatment of floors other than spikes on the speakers.

    It will definitely help, but with all the money I've put into soundproofing so far (~5,000), I'm not going to skimp on the $500 it cost to install the subfloor. It also adds isolated mass which will help with acoustics. I'm trying to follow what I've read Dennis Erskine (http://erskine-group.com/) recommends. He seems to be the foremost expert on acoustics and says you should have a subfloor. I've also been working with Ted White from The Soundproofing Company on designing the structure of the room.

    The front wall will be lined with Linacoustic and a riser for the speakers will be built and filled with sand. I can build a bass trap later if needed.

    Quoted from Jazman:

    I think most of his efforts have been toward keeping outside sounds out and inside sounds in. I don't think he's done much with regards to sound control inside the room...

    Absolutely correct. I'm not at the point yet to start dealing with reflection points and dampening. I'm leaning towards the bottom half of the walls being MDF and the top half being OC 703 inside of a frame wrapped in acoustically transparent GOF fabric. I found a place that will print movie posters on AT fabric, so I was going to add a few of them around the room.

    The biggest issue I'm facing now is handling the door and an 8" jam. I'm thinking of going with a solid core door and having a company build a custom jam. Then I can throw a few layers of MDF and Green Glue on the door to increase it's mass. I'd like to communicating doors, but the jam isn't deep enough and I can't have a door swing into the room because of the riser. The room just isn't wide enough to handle a door that swings in.

    1 week later
    #123 3 years ago

    I finally got some time this weekend to do a little work. We got almost all of the tile set in the bathroom. I just need to do the small sections on the right and left side, but wanted to wait until the rest of it dried before doing the edges. I want to be close enough to the drywall so that I don't need quarter round and there isn't a grout line at the edge.

    Here is a picture of when we just dry set it to get a feel for the layout. The tile is actually gray, not brown, but the iPhone doesn't do the greatest job of color reproduction. I decided that I'm going to use the same tile for behind the bar.

    image1_(resized).jpeg

    #124 3 years ago

    Turbo,

    Two observations on your tile job that you may want to consider: 1) Since your bathroom is considered a secondary room to your main room (where the concrete is) the tile should not "protrude" into the main room. Once you have the door installed and it is closed, the tile would be showing at the bottom when viewed from the main room. Not the norm. I would cut it back to just beyond the door stop trim. 2) I do not see the aluminum edge trim in the threshold to protect the edge of the tiles. It is recommended if you are going to put down carpet. Hardwood flooring or other tile you probably wouldn't have to do it. Just my thoughts.

    #125 3 years ago
    Quoted from fordtudoor:

    1) Since your bathroom is considered a secondary room to your main room (where the concrete is) the tile should not "protrude" into the main room. Once you have the door installed and it is closed, the tile would be showing at the bottom when viewed from the main room. Not the norm. I would cut it back to just beyond the door stop trim.

    Thanks fordtudoor, but I'm not sure how your figuring that the tile will protrude into the room? The door opens out into the main room, which means that the front of the door will be virtually flush with the face of the drywall. That means that the transition needs to be directly under the door, or slightly back from the face of the drywall.

    If you look at the picture, we are ~1" back from the face of the drywall.

    #126 3 years ago

    My bad. My eyesight is failing me in my old age. At first blush it looked like the tile was flush to the door jamb. "Upon further review" I can see a slight offset. Remember...if you do go with a tile edge trim that you will have the thickness of the extrusion plus a grout line that you would add to the leading edge of the tile run. Then you start getting closer to the edge of the door instead of a generous recess. Just a thought.

    #127 3 years ago

    Looking great. I have a low ceiling and still chose a subfloor. The added warmth and comfort is worth more than any bass traps. I hate fish anyway.

    #128 3 years ago

    ^^^^^Your body may but your ears won't.

    #129 3 years ago

    We finished up the bathroom on Sunday and laid the tile in the bar. I also ordered the reclaimed lumber for the bar which should be here in 2 - 4 weeks. I'm hoping to grout this week and then we can start on some more stuff in the theater.

    I can also finally go pick paint colors and start working on the painting. Yea!!!

    image1_(resized).jpeg

    3 weeks later
    #130 3 years ago

    We had some great progress over the weekend. I'm happy to say that I now have a fully functional bathroom in the basement. I still need to hang the towel holder, TP holder, and install the sconces, but other than that, it's completely finished. We put in about 12 hours on Saturday and another 10 or so on Sunday.

    The stand pipe wasn't as bad as I thought it would be to handle. We cut it off and found out the flange wasn't flush with the tile. A diamond Dremel bit and about 15 minutes later, we had cut out a little bit of the tile around the pipe and it sat perfectly flush. I picked up some diamond tipped core bits and was able to drill 3 holes in the tile for the closet flange before I smoked the bit. We stepped up to a slightly larger size and drilled the 4th. It didn't matter either way since the Tapcons were grabbing the concrete below and not the tile.

    IMG_1350 (resized).JPG

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    I spent Saturday night at the paint store and picked out colors for everything except the theater. I got the painting done late Saturday and early Sunday morning. Sunday afternoon / evening we sat the toilet, installed the vanity, sink, mirror, marble and took care of all the plumbing.

