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(Topic ID: 172513)

Furnace replacement


By s1500

4 years ago



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  • 70 posts
  • 43 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by Jgaltr56
  • Topic is favorited by 4 Pinsiders

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    #1 4 years ago

    So I had to get my furnace fixed last night, and to add a wonderful addition to the repair, it got the dreaded red tag. I could only use the furance as a renegade, due to unfavoable CO levels from the stack.

    So I'm getting 2 estimates today. I asked the repair guy what the average cost for replacement was, and he said between 5 and 25 large. That seems rather high, looking on google searches, the national average is around 3500.

    What's everyone's experiences with a furnace replacement? I moved in the house in '02, and don't know how old my furance is, but I'm assuming it's over 20 years old. Had to have the ignitor thing replaced again.

    Have this feeling this replacement's still going to cost me less than a BM66LE. Heh

    #2 4 years ago

    What type of fuel is it using?

    #3 4 years ago

    If it's gas, about $3k if the swap is basic. If sheet metal fittings need to be made, maybe $1k more depending on how much there is and what else you have.

    #4 4 years ago

    Check out https://www.alpinehomeair.com/. I ordered a furnace there last year for under a grand (including a new transition kit) and installed it myself. Took about 3 hours labor. That was for a standard natural-gas furnace. Plenty of videos online for free with instructions on how to replace a furnace. You could also find a local handyman to do the install after you purchase - should not cost more than an extra grand. It's really not a difficult job though if you want to tackle it yourself. $5k-$25 seems VERY high to me. In comparison, I had a fuel-oil furnace in my house in 2011. I had a company come in and replace it with a geothermal furnace (5-ton) and closed ground loop (over a mile of pipe in the ground if I recall correctly). Total cost was about $28k, including electrical, which involved upgrading the home's feed to a buried 300-amp line. Best part is that you get a 30% tax credit (not deduction) for geothermal costs (including landscaping), and it carries over into subsequent years if you didn't pay that much in taxes that year.

    #5 4 years ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    What type of fuel is it using?

    I'm on natural gas. I did overhear one horror story many moons ago where a house had still an outlet for a now-gone heating oil furnace. The heating oil guy filled it up anyway.

    #6 4 years ago
    Quoted from s1500:

    I'm on natural gas.

    Yep, way overpriced then. If it's not a job you want to do yourself, get a few other quotes.

    I'm not sure if angie's list is still a thing or not, but if you can't get a word-of-mouth recommendation for a company, that might be something to try.

    #7 4 years ago
    Quoted from s1500:

    due to unfavoable CO levels from the stack.

    This is because he didn't clean the burners and adjust the gas pressure. This repairman is a scammer. The only way this should cost 25k is if it has a 22k rebate. My area prices run about 2500-4500.

    #8 4 years ago

    $5K MAXIMUM. And that is with new plenums. Make sure to get several quotes. Some guys think if they red tag you, it's a license to rob you blind.

    #9 4 years ago

    I got an oil burner replaced a few years ago and it was like 3K

    #10 4 years ago

    $800 for the brand new furnace and another $800 installed. 95% efficient. Less then two years ago. And No I cant get another one, but lets just say its all who you know.

    John P. Dayhuff
    Battle Creek, MI.
    269-979-3836

    #11 4 years ago
    Quoted from s1500:

    So I had to get my furnace fixed last night, and to add a wonderful addition to the repair, it got the dreaded red tag. I could only use the furance as a renegade, due to unfavoable CO levels from the stack.
    So I'm getting 2 estimates today. I asked the repair guy what the average cost for replacement was, and he said between 5 and 25 large. That seems rather high, looking on google searches, the national average is around 3500.
    What's everyone's experiences with a furnace replacement? I moved in the house in '02, and don't know how old my furance is, but I'm assuming it's over 20 years old. Had to have the ignitor thing replaced again.
    Have this feeling this replacement's still going to cost me less than a BM66LE. Heh

    I paid $2K installed for a gas furnace last year. Natural gas, 96% efficiency 80K btu, and it was a fairly basic swap with some minor sheet metal re-work to make it fit. The installer was a local guy that has his own business and is very fair with pricing.

