Future Spa: Father and Son's Second Restoration

(Topic ID: 208174)

Future Spa: Father and Son's Second Restoration


By jsa

6 months ago



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#101 79 days ago
Quoted from Jjsmooth:

The fans should be pulling air out only. And pulling air thru the filters.. should be no positive pressure at all.

That's the debate right there. There are positive pressure and negative pressure booths. There are pros and cons to either way.

The main reason you want a booth to be positive pressure is to avoid sucking in any particulate from bad seals. If you have great seals, and you're confident, you can do either way and not take any risks.

The main reason you want something in between would be to push air over the spray surface, so slight positive pressure.

The main reason you want negative is if you can move air faster out of the booth than into the booth, which also achieves the above result, depending on air velocity.

As this is an amateur operation, we chose positive pressure so it would keep it clean, and it's working great for that.

You can't put box fans as exit fans with automotive paints because the fumes can spark and create an explosion. However, you can build a baffle (out of cardboard) that would "catch" enough of it that makes it safer. Though once you start having to mess with all that, it makes me think you ought to build something that's better than pvc and plastic tarps.

#102 79 days ago

A couple thin coats of Omni MC760 clear.

Note, we're not going for a gloss look, this is just a intermediary step. When we're done, we'll use a matte clear as the final coat. This clear is to set the speckle and surfaces that will be getting stencils. Everything cleared here will get sanded with 800 grit and cleaned prior to stencils or final coats. If we sanded without the clear, we would risk sanding off the speckle or cutting too deep into the base color.

It would be nice if we could do this step with matte clear as well, but unfortunately the matte additive, when sanded, will cloud up and mess up the colors. You can't sand matte-adjusted clear. So, a few glossy shots before the next step, sanding and stenciling.

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#103 79 days ago

I use automatic paints and clears in my work. I've never used a paint booth. I do all my painting in the driveway in the morning before the wind comes up....sometimes the afternoon if there is no wind. As you know, the paints dry in minutes. The clears take just a few minutes longer to set. Seldom do I have any issues with dust, and if I do, they can be sanded out in the paint or polished out of the clears. If you are applying a speckle or web over the base, that will hide most blemishes anyway.

#104 79 days ago
Quoted from JethroP:

I use automatic paints and clears in my work. I've never used a paint booth. I do all my painting in the driveway in the morning before the wind comes up....sometimes the afternoon if there is no wind. As you know, the paints dry in minutes. The clears take just a few minutes longer to set. Seldom do I have any issues with dust, and if I do, they can be sanded out in the paint or polished out of the clears. If you are applying a speckle or web over the base, that will hide most blemishes anyway.

Our home is a little weird in that the pollen is so over the top, if you wash your car, twenty minutes later you get a fine yellow dust on it. I did the last restoration in the driveway and it was ok, but we needed an upgrade.

#105 78 days ago
Quoted from jsa:

Our home is a little weird in that the pollen is so over the top, if you wash your car, twenty minutes later you get a fine yellow dust on it. I did the last restoration in the driveway and it was ok, but we needed an upgrade.

This is California and Marin too. Your neighbor may not be thrilled to see you shooting auto paint and clear out in the open. Your booth will pay off big time for the playfield clear.

I tried the "out in the back yard" approach for clear. Not a great idea. Even with no wind, some dust ended up in the clear. When it's between two coats, you can't easily sand and polish it out.

I actually shot the exact same bright white paint and clear but on a Toyota fender. Luckily it wasn't meant to be a high-end job but just a quick fender bender fix because in the 10-15 minutes it took, some small bug found its way in the clear.

Really nice job on the restoration. This will turn out beautiful.

#106 78 days ago

Very fun game, lots to shot at .
Great work , keep the pics coming .

Here a pic of mine at Canada Pincon last year
Was restored a few years ago

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#107 75 days ago

Ok, here's some more interesting things we learned.

You may recall that we chose to follow the high_end_pins method and shoot a intermediary gloss clear over the base coat and speckling.

I completely get why he does this now.

The speckle, once it dries on the base coat, literally feel like bugs stuck in the paint. The drops are sometimes pretty flat, but often are not. I don't think it matters how they are applied (via a under-pressured HVLP or with the toothbrush), this is the case.

If you were to sand those flat, you'll end up just pulling most of it off and losing that work.