    It's now officially a usable bathroom.

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    #131 3 years ago

    Nice to see the vanity installed - looks great with that mirror

    #132 3 years ago

    Just read through the thread, , it gets me really excited for my own game room build.

    I have an unraid setup too!

    I undertasnd that you are planning to use kodi for your media. I used xbmc/kodi for years, but found plex through a friend about a year ago. It's scraping and ui has saved me so much time when adding or changing my library. My family has thanked me as well, it's much more user friendly for kids and wife that don't quite get a grip on the controls to manage kodi.

    Plex also allows access to all your media outside your network if you have a gold pass. Not a salesman here just found kodi consuming too much time with scrapers not functioning consistently, having aspect ratios go crazy when I changed anything in my media player, or having a power outage throw things off. Plex seems to be more polished since it is a commercial product.

    Let us know your setup as far as kodi and media serving goes, can't wait to see how your theater turns out!

    #133 3 years ago

    The bathroom is officially 100% done. TP holder, Towel Rack & Sconces were installed Sunday. It turned out better than I could have imagined. Unfortunately, the pictures done do it justice.

    image (resized).jpeg

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    #134 3 years ago

    Nice job! Love the detailed writeup as well as some of the ideas provided.

    #135 3 years ago

    This is a great thread. Moving into our new house in December up in Erie......although not as big as your basement, I love the layout you went with and hope to go with something similar. I want to get started right when we move in so I don't just fill the basement up with crap/storage I'll eventually have to move out later. Again very nice job.

    #136 3 years ago

    Looks awesome! Congrats!

    1 week later
    #137 3 years ago

    Thanks everyone. I'll keep the pictures coming as we get stuff done. It's been slowing down now, but I really need to get motivated to paint. That's the big hold up.

    But I hate painting. Well, that and my bank account is on strike.

    Anyway, we started on putting up the reclaimed lumber on the bar face. Only got to work on Sunday and it was taking longer than expected.

    All the boards are different lengths, thicknesses and color. Add that to the character of each board like saw marks, old nail holes, knots and trying to waste as little as possible because of the expense and it's a slow go.

    But, here is where we are so far.

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    #139 3 years ago

    Well done!

    #140 3 years ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    We had some great progress over the weekend. I'm happy to say that I now have a fully functional bathroom in the basement. I still need to hang the towel holder, TP holder, and install the sconces, but other than that, it's completely finished. We put in about 12 hours on Saturday and another 10 or so on Sunday.
    The stand pipe wasn't as bad as I thought it would be to handle. We cut it off and found out the flange wasn't flush with the tile. A diamond Dremel bit and about 15 minutes later, we had cut out a little bit of the tile around the pipe and it sat perfectly flush. I picked up some diamond tipped core bits and was able to drill 3 holes in the tile for the closet flange before I smoked the bit. We stepped up to a slightly larger size and drilled the 4th. It didn't matter either way since the Tapcons were grabbing the concrete below and not the tile.

    I spent Saturday night at the paint store and picked out colors for everything except the theater. I got the painting done late Saturday and early Sunday morning. Sunday afternoon / evening we sat the toilet, installed the vanity, sink, mirror, marble and took care of all the plumbing.
    It's now officially a usable bathroom.

    Keep an eye on that. The flange is supposed to be installed on top of the finished floor. If the toilet is not completely stable the wax ring seal may break and leak.

    http://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/1243/should-my-toilet-flange-sit-on-top-of-the-backer-board-or-the-tile-of-the-floor#39501

    If it ever gives you trouble, you can just install a flange extension that raises the flange up by a quarter inch or so.

    #141 3 years ago
    Quoted from radium:

    The flange is supposed to be installed on top of the finished floor. If the toilet is not completely stable the wax ring seal may break and leak.

    I'm not sure what you mean? It sits perfectly flat on the tile. I had to remove a little bit of the tile because of the way the flange necked down. The neck was hitting the tile before the flange would sit flat on the tile. Because of that, the flange actually wanted to sit up off the tile about 1/4". We removed a little of the tile to clear the neck so that the flange sits perfectly flat on the tile.

    If you look at the picture I posted above, you can see that it sits flat on the tile.

    #142 3 years ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    I'm not sure what you mean? It sits perfectly flat on the tile. I had to remove a little bit of the tile because of the way the flange necked down. The neck was hitting the tile before the flange would sit flat on the tile. Because of that, the flange actually wanted to sit up off the tile about 1/4". We removed a little of the tile to clear the neck so that the flange sits perfectly flat on the tile.
    If you look at the picture I posted above, you can see that it sits flat on the tile.

    Sorry, I thought you meant the top was flush with the tile. Just went through a nightmare at my house because someone did that, subfloor was completely rotted.

    #143 3 years ago
    Quoted from radium:

    Sorry, I thought you meant the top was flush with the tile. Just went through a nightmare at my hou :Dse because someone did that, subfloor was completely rotted.

    No worries.