    #12 4 years ago
    Quoted from sulakd:

    Check out https://www.alpinehomeair.com/. I ordered a furnace there last year for under a grand (including a new transition kit) and installed it myself. Took about 3 hours labor. That was for a standard natural-gas furnace. Plenty of videos online for free with instructions on how to replace a furnace. You could also find a local handyman to do the install after you purchase - should not cost more than an extra grand. It's really not a difficult job though if you want to tackle it yourself. $5k-$25 seems VERY high to me. In comparison, I had a fuel-oil furnace in my house in 2011. I had a company come in and replace it with a geothermal furnace (5-ton) and closed ground loop (over a mile of pipe in the ground if I recall correctly). Total cost was about $28k, including electrical, which involved upgrading the home's feed to a buried 300-amp line. Best part is that you get a 30% tax credit (not deduction) for geothermal costs (including landscaping), and it carries over into subsequent years if you didn't pay that much in taxes that year.

    I did the same thing! Used there home size calculator to determine BTU furnace size, ordered on-line and like 3 days later it arrived on a small pallet. Took me about 4 hrs because I extended the gas line and installed a new plenum but it was really easy. Saved $1000s!! There are many you tube videos for reference!

    522563_3749262487351_1578965442_n (resized).jpg

    #13 4 years ago

    Don't go with some generic cheap furnace, you will pay for it years down the road. Also do not use Angie's list or any other referral websites-they are a joke. First thing to do is find your current BTU on your current unit and evaluate if it is sufficient for your square feet that you are trying to heat. Measure the unit and evaluate the space available for the new unit. Then I recommend only two vendors-Trane and Carrier. Nothing runs like a Trane is their moto and trust me it is true. I would start by calling the Trane wholesale distributor in your area and ask the salesman who is a really good HVAC guy(one of their regular customers) that would do good work for a decent price. Get three phone numbers and call them all. Tell them your current model, BTU's and Sq. Ft. of home to determine proper unit. Choose the vendor that is competitive with price but also may be able to deal in dead presidents. I purchase my own units wholesale and then pay cash for installation-saving thousands of dollars.

    By the way if your unit got tagged there is a reason and it is not safe for your family. Often times there can be hairline cracks in the heat exchanger that can cause carbon monoxide leaks and can potentially become a huge health concern. Just FYI

    #14 4 years ago
    Quoted from pinmister:

    Don't go with some generic cheap furnace, you will pay for it years down the road. Also do not use Angie's list or any other referral websites-they are a joke. First thing to do is find your current BTU on your current unit and evaluate if it is sufficient for your square feet that you are trying to heat. Measure the unit and evaluate the space available for the new unit. Then I recommend only two vendors-Trane and Carrier. Nothing runs like a Trane is their moto and trust me it is true. I would start by calling the Trane wholesale distributor in your area and ask the salesman who is a really good HVAC guy(one of their regular customers) that would do good work for a decent price. Get three phone numbers and call them all. Choose the vendor that is competitive with price but also may be able to deal in dead presidents. I purchase my own units wholesale and then pay cash for installation-saving thousands of dollars.
    By the way if your unit got tagged there is a reason and it is not safe for your family. Often times there can be hairline cracks in the heat exchanger that can cause carbon monoxide leaks and can potentially become a huge health concern. Just FYI

    This, 100%

    #15 4 years ago

    I switched from oil to propane last year. Furnace was 30 years old and ready for replacement. Cost me around $3800 total to remove original equipment and replace with new Luxaire unit. This was done by a properly licensed company (with great local reviews) and included a warranty. Saved a ton of $ over the winter from the previous year.

