From zero to a flipping game in 1h45m with the Mission Framework


By BrianMadden

3 years ago


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23
#1 3 years ago

Hi Everyone,

I'm Brian Madden, one of the creators (along with Gabe Knuth) of the Mission Pinball Framework (MPF), a Python-based open source pinball framework that can be used to create software for pinball machines with P-ROC or FAST pinball controllers in them.

In the JPOP thread last week, I was talking about how if JPOP wanted to use MPF to be the software for his machines, I believe that someone could get the code for his machine completely done in a month or two. I also said I'd take the challenge to see how far I can get with MPF with a brand new machine in one day. (i.e. I walk up to a machine I've never written any code for, and using MPF, how far can I get in a day?)

So anyway, today is that day. I have a Demolition Man that I just got, and at 7:30 this morning, I removed the Williams MPU and replaced it with a P-ROC. After that it only took me 1 hour 45 minutes to get a completely playable game up and running. (About 45min was spent just going through the manual and adding all the switches, coils, lamps, and flashers into my config, 45min to group all those together into the "logical" devices like troughs, VUKs, jets, flippers, targets, etc. Maybe 15min to fix typos and adjust pulse times and another min or two to throw together a real quick DMD attract show and game display.)

Of course there is no scoring or music or light shows, but you can play complete games.. multiple players, etc. And of course it was under 2 hours! I'm just trying to show how easy it is to get started.

Unfortunately I need to step away for a few hours, but when I get back I'll create some shots, scoring, maybe some modes, some light shows, music, etc. (And again, this is all just in one day.)

Anyway, here's a Youtube video of the (boring yet playable) game after 2 hours:
» YouTube video

Here's a link to the entire "config" I created which powers the code in this video:
https://gist.github.com/missionpinball/5d34dcd21ce1aa906ab4

Here's the step-by-step tutorial which you can use to do the same thing on your game:
https://missionpinball.com/docs/tutorial/

I'll post more later today to show the progress. I'll also write a full blog post tomorrow with all the details, including links to all the configs, the show files, etc.

#2 3 years ago

Very cool. Looking forward to seeing what you do with the DM Layout.

Marcus

#3 3 years ago

Wow! Great job. Wish I could do something like that. Good luck the rest of the way.

#4 3 years ago

Watching.

(insert Stern code joke here)

#6 3 years ago

I really want to dive into this when I get some Some time.

#7 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

Hi Everyone,
I'm Brian Madden, one of the creators (along with Gabe Knuth) of the Mission Pinball Framework (MPF), a Python-based open source pinball framework that can be used to create software for pinball machines with P-ROC or FAST pinball controllers in them.
In the JPOP thread last week, I was talking about how if JPOP wanted to use MPF to be the software for his machines, I believe that someone could get the code for his machine completely done in a month or two. I also said I'd take the challenge to see how far I can get with MPF with a brand new machine in one day. (i.e. I walk up to a machine I've never written any code for, and using MPF, how far can I get in a day?)
So anyway, today is that day. I have a Demolition Man that I just got, and at 7:30 this morning, I removed the Williams MPU and replaced it with a P-ROC. After that it only took me 1 hour 45 minutes to get a completely playable game up and running. (About 45min was spent just going through the manual and adding all the switches, coils, lamps, and flashers into my config, 45min to group all those together into the "logical" devices like troughs, VUKs, jets, flippers, targets, etc. Maybe 15min to fix typos and adjust pulse times and another min or two to throw together a real quick DMD attract show and game display.)
Of course there is no scoring or music or light shows, but you can play complete games.. multiple players, etc. And of course it was under 2 hours! I'm just trying to show how easy it is to get started.
Unfortunately I need to step away for a few hours, but when I get back I'll create some shots, scoring, maybe some modes, some light shows, music, etc. (And again, this is all just in one day.)
Anyway, here's a Youtube video of the (boring yet playable) game after 2 hours:
» YouTube video
Here's a link to the entire "config" I created which powers the code in this video:
https://gist.github.com/missionpinball/5d34dcd21ce1aa906ab4
Here's the step-by-step tutorial which you can use to do the same thing on your game:
https://missionpinball.com/docs/tutorial/
I'll post more later today to show the progress. I'll also write a full blog post tomorrow with all the details, including links to all the configs, the show files, etc.

Phenomenal.
I have seen your website and read a little of the documentation. Exciting stuff for sure and an impressive proof of concept. MPF really facilitates rapid iteration.