Instead, we shot base coat, speckle, then a couple coats of gloss clear.

Next, we sanded with 800 grit (this is debated, I've head everything from 320 to 1000, YMMV). This took the surface to a glass smooth level. Now it's in much better shape to receive stencils and keep straight lines/prevent bleeding on the next step.

This being said, imagine our surprise to see this:

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If you look closely, you'll see that after hitting it with 800, and believe me it's smooth to the touch, you can see some gloss clear getting left behind precisely along the original grain. Mind you, you could not see any of these grains/lines before the sanding!

I'm sure it's fine, after doing coats of stenciled colors followed by a matte clear coat, this shouldn't be visible. Still, is this weird? At first we thought it might be orange peel being left behind, but that's clearly following the grain. Interesting, right?

#108 75 days ago

I think the clear always sinks into the grain of the wood or any micro-crevasses there may be. In addition, by sanding the upper surface, you created a contrast that makes the lower levels of the clear coat more obvious. It is just a theory...

If you look at pinball machines from the late 70's or early 80's, they were never slick and smooth or intended to look like a glass surface. That trend to turn every poor quality wood box to look like a metal box or a marble coffin is ludicrous in my opinion.

Yves

#109 74 days ago
Quoted from Arcane:

I think the clear always sinks into the grain of the wood or any micro-crevasses there may be. In addition, by sanding the upper surface, you created a contrast that makes the lower levels of the clear coat more obvious. It is just a theory...
If you look at pinball machines from the late 70's or early 80's, they were never slick and smooth or intended to look like a glass surface. That trend to turn every poor quality wood box to look like a metal box or a marble coffin is ludicrous in my opinion.
Yves

The whole point of shooting a webbing or speckles is to hide the defects. I would never shoot a gloss or semi gloss on a pinball restoration (except for a playfield). It wasn't done at the factory for the reasons you are observing...it brings out underlying defects. You would only want to cover your base/speckles with a matte or satin clear so your sticky stencils won't lift the speckles/webbing. Of course in the factory they didn't use sticky stencils so they didn't use any clears. The factory used reusable metal (or wood) stencils. You're doing a beautiful job!!

#110 74 days ago
Quoted from Arcane:

I think the clear always sinks into the grain of the wood or any micro-crevasses there may be. In addition, by sanding the upper surface, you created a contrast that makes the lower levels of the clear coat more obvious. It is just a theory...
If you look at pinball machines from the late 70's or early 80's, they were never slick and smooth or intended to look like a glass surface. That trend to turn every poor quality wood box to look like a metal box or a marble coffin is ludicrous in my opinion.

I agree with your sentiment, Yves. As this is a restoration, our goal is to get the machine to what it may have looked like new, if not a little better. Even the cabinet, as it arrived, was smooth to the touch and not showing grain, so I wouldn't try to do much more than that. The purpose of this step is not to create a glossy, glass-like surface for the final product. It's to help with stenciling.

Quoted from JethroP:

The whole point of shooting a webbing or speckles is to hide the defects. I would never shoot a gloss or semi gloss on a pinball restoration (except for a playfield). It wasn't done at the factory for the reasons you are observing...it brings out underlying defects. You would only want to cover your base/speckles with a matte or satin clear so your sticky stencils won't lift the speckles/webbing. Of course in the factory they didn't use sticky stencils so they didn't use any clears. The factory used reusable metal (or wood) stencils. You're doing a beautiful job!!

This layer of clear is unaltered gloss but is there only to set the speckles so they don't get lifted with the stencils. We can't shoot matte clear because it doesn't take well to being sanded (creates a cloudy base once sanded). However, once this is done, we will shoot the whole surface with a matte clear to make the gloss level consistently matte. You won't even be able to tell it's been clear coated. So yes, this is purely for stenciling...and also to help get the surface similar to how it looked/felt before.

1 week later
#111 67 days ago

We went through a lot of work to get the cabinet masked in preparation for applying the stencils. Unfortunately, we were using yellow (low adhesion) frog tape, and it just started coming up after a certain point.

I like the yellow because it leaves zero residue, but clearly it's not good for holding paper to a surface very long.

3M makes their various types of Scotch Blue tapes, we're probably going to re-do the whole preparation using yellow Frog for something with a sharp line (like a corner), and the blue for holding masking paper. Any tips/wisdom?