    #16 4 years ago

    There maybe unlicensed home owners that install there own furnaces but in if the furnace breaks down it may not be covered under warranty. The life of the furnace can be affected by the quality of installation and proper start-up checks . A good quality furnace manufacturer will require air flow measurements , combustion analysis,checking/adjusting temperature rise and measuring gas flow to assure the unit is firing at the correct BTU rating

    #17 4 years ago
    Quoted from pinmister:

    Don't go with some generic cheap furnace, you will pay for it years down the road. Also do not use Angie's list or any other referral websites-they are a joke. First thing to do is find your current BTU on your current unit and evaluate if it is sufficient for your square feet that you are trying to heat. Measure the unit and evaluate the space available for the new unit. Then I recommend only two vendors-Trane and Carrier. Nothing runs like a Trane is their moto and trust me it is true. I would start by calling the Trane wholesale distributor in your area and ask the salesman who is a really good HVAC guy(one of their regular customers) that would do good work for a decent price. Get three phone numbers and call them all. Tell them your current model, BTU's and Sq. Ft. of home to determine proper unit. Choose the vendor that is competitive with price but also may be able to deal in dead presidents. I purchase my own units wholesale and then pay cash for installation-saving thousands of dollars.
    By the way if your unit got tagged there is a reason and it is not safe for your family. Often times there can be hairline cracks in the heat exchanger that can cause carbon monoxide leaks and can potentially become a huge health concern. Just FYI

    Good recommendation. Dad has sold Trane and American Standard (same company) for years. They do make a cheaper Mexican made brand called Ameristar.

    I would also suggest getting a quote on the outdoor unit as well. Look at heat pumps if you don't have one already. What area are you from?

    #18 4 years ago

    Got a high efficiency oil Furnace( over 90 percect efficient) installed last year for around 2k and it has a lifetime warranty on the heat exchanger and 20 years on other important parts .

    #19 4 years ago

    Trane and Carrier the two most overpriced made in Mexico brands you could buy. Everything is great until that warranty runs out and you have to pay for parts. Trane is so great Ingersoll Rand can't find a buyer for it. They have been trying to sell it for over 5 years. Carrier has huge heat exchanger and A/C indoor coil failures. I won't recommend a brand but would say stay away from these two. They do have good advertising departments though.

    #20 4 years ago
    Quoted from kuelman:

    Trane and Carrier the two most overpriced made in Mexico brands you could buy. Everything is great until that warranty runs out and you have to pay for parts. Trane is so great Ingersoll Rand can't find a buyer for it. They have been trying to sell it for over 5 years. Carrier has huge heat exchanger and A/C indoor coil failures. I won't recommend a brand but would say stay away from these two. They do have good advertising departments though.

    Most Trane equipment is made in the U.S as well as American Standard.

    I'll agree on Carrier. Dad has been working HVAC since the early 80s and in the 90s, he worked for the Carrier dealer in Bloomington, IN. He was not impressed by the equipment.

    #21 4 years ago

    Often the scammer furnace guy will say that the heat exchanger is cracked, and he "had to turn off the gas supply, otherwise HE would be libel when the CO2 kills everyone in their sleep".

    By leaving you with no heat, he gets you to quickly buy a new furnace.

    But remember, most heat exchangers come with a 30 year (or sometimes lifetime) warranty from the manufacturer. A quick phone call will verify this. The warranty includes installation.

    #22 4 years ago

    I would get another price plus opinion from a different company on weather your furnace is bad, have seen how companies scam people into buying new equipment, plus the price sounds really high.

    #23 4 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Often the scammer furnace guy will say that the heat exchanger is cracked, and he "had to turn off the gas supply, otherwise HE would be libel when the CO2 kills everyone in their sleep".
    By leaving you with no heat, he gets you to quickly buy a new furnace.
    But remember, most heat exchangers come with a 30 year (or sometimes lifetime) warranty from the manufacturer. A quick phone call will verify this. The warranty includes installation.