10
#8 3 years ago

Ok, back from my meeting. Next I decided to tackle the Attract Mode light show. I recorded a video of the original one before I pulled out the MPU and I recreated it in MPF. Took 58 minutes. Here's a video showing the two:

» YouTube video

To be clear, I'm not trying to copy the "real" Demolition Man, and I will not be copying any more features from the game. Rather, I'm looking at this as if a designer came to me and said "write the code for my game. Here's my light show idea."

Latest game code here. 2 hours, 45 min of work so far:
https://github.com/missionpinball/mpf_demo_man

Next up I'll add shots and scoring.

#9 3 years ago

Do you have any idea how long it would take to getting to play the full Demolition Man ruleset?

#10 3 years ago

My claim is that if the art, dots, sounds, rules, etc. were already worked out and all I was doing was "programming" the game, I really don't think it would take more than a few weeks. I've gone on record before saying I think just about any game could be done in a month. (That's what a lot of people haven't believed, which is why I was like, "ok, fine, well let me take this game and show you how far I can get in a day, and then you can extrapolate from there.")

Again the big assumption is this isn't counting the design of the rules and the dots and all that.

It's interesting to think about in the context of that whole "WPC 2.0" thing. Obviously there's a lot more involved there in terms of licensing and all that, but from a programming standpoint, someone who knew MPF could crank out the top 20 classic B/W games in a year and then all the "code" would be open, easily tweak-able, extendable, etc. That's a topic for another thread of course, but my point is that in terms of actually programming these games via MPF, it's pretty straightforward.

#11 3 years ago

Very cool

#12 3 years ago

Next I added shots and scoring. The "Shots" module in MPF is where you configure series of switches that have to be hit in a certain order in a certain timeframe to count as a shot. (So, ramp enter plus ramp exit, in that order, within 3 seconds, means the ramp was made.)

Figuring out all the shots was done by throwing the ball around with the glass off and looking at the MPF log file to see what switches changed state in what order.

Once I had those set, I created a bunch of scoring events which is basically assigning points to different things.

Total time in this step: 30 min. Total time so far on this project: 3 hours, 15 min.

Video of the current progress is here:

» YouTube video

Current game code is here:
https://github.com/missionpinball/mpf_demo_man

#13 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

Next I added shots and scoring. The "Shots" module in MPF is where you configure series of switches that have to be hit in a certain order in a certain timeframe to count as a shot. (So, ramp enter plus ramp exit, in that order, within 3 seconds, means the ramp was made

I would actually skip the entrance requirement and just score on the made switch, unless there's something odd like the ramp having two entrances. Otherwise, you miss scoring slow entrance-rattlers that make it but not in the allotted time, or shots that sneak under the entrance. Sequence is necessary for scoring orbits though.

#14 3 years ago
Quoted from metallik:

I would actually skip the entrance requirement and just score on the made switch

Oh yeah good call. Use the entrance switch to maybe kick off sfx and light shows and stuff, but yeah, no reason to track that for the purposes of scoring or tracking shots made. Wow! Open source game programming!

#15 3 years ago

Maybe to really up the challenge factor you should take people's rule suggestions, and see if you can implement them.

#16 3 years ago

Awesome, I'd love to do something like this someday if I ever have some time.

#17 3 years ago

I've seen Brian demo his software in person last January at Arcade Expo, and it's really an impressive project. I have to say though Brian, I'm pretty curious how it all works when the rules start getting complicated. I totally get how you got this far so fast, your demo was very convincing.

But what about when you're really implementing rules, and are stacking modes, and things become complicated? That's not something that seems configurable with a text file, you're going to have to be really coding at that point I presume.

#18 3 years ago
Quoted from Aurich:

But what about when you're really implementing rules, and are stacking modes, and things become complicated?

Actually that's not too bad. In MPF lots of stuff is broken down into modes. So you might have a base game mode, a skill shot, a combo tracker, a counter for super jets, a mode tracking the progress towards multiball.. so there might actually be 5-10 "modes" running even when the player thinks there's only one mode running.

So far also the "real" coding is just little things here and there. You might need to drop into Python to build some logic blocks that catch a bunch of different scenarios based on what's been completed and spit out some event, but they're pretty standalone and small chunks of code.

Really though I don't want to focus too much on "config files versus Python," rather, I want to focus on even if it's something super complex that requires a bit of Python here and there, it's still really fast to put a game together. I can't imagine any one element that would take more than a few days to figure out.

All that said, yeah, what the hell.. go ahead and throw some stumpers to me! When we're further along with MPF it would be fun to do an actual community driven version of a game. (Give us like 6 months to finish up the core MPF stuff first though.)

#19 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

Of course there is no scoring or music or light shows......

Uh............