#112 66 days ago

I use the 3M blue tape for everything. It does not leave any residue either and is just sticky enough, especially if you use a spray gun to paint your cabinet.
For long term masking, it barely does the job, though.

Yves

#113 66 days ago

I too use the 3M tape (I believe it is also branded Scotch tape). But you should know that there is a premium version of the Blue tape. It has orange little accents in the packaging and I believe it is called EdgeLock. I swear by this stuff. Great clean edges when painting, long lasting adhesion, and no residue after.

Edit: here is a pic

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#114 66 days ago
Quoted from Elicash:

I too use the 3M tape (I believe it is also branded Scotch tape). But you should know that there is a premium version of the Blue tape. It has orange little accents in the packaging and I believe it is called EdgeLock. I swear by this stuff. Great clean edges when painting, long lasting adhesion, and no residue after.
Edit: here is a pic

Thanks... that's the key, the good stuff. I think that is the Scotch I have successfully used in the past. I'm guessing it's closer to green FrogTape. The yellow is my problem: Probably great for very low tac applications (maybe playfield?) but won't stay stuck long enough for my needs.

#115 65 days ago

Cabinets masked in anticipation of stencils. Stencils that are against edges will get "married" to the tape prior to painting.

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In this case we've moved to FrogTape green (medium adhesion) for anything taped to the paint. For tape to tape or tape to paper we're using 3M green, which is high adhesion. I'm much happier with this.

#116 65 days ago

Looks like it's time to change your filters before you start to paint.

#117 65 days ago

Prepping stencils. This involves trimming them. First, we make sure the stencil fits properly...this is mostly for the head/backbox because these early Bally's have a raised edge along the front.

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We use a straight edge and a new blade to cut into this. We've triple checked to make sure we're not hitting any artwork (and we're leaving necessary registration marks exposed).

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We're cross referencing photography. There's a certain amount of restorer's license going on here, deciding what edge to favor and what looks best. For the cabinet sides, we opted to favor the bottom edge, so that the artwork gets pushed up above the lower line of the rails. We noticed that when we removed the rails, there was less than 1/4" of overlap (if you zoom in, you can see the unfaded strip of pink), and that was awfully close...It would be horrible if we finished this and the rails didn't properly overlap the artwork! Instead, we're going for the lower details and pushing art upwards.

A reminder, this is the original:

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I find it interesting that the stencils leave a white area for under the rails. You're just inviting a mistake there, I think.

Ok, next step, we apply the stencils. We're waiting until the morning of painting because we don't know how long these stencils like to be adhered and don't want to take any chances.

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Ok, next step, applying these guys!

#118 65 days ago
Quoted from MustangPaul:

Looks like it's time to change your filters before you start to paint.

Perhaps, they seem to do the basic job of keeping dust from coming in during the painting and keeping paint inside. I'll make sure they have enough air flow before jumping in.

#119 65 days ago

Have cotton swabs (for your ears) and Naphta handy, when removing the stencils.

I am in the process of re-painting my Mata Hari and have saved the situation multiple times, in case of excess paint, leaks under the stencils or paint too dry when you pull the stencils.

Dip the cotton swab in Naphta (just a drop) and very delicately approach it to the mistake: the cotton fiber will suck the excess of paint, while Naphta dilutes it.

Good luck.

Yves

#120 65 days ago
Quoted from Arcane:

Have cotton swabs (for your ears) and Naphta handy, when removing the stencils.
I am in the process of re-painting my Mata Hari and have saved the situation multiple times, in case of excess paint, leaks under the stencils or paint too dry when you pull the stencils.
Dip the cotton swab in Naphta (just a drop) and very delicately approach it to the mistake: the cotton fiber will suck the excess of paint, while Naphta dilutes it.
Good luck.
Yves

Do you feel this will work well with automotive paints? I had a really rough time fixing mistakes during the speckling. Also, what type of stencils did you use?

#121 65 days ago

Same stencils as yours: Pimball Pimp. They are fragile and very sticky...be careful. Small details can remain glued to the backing paper.
I have no clue what you need to remove automotive paint. I would use the same thinner as what you use to clean your spray gun. The trick is the cotton fibers sucking the excess of paint.

