(Topic ID: 208174)

Future Spa: Father and Son's Second Restoration [COMPLETE]


By jsa

1 year ago



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#151 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

Thanks! As we repair these runs, we'll put the backbox horizontal. Unfortunately, given the way/timing and pot life of the clear (about 2 hours before it's unusable), we couldn't figure out a way to do one side at a time without wasting a ton of clear...maybe we should have just done it one side at a time. Too late now. I have been watching others do it vertically, and you're right, the artisan experience counts here. Watching @high_end_pins do this without any fear is amazing. That's what an accomplished automotive painter brings to the table with this!

Put the cab in your rotisserie.

Spray one side face up including 1/2 the coin door, wait 15 minutes, flip it to the other side.

Most 2PAC has a 2 hour pot life and a 10 minute set up.

#152 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Put the cab in your rotisserie.
Spray one side face up including 1/2 the coin door, wait 15 minutes, flip it to the other side.
Most 2PAC has a 2 hour pot life and a 10 minute set up.

That makes perfect sense. We will do that for now on.

#153 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

That makes perfect sense. We will do that for now on.

Now, presuming I don't have a rotisserie set up with enough umph for a cabinet, I can't set it on the clear for probably a few hours, correct? Simple solution to that is build a cabinet-ready rotisserie for the next project.

For now, I have to shoot the repair on only one side, so we're good.

#154 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Put the cab in your rotisserie.
Spray one side face up including 1/2 the coin door, wait 15 minutes, flip it to the other side.
Most 2PAC has a 2 hour pot life and a 10 minute set up.

What's a rotisserie look like that can hold a cabinet? I can't figure out where/how that would attach

#155 1 year ago
Quoted from radium:

What's a rotisserie look like that can hold a cabinet? I can't figure out where/how that would attach

There are a couple of threads here on it. You have to make it differently, obviously. Most I've seen will screw into existing holes in the coin door area, though I'm not sure how the back is handled.

#156 1 year ago

When vid1900 is right, he's right. Laid them flat. Other than a couple bugs that just love clear coat, I think this is coming out just fine:

IMG_1643.JPG

IMG_1642.JPG

That clear dries to look eggshell/matte finish.

Honestly, while the colors aren't happening right in this photo, you can get the idea. Seems to be coming together nicely.

IMG_1641.JPG

#157 1 year ago

Nothing like waking up in the morning to a finished paint job. Oh we're so glad this is over! Time to take the paint booth down.

IMG_1644.JPG

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#158 1 year ago

You guys are doing a great job. Really enjoying seeing the progress.

Marc

#159 1 year ago
Quoted from radium:

What's a rotisserie look like that can hold a cabinet? I can't figure out where/how that would attach

Just a regular playfield rotisserie.

Put a cross bar across the inside of the coin door opening using the existing bolt holes.

Run drywall screws into the backside (easy holes to plug).

Remember the bottom is heavier than the top, so the balance point is closer to the bottom

#160 1 year ago

Nice job! Appreciate your taking the time to document and share all the hard work.

#161 1 year ago

This meets the father and son seal of approval.

0F406EEE-B63E-4CBD-BE8B-9978A3C55E0A.jpeg

#162 1 year ago

This is inspiring. I’ve been in the hobby for nearly 20yrs, but have only stenciled several vid cabinets. Used oil based, and quite pleased. I feel like there’s no way I’ll replicate the old process exactly, probably lacquer on barely primered wood, metal stencils, etc. at this point, and especially after this, I think I’m moving to lacquer automotive paint, like the Duplicolor line. I have several classic Bally’s to restore and repaint, incl Future Spa, SBM, Playboy, KISS. Since so many with white base coat, will make more sense to buy enough to do several cabinets. Your cabinet may not be exactly the original process, but this seems like a great compromise using modern paints. I appreciate you sharing your tips. I look forward to my Future Spa project, but kinda wish I just had THAT cabinet!

#163 1 year ago
Quoted from Joey_N:

This is inspiring. I’ve been in the hobby for nearly 20yrs, but have only stenciled several vid cabinets. Used oil based, and quite pleased. I feel like there’s no way I’ll replicate the old process exactly, probably lacquer on barely primered wood, metal stencils, etc. at this point, and especially after this, I think I’m moving to lacquer automotive paint, like the Duplicolor line. I have several classic Bally’s to restore and repaint, incl Future Spa, SBM, Playboy, KISS. Since so many with white base coat, will make more sense to buy enough to do several cabinets. Your cabinet may not be exactly the original process, but this seems like a great compromise using modern paints. I appreciate you sharing your tips. I look forward to my Future Spa project, but kinda wish I just had THAT cabinet!