    As usual, vid1900 has very good advice. That being said, we had a lousy warranty on a furnace that had a cracked heat exchanger in a house that we were in the process of selling. The upshot was $2,500 from a reputable HVAC guy got us a new furnace installed basically the next day in time for re-nspection at the walk through.

    #24 4 years ago

    Also keep in mind if the guy is recommending a high efficiency 90%+ furnace (which are more $$ off the bat) then you will most likely have to replace the exhaust ducting. HE furnaces use a second heat exchanger to extract heat from the exhaust gases, the downside is you get acid rain condensing in the exhaust duct therefore requiring new PVC ducting. It all drives up the install price. It will be less expensive short term to stick with a 85% efficient furnace and reuse your existing ducting. Bryant makes some nice ones that are reasonable and still more efficient than your old one. Obviously the payback on a high efficiency furnace all depends on how much you use it and the cost of fuel. In my experience there are much better ways to save money on heating like better insulation, sealing up or replacing drafty windows and doors, etc.

    #25 4 years ago

    Well maybe in CO they give natural gas away but in my area you would be a fool to have a 80% furnace installed.
    Spend the extra upfront for a 96% furnace unless you like paying more for heat over and over and over every winter.
    Would you buy a new vehicle that gets 8 miles to a gallon? Of course not at least the average person would not.
    The average payback between the two is around 2-3 years could be less depending on your old furnace.

    #26 4 years ago

    Do your homework. I have a natural gas boiler circa 1974, when I was in Afghanistan we had a carbon monoxide problem in Our basement, and the boiler wouldn't stay lit. Wife called repairman out, he looked at our boiler and said it was to old and he couldn't work on it, it was to bad of shape to fix, couldn't get parts etc. but happily quoted us a new one at $25k. He also scared my wife to death over it and just about had her talked into buying a new one. We called another company and they came out and cleaned everything, took it apart and cleaned it. He then relit the pilot and took a bunch of readings and everything was fine. The problem was the exhaust gases could escape as they were supposed to, after cleaning everything worked fine. In the end, the second company was surprised at how good of condition our boiler was in and said we shouldn't need a boiler for many many years.

    I tell you this because in today's society it's easier to remove and replace components and systems instead of good old fashion trouble shooting. It also generates more money scaring people into new equipment that's not built as well as the older stuff and generates more service calls for the new stuff later down the road. They try to sell you on efficiency ratings and safety features that replaced common sense. That "more efficient" piece of equipment at $XX,xxx could take decades to pay for itself in the immediate small money savings from being more efficient. Think about it, even if it saves you $300 a year, but cost $10,000 it would take over 30 years to break even, then you are back at square one again, old equipment and service techs telling you that a new system is needed.

    #27 4 years ago

    25k for a new boiler is another rip off. But your circa 1974 boiler is costing you a lot of extra money to run that you will never get back. I replaced my standing pilot furnace there was nothing wrong with it. But boy o boy did my power and gas bill drop after I replaced it. My only regret was I didn't do it earlier.

    #28 4 years ago

    My old heater is still working like a charm.

    16a5a5de2bea65a5eaac5fa482a0ee9a (resized).jpg

    #29 4 years ago

    Most brands will work properly if installed correctly and are properly sized. I see too many improper installations and sizing issues than I care to mention. I'm an hvac tech that also has a contractors licence. As far as brands Trane and Carrier are both good brands. The heat exchanger and evaporator coil issues mentioned on Carrier products are old products not made anymore. Lennox is an ok brand too, but getting parts as a non Lennox dealer is tough. Those brands do a better job of self policing and weeding out the clem&cleetus outfits. Variable speed furnaces are nice but if the warranty is expired some parts can get pricey quick. My .02.

    #30 4 years ago

    Get multiple opinions and prices. I see too many idiots doing this that should be nowhere near gas and electricity that think the only way is to rip off people.

    #31 4 years ago
    Quoted from kuelman:

    1974 boiler is costing you a lot of extra money to run that you will never get back.