Yves

#122 65 days ago
Quoted from Arcane:

Same stencils as yours: Pimball Pimp. They are fragile and very sticky...be careful. Small details can remain glued to the backing paper.
I have no clue what you need to remove automotive paint. I would use the same thinner as what you use to clean your spray gun. The trick is the cotton fibers sucking the excess of paint.
Yves

I use mineral spirits, though lacquer thinner also cleans it up quickly.

Our biggest fear is the timing. Automotive paints set really quickly and are dry within ten minutes. For this reason, we will set up all the stencils for one color. We'll hit the entire head and cab for 2 to 3 coats, then immediately remove the stencils. Stressful.

#123 65 days ago

I have used the Pinball Pimp stencils as well. I found it was best to do one side at a time so I could peel off the stencil at the right cure point (spray cans though, not automotive). It takes a while to pull the stencil off without part of it laying into fresh paint on you. I also spend quite a while with Naptha and a cue tip sitting on a stable stool touching up any little paint strings that occurred. I would say from spraying to finished with stencil removed is a full hour. In my case, 2-3 light colour coats, maybe 10 minutes cure, and 20 minutes pulling stencil, then cue tip fixes. Even on a head I stopped trying to do both sides in once session.

Honestly I preferred the material from the dreaded Twisted Pins guys but the quality of the cuts are far superior on the Pinball Pimp ones.

#124 64 days ago

I completely agree with BJM-Maxx. I just finished the front of the Mata Hari cabinet and honestly, I do not know how I could have done more..... The paint would be completely dry by the time I finished pulling the stencils.
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Unless you are an expert with access to many small hands to help you, I would limit myself to one pane at a time. Of course, the Mata Hari design is quite complicated and requires a lot of care to remove the stencils. I am glad I can use the cotton swab and may have to do some touch-ups with a small brush.

Yves

#125 64 days ago

A great many things learned today!

First, we applied stencils.

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Where stencil material met an edge (where there was no painting), we made sure to extend into the mask:

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Ultimately, I have to agree with all of you, Pinball Pimp's stencils here applied fantastic. We took some tips from others, and covered the "X" registration marks with masking, so our opaque paint wouldn't obscure it.

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All stencils applied and ready to go:

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We used Delfleet Essential automotive paint. This is a 6 to 1 to 1 mix ratio and dries solid in about 30-40 minutes. My mistake, the other automotive paint I used for the base was Omni MBX, which dries much faster. At a high level, the stencils worked great and fairly happy with the results:

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There were some great outcomes:

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...and some HORRIBLE outcomes. You can't imagine how upset this made me... it was 100% my fault, I forgot to adjust the pressure on the first spray (yes, I tested it first, but failed to pay close enough attention). We'll have to sand this out.

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In terms of when to remove the stencils, because we thought this was going to dry in 5-10 minutes, we began removing the stencils off one side of the cabinet really quickly (15 minutes) after application. we quickly realized this was a mistake. The paint was extremely sticky, and would sometimes stretch or string. It still kept the edges and lines as we wanted, but those lines are far rougher/more raised.

In contrast, we started the second side of the cabinet about 1 hour after application. All the lines were clean and no lifting or stretching. For paints like this, I recommend waiting for the initial cure time before removing, not when wet or sticky. Because the base coat was cleared and solid, there was no base lifting either, though the material from Pinball Pimp seemed unlikely to do that.

By the time we got to the head, the paint felt like the surface of a car, and yet it still came off cleanly. We used a pair of tweezers and an Xacto knife to get to the pieces.

As for those paint runs, I'm hoping I can just sand them down before the next stencil layer. Once the next stencil is finished, we'll do any touchups...and depending on how ambitious we are, we'll probably do some regular clear to level out the lines, sand, and do a matte clear to finish it off.

#126 63 days ago

Sanded out the runs. This stuff sands out fine. I'm using this Delfleet Essential only because it was the only paint manufactured that made the color close to what I want.

It turns out that DuPont made these crazy colors (like the original Future Spa) back in the 70's, and stopped for some reason (I'm guessing it wasn't particularly good for you). To match bright neons, you're better off with things like Createx Airbrush colors vs. automotive paint. Still, we got what we wanted.

It's called Delfleet because it's targeting fleet painting, meaning a lot of cars in a short amount of time. It's a base and clear, so it dries super glossy. If you sand it, it's because you know you're going to clear over it. We can hit it with naptha and tell it's retained its color.