Thank you so much! Yes, they used metal stencils in the factory, which had some great advantages for sure. That being said, their process back then was anything but exact. If you look at two of the same title from that era you'll often find subtle differences. Maybe that's a good thing!

Actually, as long as I'm at it, let me dump here our lessons learned during this automotive painting experience...while it's still in my head. With our BoP, it was a totally different type of challenge. This was really a whole new level.

*** I'm just going to rattle on for a bit, so feel free to skip unless you're really into the idea using automotive paints with stencils. I'm not trying to convince you not to do it! The end results are really beautiful. Since we're amateurs, we had to basically learn all this stuff on the fly...now we know way too much about paint. ***

- *Same chemistry.* You have to keep your paint choices consistent. Once you're committed (i.e. going with rattle cans, or auto paints), you should really stay on that path.

- The sanding vs. direct application Catch-22. Whenever you re-coat or apply a different layer on top of an existing paint, you've got two options:

1) You can recoat or add another color or clear coat quickly according to the label, so you don't require sanding. For example, these automotive paints usually said on the label you can do it within 24 hours without sanding (depending on the paint, sometimes they said within 3 hours!).

The problem with this approach is that if you do it too soon, the next stencils or masking will leave a mark when pulled off. There is a term in the automotive paint literature that says "Dust Time, Tack Time, Tape Time." Meaning, when dust won't stick, when it won't be tacky to the touch, and when it's safe to be taped (or sticky stenciled).

2) You can wait, in theory over 24 hours, sometimes 72 for clear, and then hit it with 600 or 800 grit to prepare it. The problem with this approach is that with stencils, you're not painting over EVERYTHING, that's the point, so if you sand everything, you need some kind of clear to restore the sheen. Most folks don't clear their cabinets, so you're pretty much stuck in option 1 unless you're cool with clear coating, as we were. (Well, cool is a stretch, we wanted to use clear, but we never had before so we found it terrifying.)

Once you decide to use clear, it liberates you from this Catch-22, and sanding becomes normal between layers.

- The stencils themselves (I really enjoyed the precision of Pimball Pimp's stencils) are a recreation of what the artist thinks was the original stencils. They aren't exactly the same. You often find yourself moving the stencil back and forth before sticking them down and wondering "why doesn't this look exactly like the photo of my cabinet before I sanded the paint off?" and you'll drive yourself nuts! Partly this is because not all machines were the same. Another issue is sometimes the stencils have been improved from the originals. They look better. Just chill out and go with it. OR, do like @high_end_pins does and fix the stencils to what you want. If you do that, you're going to need some talent.

- When a stencil has little pieces like with Future Spa's front of the cabinet, when you're laying them down, you might miss a small piece that stays stuck to the backing. Just relax, it's probably easier to manually place it down after then to try to go back with your squeegee and push it back down. I wish we had just applied it manually. If you get too anxious or fumble fingered during the stencil re-application, you might get a crease in the stencil. Not a horrible thing, mostly can be pushed out, but we found that a few couldn't and they would allow a tiny amount of paint to bleed through. These will then need to be corrected.

- Get ready to make lots of corrections, mostly from issues with edges pushing through. Look, maybe with rattle cans or small airbrushes you guys can be perfect on your first shot. However, I don't think I've read a thread on a single automotive paint restoration where they aren't fixing up things at various stencil layers. Some paint goes on wrong, something bleeds, a stencil got left on the backing, stuff happens. HVLP guns are weird. You've got pressure at the compressor. Pressure at the gun. Pressure when you trigger. Nozzle size. Atomization issues. Sweet lord. Anyway things go wrong but if you're doing clear coat layers they are easy to correct.

- In our amateur spray booth, overspray happens, period. Maybe if we had chosen to use more powerful exit fans or something it would have been better, but I doubt it. That's fine, you deal with it, but you have to spend 10x as much time masking everything perfectly. A small hole in the mask is too large. Paint vapor or clear gets in, and may alter your surface.