    Probably more than a new unit, but it only runs a few months out of the year (4-5 months) so how long would it take to break even, then I could worry about cost savings. I also have only had to turn on the boiler once so far this season and it already November.

    #32 4 years ago

    totally get another quote and inspection.

    no way it could be anywhere near 25k for gas

    I fixed mine last year. It was only a sensor that needed cleaning but I don't want to know what they would of charged or replaced if I called someone.

    The internet is a great resource even if most don't use it as one

    #33 4 years ago

    I just replaced my furnace about 3 years ago. Went with a two-stage, 98% efficiency, natural gas, whole-house humidifier, electrostatic air cleaner, and UV air purifier, and the entire job was around $5k. That was for a furnace sized for a 4600 sq foot home, including a SEER 22 A/C compressor too.

    I have a wood burning insert in my fireplace -- keeps the house at 74 degrees all winter and my natural gas bill winds up being about $35 a month, largely for the gas cooktop and the hot water heater.

    #34 4 years ago

    I replaced my boiler from 1981 just last year. It's been fine for years since I keep up with the service, but early in the heating season last year it started to fail. I thought I could eeek it out until this Spring but it decided to go south at the end of January. Thank God it was a relatively mild Winter. I had a new oil-fired unit installed for just about 5k. It is incredible! less than 1/2 the size of the old one and is whisper quiet and ultra reliable. My oil consumption is about 1/2 of what it was, too. If you plan on living in your home for some time, do it, it's one of the best things you can do!

    #35 4 years ago

    If you are replacing an older natural gas forced air furnace, now is the time to look at upgrading the replacement since technology has changed since the failed unit was first installed. Depending where you live (climate) should have an influence on what equipment you select. For northern states you should consider a humidifier installed on the furnace outlet. Another consideration is an electronic air filter. If you go with a high efficiency furnace (recommended in colder states) then you will have to run PVC piping that takes cold air from outside for combustion and vents warm exhaust gases through a second pipe. No one here can tell you what a system should cost since they don't know your parameters. I chose the most efficient Lennox Signature series equipment they offered since I felt it would be the most reliable with the shortest pay-back period. Ten plus years and I haven't spent a dime on service calls.

    #36 4 years ago

    -Yes. You are getting ripped off (get other bids).
    -Going high efficient (90% or over) will cost more up front and you'll save 10-17% on you home heating cost (not your total gas bill)
    -Heat exchanger PART warranties are about 25 to 30 years on 80% furnaces (some 90% furnaces give a lifetime part). Labor rarely is covered (unless it fails within the contractors labor warrantly).
    -A Humidifier is money well spent, an electronic air cleaner (and uv lights) are iffy at best.
    -DO get a furnace with an ECM blower motor (x-13 or variable speed) it will benefit you summer and winter.
    -Most, brands are fine as long as they aren't oversized and installed correctly (getting warranty parts for certain brands is another matter).
    -If the AC and evaporator coil are old or the same age, it would be wise to replace them as well. The last thing you want is to have a coil ice up and leak all over your new furnace. R22 is getting very expensive and its manufacture will cease in 2020. Also an AHRI certified matched system that achieves 16 seer (furnace, AC, and coil) qualifies for a tax credit (and possibly a utility rebate if they have them in your area)
    -Above all, have a good/reputable contractor do the work. If you have problems they are the ones you will be calling if have a problem

    #37 4 years ago

    The best tip I have seen in this post so far was to call the local wholesalers of heating equipment.
    They know what companies do good work at reasonable prices. If you want a cheap contractor that is
    the kind of installation you will get. Watch out for the ones that are twice as much as others. They may
    do good work but then again I have seen many of them companies that do shoddy work as well. Proper installation
    is the key no matter what brand you go with. Wholesalers know who the hacks and parts changers are even if they
    can't tell you who they are. In regards to the online sizing programs and charts don't trust them. There is no magic
    square foot to how big of a unit you need. Most existing equipment in many homes is not properly sized. Most are oversized this makes for a uncomfortable home and is hard on the equipment. If your lucky you will find a contractor that knows how to do a proper ACCA approved manual J load calculation.