Another thing I learned today: Another good reason to shoot a coat of clearcoat after a stencil layer is for sanding purposes. If you sand around the edges, and it's high contrast (say, pink and bright white), the pink dust can grind in a bit to the top layer of the white. It cleans off with naptha and a little elbow grease, but you can see how having a layer of clear in there would avoid sanding actual color and achieve similar results.

We couldn't do that because we were fixing the runs. When we were done, we hit all the cab with 800 to knock the edges down a bit in anticipation of the stencils. We're nervous that the paint edges are so high that we may see some bleed through the stencil material.

#127 63 days ago

Stencils ready, prepped for purple. It's about 58℉ outside this afternoon so we'll just have to wait for warmer weather or we'll get more runs.

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I've got to say, these Pinball Pimp stencils are pretty impressive. I don't see any way around enhancing them a bit by adding some masking tape to extend the stencils over the bevel. Otherwise, you would end up with a colored outline around the edge, and we didn't get this far by letting that happen.

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Does anyone know if you can do touch ups with automotive paint without the HVLP, maybe with a traditional airbrush? We're happy to mask and shoot touch ups, though the clean up is the same as if you're doing a large area and quite a pain.

#128 62 days ago
Quoted from jsa:

Stencils ready, prepped for purple. It's about 58℉ outside this afternoon so we'll just have to wait for warmer weather or we'll get more runs.

I've got to say, these Pinball Pimp stencils are pretty impressive. I don't see any way around enhancing them a bit by adding some masking tape to extend the stencils over the bevel. Otherwise, you would end up with a colored outline around the edge, and we didn't get this far by letting that happen.

Does anyone know if you can do touch ups with automotive paint without the HVLP, maybe with a traditional airbrush? We're happy to mask and shoot touch ups, though the clean up is the same as if you're doing a large area and quite a pain.

Yes, you can touch up with siphon feed or airbrush. I've touched up with a hand brush too. If you don't like your touchup, it's easy to sand down and start over. I like the fast dry for that purpose.

#129 62 days ago
Quoted from JethroP:

Yes, you can touch up with siphon feed or airbrush. I've touched up with a hand brush too. If you don't like your touchup, it's easy to sand down and start over. I like the fast dry for that purpose.

Maybe a finer point on the question: If I shoot automotive paint with the HVLP, and switch to a small airbrush for touch up, will it blend properly? As long the the atomization via the HVLP doesn't actually create a different color.

#130 62 days ago
Quoted from jsa:

Maybe a finer point on the question: If I shoot automotive paint with the HVLP, and switch to a small airbrush for touch up, will it blend properly? As long the the atomization via the HVLP doesn't actually create a different color.

No problem. Doesn't matter if you are shooting with an HVLP gun, older style siphon gun, air brush...the only difference is how the gun propels the paint. If you are using the same paint, you shouldn't see a difference in color. The air brush won't lay out the paint as heavy as the HVLP (High Volume Low Pressure). The siphon gun can lay on heavy coats, but with lots of air and overspray. So if your paint is somewhat transparent, then you may need to apply more coats with an airbrush to create the same amount of opaqueness. If you are doing a large area and want to be assured the blend won't show, then you should over spray each new coat onto the previous coat (overlap) a little more with each new coat...Hope that makes sense. Another way to avoid seeing a blend is to mask your lines at natural breaks.

#131 62 days ago

We're actually pretty happy right now.

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There's something about planning stuff out, executing, and getting it right that just makes father's day 100% perfect. The lighting doesn't do it justice. We hit the red with 800, so it's been deglossed, and the purple was still curing in the photos...and the lighting was weird. But we're happy.

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Next stage is mixing touch up paint, fixing any little mistakes, and then move to do some coats of regular clear, sand, and final matte clear.

#132 59 days ago

Unaltered coat of MC760 clear to lock down the colors. This is not the final surface as we will finish with a matte clear. Our intent is to sand this flatter, see how it looks, and decide if it needs another coat of clear and sanding prior to final topcoat.

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#133 59 days ago

I should add that we don't really think this needs to be perfectly flat. Stencils have layers. Original machines had those layers as well. Even as a resto-mod, we would be fine with some edges/layers. However, if you ever choose to use automotive paints, I recommend two stage, basecoat paints. The colors we wanted were unavailable outside of the single stage paint we had access to, and unfortunately those have clear built into them and tend to go on a bit thicker. You can convert them to two stage, but they remain pretty thick.