- Layers and clear coat order. We regret not using clear between stencil layers. We chose to do it like this: Primer, base color layer, speckle, gloss clear, stencil layer 1, stencil layer 2, gloss clear we could then sand and flatten, matte clear to finish. Here are two reasons I see why you should use layers of clear between stencil coats, now having used these paints ourselves.

1) The clear gives you something to sand down, filling the valleys, allowing your surface to be flat. Remember, when you go to stencil layer 2, you want to lay it down on a flat surface. Auto paints can lay down very thick! Single stage even thicker (you really shouldn't be using single stage, because the whole point of single stage is it has it's own clear in it, so it's thicker. Avoid this. We had to for color reasons that I won't bore you with here). You can see the issue, because if you keep layering up without flattening, you get really high edges and you can get some bleed in the transitions where new stencil pieces go over those edges.

2) The clear is very forgiving, paint is not. If you screw up glossy clear, you can sand it and buff it and you're good. If you sand too far on a stenciled paint, exposing the paint beneath it (base coat or previous layer), you then have to correct that mistake before the next layer. IMHO, you shouldn't be sanding on your color. Remember, auto paints are expensive and are 2 or 3 part mixes. Some have a pot life of two hours, sometimes, properly stored, it can last infinitely. Our purple paint, for example, if we made corrections, we had to mix more...and that starts to add up quickly. Hell, if you sand your color, and it's not something that is covered up by the next stencil layer, that scuff remains unless you clear over it.

For this reason, putting a layer of clear over your paint "locks it in" and lets you sand it without hitting the paint. It also provides a good surface to paint onto! It has to be glossy clear though, so you can sand it and manipulate it.

Then, you're probably wondering, once the stenciling is finished, how do you get that eggshell level of matte finish like the original Bally cabinets had? The answer is that flattening agent.

- Flattening agent. Oh my $@^%&#! is flattening agent a pain in the ass. You add it to your clear, and it cures with a lower sheen, depending on how much you add. It's also really expensive. You don't want to waste it. I've heard you can buy pre-mixed stuff for even more money, but if you want to stick to your chemistry rule above, it's nice to use the same clear coat. Your measurement needs to be precise for each coat or session, so they all have the same gloss level. If you are a pro like @high_end_pins, my guess is you have a paint scale that lets you measure portions precisely. We used mixing cups. The instructions for the flattening agent include things like "437 parts clear coat to 454 parts flattening agent to 144 parts hardener." Seriously!? We ended up getting lucky and using a 3:3 (clear:flattening agent:hardener) for eggshell. Ok, that you can use mixing cups for, but if you want to get fancy, you need better measuring tools.

- If you lay your flattened/matte clear down and make a mistake, you can't sand/buff it out. You have one option: Sand and re-apply the flattened clear...and because it might be a wee bit different the next session, you really can't "spot spray" it over a mistake, you have to sand it out (like a run, which we had on one side) and then apply to the whole side. For a run, you'll need some lower grit (like 320) to get it flat then hit it with 600 before re-coating. For something else, YMMV. Don't make mistakes with the final clear layer.

- If you get overspray at the flattened clear stage, it sucks, because you can't really sand it. (For reference: If you get matte clear coat overspray on something, something that already had a matte clear coat, it will look the same, but lose its smooth texture. Try not to do this. A trick that can work (if you do it within a couple days) is a clay bar with lubricant. We had this handy because I use it to detail my car, but we fortunately masked things pretty well.)

- Clear coat is expensive and *toxic as hell.* When @vid1900 tells you to have proper safety gear, holy crap, even with California's VOC standards, it's some nasty stuff. You ABSOLUTELY need a P100-rated organic vapor respirator cartridge! This is the one:

amazon.com link »

- If I could do this all again, I'd probably get a full face respirator to use it with instead of my half-face respirator. You end up with a clear coat triangles on your face. This is not healthy. The whole thing blows my mind that people do this professionally! Yeah, I can TOTALLY see the appeal of working with rattle cans after having spent a couple months in a Tyvek suit.

What's the punchline here? When @bryan_kelly talks about getting good performance out of rattle cans, listen to him, unless you want this challenge. It sure does look pretty though...

#164 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

Yeah, I can TOTALLY see the appeal of working with rattle cans after having spent a couple months in a Tyvek suit.

Even rattle cans are super toxic (Xylene, Toluene and MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone).

Do not EVER get rattle can paint on your skin!