    #38 4 years ago
    Quoted from KeithinMI:

    4600 sq foot home.
    I have a wood burning insert in my fireplace -- keeps the house at 74 degrees all winter and my natural gas bill winds up being about $35 a month, largely for the gas cooktop and the hot water heater.

    Wow, must be a giant insert!

    #39 4 years ago

    Who's wanting to trade a pin for a new trane furnace and or A/C installed

    image (resized).jpg

    #40 4 years ago
    Quoted from dmbjunky:

    Most Trane equipment is made in the U.S as well as American Standard.
    I'll agree on Carrier. Dad has been working HVAC since the early 80s and in the 90s, he worked for the Carrier dealer in Bloomington, IN. He was not impressed by the equipment.

    What company is he with? The father inlaw lives in Oden, I pass a few small shops on the way down.

    #41 4 years ago
    Quoted from Heatman:

    Who's wanting to trade a pin for a new trane furnace and or A/C installed

    I think I get your username now.
    2 of my pins are in another pinsider's hands in exchange for home improvement work.

    #42 4 years ago

    I suggest your try another repair person I had one company red tag everything and it was a scam to sell new units learned when they tried to do it a second time.

    #43 4 years ago
    Quoted from Heatman:

    Who's wanting to trade a pin for a new trane furnace and or A/C installed

    I have an old Rheem that's been quite reliable but was amused to see this:

    "Nothing stops a Trane"

    #44 4 years ago
    Quoted from Heatman:

    What company is he with? The father inlaw lives in Oden, I pass a few small shops on the way down.

    Dad works at Crane doing HVAC for them now. He's done side work since before 2000. Dad, Grandpa, and an Uncle used to have a company in Bedford called Deckard Heating and Air Conditioning. Dad quit in the early 90s and the business shut down in the late 90s. When Dad started doing side business my brother and I helped him when we were in junior high.

    Quoted from o-din:

    My old heater is still working like a charm.

    I've got a Pioneer Maid cook stove that I use to cook, heat, and make warm water. Even though I have an old furnace I need to replace I don't need to use it because of the wood stove.

    #45 4 years ago

    I would definitely recommend not doing your own furnace and going the referral route. UV lights are worth looking into especially if people in the house and breathing issues. Most likely your new furnace will be smaller than you're old one so ductwork will be needed as well.

    #46 4 years ago

    Depending on where you live, you may not be able to sell your house with a furnace installed without a permit or by an unlicensed installer.

    Unless you heed Thornton Melon's advice from Back to School.......

    #47 4 years ago
    Quoted from MrBally:

    Unless you heed Thornton Melon's advice from Back to School.......

    A few bucks for the building inspectors never hurt anyone.

    LTG : )

    #48 4 years ago

    I'll admit, I did some roof work on my garage with a few people to save quite a bit of $. Even rebuilt a car transmission one winter. But there's no way I'm going to trust myself with installing a furnace. I just don't want to risk blowing up the house.

    #49 4 years ago

    Just bought a 80% for a 1000 Sq foot space this week for $1700 installed. Had the option for a 95+ for $2200. I use this guy and get a great price for it However the other quote I got was only $500 more either way. Still way short of $5k.

    I put a brand new 95+ and AC in my 2500sq ft house. It was $5500.

    #50 4 years ago
    Quoted from Three60in:

    Just bought a 80% for a 1000 Sq foot space this week for $1700 installed. Had the option for a 95+ for $2200. I use this guy and get a great price for it However the other quote I got was only $500 more either way. Still way short of $5k.
    I put a brand new 95+ and AC in my 2500sq ft house. It was $5500.

    Yep, About 1700 to 2000 is about what I charge for an 80%er installed. I've been in the HVAC business all my life and still am.
    To bad your not in the Oklahoma City area.

    ...then again, I don't know what area you are in

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