Compare this to a rattle can, where really it's simple and what you see is what you get. This automotive finish is amazing looking, like a car, and we really love how it looks...but it has its drawbacks. The challenge next is block sanding it without cutting into the color in a damaging way.

#134 57 days ago
Quoted from jsa:

Unaltered coat of MC760 clear to lock down the colors. This is not the final surface as we will finish with a matte clear. Our intent is to sand this flatter, see how it looks, and decide if it needs another coat of clear and sanding prior to final topcoat.

That is really looking sharp.

#135 56 days ago

Taking some time trying to match the dark red paint of the apron to fix up some damage.

We're using Createx airbrush paints for this.

This is where experience counts...and we have none. I've managed to make a nice purply brown.

Anyone have any advice for this? We've followed vid1900's method but for crying out loud, it's super frustrating!

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We start with red, add a little yellow...seems to be going in the right direction, but too bright. If we add blue or black, things go off the rails really fast.

#136 56 days ago

I'm not sure if this helps you, but when I need to match a color, I let the pros at the auto paint store do it. They can mix as little as 30ml in a little bottle. You could take your apron there and they use a computer/scanner to identify the colors for the mix, then they can tint to perfection if needed. Of course, the cheaper way would probably be to paint the apron a gloss red base coat and buy the decal.

#137 56 days ago

Check out the repro Metal apron thread. A couple have requested Future Spa. I bought the Fathom and SBM and they’re vey well done.

#138 55 days ago
Quoted from Joey_N:

Check out the repro Metal apron thread. A couple have requested Future Spa. I bought the Fathom and SBM and they’re vey well done.

The guy on the metal apron thread hasn't done Future Spa yet. But the decal is available at Ministry of Pinball:

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#139 55 days ago
Quoted from JethroP:

The guy on the metal apron thread hasn't done Future Spa yet. But the decal is available at Ministry of Pinball:

Yeah, I appreciate the alternatives... We're committed to restoring this one. It's literally almost perfect, having come from a NOS assembly. It's just a matter of matching a small amount of paint. There are literally no ball trails, it seems to have been scuffed either in transit or during its brief life in a HUO condition.

We're going to try both our match (by eye) and professional match (computer + professional eyes) and see who comes in closest. The challenge with the pro match is that it's latex, but that's fine, we'll thin and airbrush it.

#140 55 days ago
Quoted from JethroP:

The guy on the metal apron thread hasn't done Future Spa yet. But the decal is available at Ministry of Pinball:

Oh I know, sorry, I meant just get on the list. Sounds like the OP doesn’t really need it though. I haven’t actually confirmed that the original fades like the cabinet does.

#141 55 days ago
Quoted from Joey_N:

Oh I know, sorry, I meant just get on the list. Sounds like the OP doesn’t really need it though. I haven’t actually confirmed that the original fades like the cabinet does.

Funny, I just got a call from the professional paint matcher. He says that the color is an usual red, and very difficult to match. It's not just me! He's going to try some oil-based alternatives just to see, but you can imagine that I'm not thrilled.

We may have no choice but to sand it all down and restore everything with waterslide decals on top of a new red. Disappointing. vid1900 any sage advice here?

#142 54 days ago

Ok, first round of clear has been sanded as flat as it would go until it started to cut into the color (as expected). Minor touch ups completed, and another round of clear shot. It went on pretty smooth this time. After it cures a few days we'll sand again and hit it with the final, matte clear.

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#143 53 days ago

Nothing like a real professional willing to do a little extra homework. We have our apron red!

The short version is that with water-based paints, it's extremely difficult (if not impossible) to get this Bally red without crossing over into muddy or brown. It has to do with the red pigment and modern chemical regulations making it difficult to pull off.

I got a very experienced professional to figure this out, and he started with a very expensive (like $50 expensive) quart of European Hollandlac oil-based enamel. He spent the better part of two days adjusting, and was able to hit a color match by adding a violet purple and another purple to the mix on a satin sheen version of the paint. After performing the naptha test it's pretty much dead on.