#165 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Even rattle cans are super toxic (Xylene, Toluene and MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone).
Do not EVER get rattle can paint on your skin!

I invested in good gloves, but wouldn't you know it, when applying the paint speckle, I take off all my gear to have dinner, and my index finger is COVERED with 1-hr old metallic silver car paint. It's in my cuticle, it's all over the place. I had no idea the rubber glove was broken.

I'm thinking that rubber nitrile gloves aren't good enough or you should be super careful if you use them like I did. I like them because you change them a lot, but man, that was hysterical. It came off with other poison, at least.

#166 1 year ago

Freshly cleaned wiring harnesses:

IMG_1811.JPG

Upon investigation after cleaning, you notice things. My intent is to replace all the connectors, but before I do, I look for things that might be hints as to issues with the game.

I noticed this burnt set of connectors where the backbox harness plugs into the rectifier board. Note the three burnt pins have no wires coming out of them, it's like they've been clipped:

IMG_1812.JPG

Also, I noticed that this connector also located near the transformer has two clipped wires:

IMG_1813.JPG

Here's what they looked like in-situ in the game before the teardown:

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IMG_0159.JPG

Any thoughts anyone as to why these wires are clipped and what is going on?

#167 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

Any thoughts anyone as to why these wires are clipped and what is going on?

Crappy servicemen would just solder the wires directly to the board or test points, rather than take 2 seconds and reterminate the connections.

Many Bally female plastic connectors are no longer available, so re-pin the wires, and put them back into the old connectors.

The 12v is often burned off, and the GI connections are often cooked.

They were simply under-speced for how much current was required to flow through them.

Here are some tips on repinning the boards and connectors :

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-quick-bally-driver-board-repair-bulletproofing/page/2#post-2113931

#168 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

I invested in good gloves, but wouldn't you know it, when applying the paint speckle, I take off all my gear to have dinner, and my index finger is COVERED with 1-hr old metallic silver car paint. It's in my cuticle, it's all over the place. I had no idea the rubber glove was broken.

At least you were not huffing it.

The metallic paint is the best for mugshots.

gold-paint-huffer-halloween-cost (resized).jpg
#169 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Crappy servicemen would just solder the wires directly to the board or test points, rather than take 2 seconds and reterminate the connections.
Many Bally female plastic connectors are no longer available, so re-pin the wires, and put them back into the old connectors.
The 12v is often burned off, and the GI connections are often cooked.
They were simply under-speced for how much current was required to flow through them.
Here are some tips on repinning the boards and connectors :
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-quick-bally-driver-board-repair-bulletproofing/page/2#post-2113931

It seems it was pin 8, the 12v DC (orange), pin 10, 7v AC (orange), and pin 11, 7v AC (orange). As far as I can tell, that 9 pin molex was added after the fact for precisely what you are thinking. It's just weird because it looks like extra pins were wired in there (including extra ground connections) that have no mate on the other connector:

IMG_1815 (resized).JPG

#170 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Crappy servicemen would just solder the wires directly to the board or test points, rather than take 2 seconds and reterminate the connections.
Many Bally female plastic connectors are no longer available, so re-pin the wires, and put them back into the old connectors.
The 12v is often burned off, and the GI connections are often cooked.
They were simply under-speced for how much current was required to flow through them.
Here are some tips on repinning the boards and connectors :
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-quick-bally-driver-board-repair-bulletproofing/page/2#post-2113931

vid1900 Do the high current crimp connectors play a role in preventing a problem here, like these:

https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=45570-3050

...or is the issue more around poor rectifier board design? I can imagine the pins were under-speced as you say, but what about the connectors themselves?

#171 1 year ago

My best guess is that they spec-ed everything when brand new, to the very limit.

Then as connectors oxidized, sockets oxidized, and pins oxidized, the resistance increased until the current exceeded the specs.

Using LED lighting cuts WAY down on that current, as does using #47 bulbs instead of #44 bulbs if you had to use incandescents.

Using the highest amperage connectors that will fit the sockets will help too.

#172 1 year ago

When we got the machine, everything worked. I looked inside, saw chaos, decided "we'll fix it in post," and moved on.

Time to fix everything!

When desoldering your transformer leads, which by now are not the color they are supposed to be, away from the rectifier board, our system is to label everything with the right hole indicator.