    The odd thing is that finding the answer to if it should be flush with the top of the tile or sit flush on the tile, is a difficult thing to find. The Internet seems to be split right down the middle. I searched a good bit before I was convinced that it should sit flush on top of the tile. One of the selling points was actually the same picture you linked to above.

    #144 3 years ago

    We finished the bar on Saturday and then had a short day on Sunday installing the last "normal" door. I say normal, because the theater door will most likely weigh about 200+lbs and need a custom built 8" jam.

    We also spent some time on Sunday caulking the trim in the game room and dealing with the nail holes in the doors. The game room is completely done except for paint, floor and lights.

    Here is the finished bar. You can see the door to the electrical panel / networking closet in the background. In the first picture, you can see the flooring that goes in the bar area. I think the light flooring will go great with the dark wood and the dark gray I have picked out for the trim.

    The pictures don't really do the reclaimed lumber justice.

    IMG_1630 (resized).JPG

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    Now I just need to pull about $15-18k out of my (FillInTheBlank) for flooring, cabinets and solid surfaces and the main sections will be done. Then another $20k for the theater and I'm all set. Anyone have a rich uncle?

    #145 3 years ago

    I have a rich uncle, but he's tighter than a superband

    #146 3 years ago

    While I'm waiting for my bank account to recover, I thought I would start working on the riser in the theater. We skipped working on Saturday due to the show in York and only worked on Sunday.

    Layout took about 2 hours, then another 1.5h in Home Depot picking out lumber, looking at low voltage riser lighting, etc. Finished up about 11pm last night and got it completely framed.

    I'm waiting on step lights from Amazon and then I can run the wire for both the lighting and the outlets for the chairs.

    The riser, when finished, will be 10" high unless I decided to do a second layer of T&G 3/4" OSB on top. I'm not sure if I'll need to extra 3/4" or not.

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    #147 3 years ago

    Thanks for posting the information regarding your riser. It provided confirmation. I am installing a 12" riser including two (2) layers of 3/4" strand board. I want the "floor" to be rock solid since all seats will have Buttkicker's.

    #148 3 years ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    While I'm waiting for my bank account to recover, I thought I would start working on the riser in the theater. We skipped working on Saturday due to the show in York and only worked on Sunday.
    Layout took about 2 hours, then another 1.5h in Home Depot picking out lumber, looking at low voltage riser lighting, etc. Finished up about 11pm last night and got it completely framed.
    I'm waiting on step lights from Amazon and then I can run the wire for both the lighting and the outlets for the chairs.
    The riser, when finished, will be 10" high unless I decided to do a second layer of T&G 3/4" OSB on top. I'm not sure if I'll need to extra 3/4" or not.

    Are you going to put insulation in it to get some sound deadening?

    #149 3 years ago
    Quoted from fordtudoor:

    Thanks for posting the information regarding your riser. It provided confirmation. I am installing a 12" riser including two (2) layers of 3/4" strand board. I want the "floor" to be rock solid since all seats will have Buttkicker's.

    I decided last night that I'll be going with a second layer of T&G OSB for the same reason. The community consensus is to sandwich either Green Glue or 30lb roofing felt between the two layers. It's only going to cost another $75 for the second layer of OSB if I go with the #30 felt.

    Quoted from MustangPaul:

    Are you going to put insulation in it to get some sound deadening?

    Yes. I'm also going to add false HVAC grates along the back wall and the side wall in hopes that the entire structure will act as a broadband bass trap. That's the reason for the 2" x 8" stringers as opposed to the 2" x 10" that I used to build the perimeter. It allows the entire internal structure to be seen almost as one to the bass as opposed to each cavity being separated. I'm also going to be punching a bunch of 2" diameter holes in the face of the first 2" x 10".

    I was at Home Depot last night looking at vinyl coated finger jointed pine for my screen wall build. That stuff is expensive. I also need to find a source for Linacoustic to cover the front wall behind the screen.

    1 week later
    #150 3 years ago

    We worked on the riser some more over the weekend. I decided that I wanted larger steps than we originally built, so I ripped them apart and made them bigger. We ran the wire for the lighting and the electric for the chairs, then filled the riser with insulation. I found some low priced step lights on Amazon after a good bit of searching. I wanted line voltage so I didn't have to deal with a transformer.

    I also made a trip to Hagerstown Maryland (3h round trip) to pick up some acoustical duct liner. I got 100' of Linacoustic for the walls behind the AT screen and some JM814 for the acoustical panels throughout the room.

    Just need to put the T&G OSB on the riser and that will be done. Then it's on to building the columns and framing for the acoustical panels and wall coverings.

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    $ 7.50
    Playfield - Decals
    Pinball Haus
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 75.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Whitewater pinball mods
    $ 28.00
    £ 37.00
    Lighting - Led
    PinballToys
    $ 94.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 156.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 35.00
    Cabinet - Other
    Arcade Upkeep
    From: € 17.00
    Flipper Parts
    Buthamburg
    $ 269.00
    Cabinet - Other
    PinGraffix Pinside Shop
    From: $ 19.50
    Apparel - Unisex
    ArcadeMade
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