Unfortunately, since this is oil based and everything else we're doing is not, we have to be very careful using it and ensure it cures fully and then scuffed properly before clearing over it (which is absolutely required since it has a different sheen than the rest of the paint we're using).

For future reference, this Bally red was achieved with Hollandlac Satin 1002 Rembrandt Red, with ALK24-1Y and ALK241-4 added, by eye.

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#144 50 days ago

The slightest scratch with an Xacto knife on the apron creates a trail of lifted paint. Note to self: Just say no to cutting Frisket until I have more practice.

1 week later
#145 37 days ago

Added new coin door guides. One of the originals was completely missing, the other was a science experiment of 40 year old beer goo. The new ones are bit sharper than the originals but we like them this way:

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Then, re-taped for matte clear application. Next, we sanded with 600 for final application of clear coat (matte/eggshell level finish):

IMG_1635.JPG

Next step is clear coating the apron and shooting that final matte clear. The temperature is around 76 degrees out so we're waiting for the temperature to drop to around 68 or so before shooting.

#146 37 days ago

Apron cleared. Not perfect, but a real improvement.

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#147 37 days ago

Wet sand the apron with 1000, 1200, or 1500 then polish it. It will smooth out the orange peel and be perfect.

#148 37 days ago
Quoted from JethroP:

Wet sand the apron with 1000, 1200, or 1500 then polish it. It will smooth out the orange peel and be perfect.

Yep, that's the plan. It's only on the edges the player can't see anyway. We got some orange peel above the repair in the upper left, I think mostly because it's on top of oil paint (which wasn't supposed to work at all).

I can't stress enough the importance of temperature on clear coating for us. In the end, we found that 68 degrees was the ideal temperature and the clear would "flow out" into a perfectly flat surface.

The challenge, though, is runs. Clearing the final coat on the cabinet went perfect, but the back box had runs on one side, so we'll need to sand that out and recoat. Almost there.

#149 36 days ago
Quoted from jsa:

Yep, that's the plan. It's only on the edges the player can't see anyway. We got some orange peel above the repair in the upper left, I think mostly because it's on top of oil paint (which wasn't supposed to work at all).
I can't stress enough the importance of temperature on clear coating for us. In the end, we found that 68 degrees was the ideal temperature and the clear would "flow out" into a perfectly flat surface.
The challenge, though, is runs. Clearing the final coat on the cabinet went perfect, but the back box had runs on one side, so we'll need to sand that out and recoat. Almost there.

You're doing a beautiful job! Maybe you know already, but if not, and for those that are following that might clearcoat one day, the activators that you mix with the clear are specified for a temperature range. You can buy slow, medium, or fast (cold temp, warmer temp, and warmest temp) depending upon the ambient temperature you plan to spray. Yeah, you want that "flow out into a perfectly flat surface" without flowing too much (runs). That's the art and skill that come with practice. If at all possible, spray on a horizontal surface, rather than a vertical one (which you already found out) to avoid runs. Cool thing about two part clears (and colors of for that matter), blemishes can be sanded out pretty easily and redone. I'm enjoying following your progress. I have a Future Spa in very good condition....but nothing that comes close to the beauty and perfection of yours!

#150 36 days ago
Quoted from JethroP:

You're doing a beautiful job! Maybe you know already, but if not, and for those that are following that might clearcoat one day, the activators that you mix with the clear are specified for a temperature range. You can buy slow, medium, or fast (cold temp, warmer temp, and warmest temp) depending upon the ambient temperature you plan to spray. Yeah, you want that "flow out into a perfectly flat surface" without flowing too much (runs). That's the art and skill that come with practice. If at all possible, spray on a horizontal surface, rather than a vertical one (which you already found out) to avoid runs. Cool thing about two part clears (and colors of for that matter), blemishes can be sanded out pretty easily and redone. I'm enjoying following your progress. I have a Future Spa in very good condition....but nothing that comes close to the beauty and perfection of yours!

Thanks! As we repair these runs, we'll put the backbox horizontal. Unfortunately, given the way/timing and pot life of the clear (about 2 hours before it's unusable), we couldn't figure out a way to do one side at a time without wasting a ton of clear...maybe we should have just done it one side at a time. Too late now. I have been watching others do it vertically, and you're right, the artisan experience counts here. Watching @high_end_pins do this without any fear is amazing. That's what an accomplished automotive painter brings to the table with this!

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