With everything cable tied tightly together, you're likely to melt something. So instead, remove all these little guys.

IMG_1827.JPG

There, now it's all removed and nicely labeled.

IMG_1828.JPG

We'll remove the transformer hardware for cleaning. We throw the hardware in the tumbler.

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We then CAREFULLY clean the surface and the goopy wires, restoring some color back. Next, we'll polish up the back plate, get the hardware back on, and we'll resolder the leads back into our new rectifier board from barakandl.

IMG_1836.JPG

#173 1 year ago

You take apart a coin door, it's like an archaeological expedition. Mostly a lesson in what beer does over 40 years.

Next, OCD takes over, we clean all of this with Purple Power and throw what we can in the tumbler. The rest will get resurfaced and polished.

IMG_1893.JPG

#174 1 year ago

Hey pinball restorers!

Do you too suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder like me? Do you find yourself waking up at night thinking, "did I retrobright enough of my plastic?" Do you clean things that no one will ever see? Do you spend countless hours on details any sane human would ignore?

I've got just the project for you!

Here's how to take the back of a coin door, which no one ever looks at, that is covered with beer sludge and mold, and make something your mom would be proud of!

Start with something disgusting, like this back of a coin door:

start (resized).jpg

Once you discover that the sludge and mold and corrosion doesn't come off by cleaning, hit it with 120 grit:

IMG_1895 (resized).JPG

Then 220 grit:

IMG_1896 (resized).JPG

Then 320 grit:

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Then Scotch Brite:

IMG_1898 (resized).JPG

Then buff with white compound:

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Then green compound:

IMG_1900 (resized).JPG

Now you can delight in details secretly for a part of the machine that no one but you know about! Except your wife, who will cry herself silently to sleep.

#175 1 year ago

I think you have a problem: Anal retentiveness!

I am prescribing a laxative, immediately. Strong dose, for a horse!

Seriously, I hit mine with sand paper (150) and then painted it:

https://images.pinside.com/4/22/422deaf3c09b20e0bc71036885a404f8639bc1fc/resized/large/422deaf3c09b20e0bc71036885a404f8639bc1fc.jpg

Yves

#176 1 year ago
Quoted from Arcane:

I think you have a problem: Anal retentiveness!
I am prescribing a laxative, immediately. Strong dose, for a horse!
Seriously, I hit mine with sand paper (150) and then painted it:
https://images.pinside.com/4/22/422deaf3c09b20e0bc71036885a404f8639bc1fc/resized/large/422deaf3c09b20e0bc71036885a404f8639bc1fc.jpg
Yves

I was considering that, then I remembered the PTSD I'm suffering from my OCD around the cabinet painting, so I went this route instead.

#177 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

Do you clean things that no one will ever see?

Of course. look at the back of my Jackbot bb light board.

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#178 1 year ago

Getting my rectifier put together:

IMG_1901 (resized).JPG

Before I complete the installation of my new rectifier board, I decided to perform a test. I provided power to J2 pin 6 and 7.

TP1 shows 8.21 VDC.
TP2 shows 186 VDC.
TP3 shows 13.45 VDC.
TP4 shows 7.44 VAC.
TP5 shows 46 VDC.

I think this all is good, but should I be concerned about TP1 being greater than 6.4VDC? Any thoughts vid1900 or barakandl ?

#179 1 year ago

No you do not have to worry about this board.

TP1 is measured with no load. Once the load is connected, the voltage will drop.

I just installed one of these NVRAMWEEBLY rectifier board on my Bally Mata Hari. They make a huge difference and you know they will last a long time while providing reliable services, which cannot be said of the original Bally rectifier board. Only drawback, you cannot re-install the plastic shield on top of the bridges, but that may be a good thing as it was impeding the cooling.

Yves

#180 1 year ago

Top notch work fellas! Game is looking great so far. The more I see Future Spa, the more I like it. There were never any around here back in the day.

#181 1 year ago

Looking pretty respectable.

IMG_1906.JPG

#182 1 year ago

So, you used the plastic mounts instead of the bolts and spacers provided with the kit. I prefer the bolts/spacers, as it gives a very sturdy assembly when connecting and disconnecting the large connectors on the board.

https://i1.pinside.com/d/1f/d1f5826b590a9e8521068c85c6b3308c5d176fb5/resized/740/d1f5826b590a9e8521068c85c6b3308c5d176fb5.jpg

Yves

#183 1 year ago
Quoted from Arcane:

So, you used the plastic mounts instead of the bolts and spacers provided with the kit. I prefer the bolts/spacers, as it gives a very sturdy assembly when connecting and disconnecting the large connectors on the board.
https://i1.pinside.com/d/1f/d1f5826b590a9e8521068c85c6b3308c5d176fb5/resized/740/d1f5826b590a9e8521068c85c6b3308c5d176fb5.jpg
Yves

Yeah, I prefer to keep it the way it was. I replaced the mounts with new ones and they are higher pressure and hold it with greater stability. Also, I don't need that much extra space, IMHO.

Honestly, I'm not sure I got spacers with mine anyway, I may have them somewhere.

#184 1 year ago

So cool you and your son are doing this...wish my son was interested in pinball : (
Thank you for taking the time to share your knowledge / experiences.
You're making me wish I'd kept my Future Spa : )

#185 1 year ago

Any thoughts on how to clean scorch marks off the metal backbox sheeting?

#186 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

Any thoughts on how to clean scorch marks off the metal backbox sheeting?

Orbital buffer

#187 1 year ago

Just polishing compound?

#188 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

Any thoughts on how to clean scorch marks off the metal backbox sheeting?

You can also just replace it with a roll of Aluminum flashing from HD. It's in the roofing department.

Or just look around the neighborhood for roofing crew, they will even bend the corners sharply with their Brake.

Nothing a crew of alcoholics like more than $10 beer money.

#189 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

Just polishing compound?

Just go up through the ranks.

Heavy to fine

Might have to sand them out first with 220 or 340

#190 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

You can also just replace it with a roll of Aluminum flashing from HD. It's in the roofing department.
Or just look around the neighborhood for roofing crew, they will even bend the corners sharply with their Brake.
Nothing a crew of alcoholics like more than $10 beer money.

You know, vid1900, I don't know who you are, or where you're from, what secret agency you work for, but you never fail at cracking me the f' up.

#191 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

You know, vid1900, I don't know who you are, or where you're from, what secret agency you work for, but you never fail at cracking me the f' up.

It's not a joke.

All real roofers are alcoholics. They are drinking at 9am.

If you take them the burned up piece, and hand them $10, they will be overjoyed to use the boss's scrap and bend you shiny brand new one.

#192 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

You can also just replace it with a roll of Aluminum flashing from HD. It's in the roofing department.
Or just look around the neighborhood for roofing crew, they will even bend the corners sharply with their Brake.
Nothing a crew of alcoholics like more than $10 beer money.

I've done the same. I found that whatever was available in the store was about 1/2" shorter than what I needed, but not really noticeable. I just clamped it between 2 2x4s and eased the bend over. Would've been easier with a metal brake, but it worked. I'd do that before trying to polish it, doesn't seem worth the effort.

#193 1 year ago
Quoted from vid1900:

It's not a joke.
All real roofers are alcoholics. They are drinking at 9am.

Drinking and working on a roof seems like the wrong mix.

#194 1 year ago
Quoted from lb1:

Drinking and working on a roof seems like the wrong mix.

They are professionals.

#195 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

You know, vid1900, I don't know who you are, or where you're from, what secret agency you work for, but you never fail at cracking me the f' up.

International man of mystery.

#196 1 year ago

The only way i'd get up on the roof would be after a couple beers. If I was sober I'd think twice about climbing up there.

#197 1 year ago

I'm not going to lie, there have been drunk people on my roof. I'm just not ready to say they were roofers. I can confirm that they are members of this forum.

#198 1 year ago
Quoted from jsa:

I'm not going to lie, there have been drunk people on my roof. I'm just not ready to say they were roofers. I can confirm that they are members of this forum.

"Wait, what? I though we were going to do some roofies, not roofing......I gettin' down from here...."

1 week later
#199 1 year ago

Just a preview, we received our restored/clear coated playfield from captainneo this afternoon! We're so happy with this, but to do it proper justice, we need to take some photos in better lighting (skin tones are much lighter and more natural than pictured, pinks/purples much more vivid than what you can see here):

IMG_2111.JPG

IMG_2110.JPG

IMG_2109.JPG

I haven't ever seen a playfield look so perfect. Thanks Neo!

-Jay

#200 1 year ago

Your restoration is looking good.

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