#20 3 years ago

I assume there is no trouble shooting either, which is at least 80% of the battle. I'm not against you, I'm just putting it in perspective.

#21 3 years ago

I watched while Brian debugged a hardware problem at Chicago Expo. His framework looked like an excellent platform. I'm really excited to see how far you can take this. I'm sure you will exceed just about everyone's expectations. Good Luck!

#22 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

All that said, yeah, what the hell.. go ahead and throw some stumpers to me!

Hmm, I really don't know Demolition Man, but I'll think about it.

I've got to find time to mess with this. Too busy with other projects, but maybe after you're done with the core I can make time.

#23 3 years ago
Quoted from shakethatmachine:

I assume there is no trouble shooting either, which is at least 80% of the battle.

Eh, yes and no. Remember this is running on MPF which has more than 1000 hours into it. So it's not like you can write a game from scratch-scratch in 3 hours.. it's if you have MPF you already have 1000 hours of work done for you.

I mean sure, there's certainly troubleshooting that will be needed with game specific configs, and there will be bugs in MPF, but the idea is that MPF is solid and does the hard work, so there's not too much to screw up when it comes to the specifics of programming a game.

#24 3 years ago

Thank you for sharing. I hope to have a custom table at some point down the road. Slowly accumulating the parts. I don't know if I've got the skill, but I'm willing to give it a shot.

#25 3 years ago
Quoted from roffels:

Thank you for sharing. I hope to have a custom table at some point down the road. Slowly accumulating the parts. I don't know if I've got the skill, but I'm willing to give it a shot.

A fully-custom machine is what got us started on this, and we realized that it was really hard to pull it off. Even with the tools that were available (which have been used to make really great machines), it required a ton of work to get a game playable.

So we started making the code we were writing more generic so it could be used on other machines, and eventually MPF was born. Now you don't have to worry about coding nearly as much, and can focus more energy on building an awesome physical game.

Maybe someday we'll get back to our custom project. There are soldered copper habitrails and crudely vacuformed ramps just waiting to be tinkered with again, but we're not done with MPF yet, so it will have to wait!

#26 3 years ago

As a fellow programmer, I applaud you.

#27 3 years ago

Next I just added sound and music. I added a loop that plays while the player is waiting to plunge, and then a background track for the mode. I also added a bunch of various sound effects for the jets, slings, ramps, and targets (different sounds for hitting a lit & unlit target).

MPF's sound system is pretty advanced. You can have multiple tracks (music, voice, sfx, etc.) and each track has it's own properties (number of simultaneous sounds playing, volume & ducking, etc.) Then you map sounds to various events. All the sound mapping is done at the mode level, so higher priority modes can block sound mappings from lower priority ones and stuff like that.

Demo:

» YouTube video

Total time for this step: 45 min. Total time on the project so far: 4 hours, 0 min.

Full game config has been updated here:

https://github.com/missionpinball/mpf_demo_man

Next? Dunno.. I think I'll maybe add a skill shot, combo tracking, and super jets? (I'm just making this up.. What do you want to see?) I could do some kind of game mode.. hit a shot to light a target. Hit that lit target. You get multiball with jackpot lit while you have multiple balls. Yeah, actually, I'll do that too I guess. Should just be a few hours for all of this.

#28 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

All that said, yeah, what the hell.. go ahead and throw some stumpers to me! When we're further along with MPF it would be fun to do an actual community driven version of a game. (Give us like 6 months to finish up the core MPF stuff first though.)

Basic pseudo-complicated game for a challenge, threw in a bunch of independent timers and some objectives so that modes need access and control over shared timer and variable shot value data:

1) Right ramp claw is available at the start of game. Drop the ball into one of the five available positions to light a "mode" on the major shot (besides the claw ramp) left-right corresponding to the position (left orbit, left ramp, center mini ramp, center ramp, right orbit.)

2) Each of these "modes" lights a shot for value advance and starts a timer. When a lit shot is hit it scores the current shot value and increases the value of that shot by 100k, increases the value of all other lit shots by 50k, and decreases the value of any unlit shot by 10k, or something along those lines. Any number of "modes" can be active at a given time but expire after 30 seconds of non-multiball play. The value of each shot should be tracked on the DMD in some way that shows the relative value of each shot (bar graph or something). Each mode/shot timer is independent and can be extended by hitting the claw and selecting the same drop location multiple times. Shot value progression is stopped when any of the other shot values drop to some minimum value, say 50k.

3) Qualify multiball by "locking" balls in the computer scoop (virtual lock) up to five or six balls, whatever the game allows. I believe it's five. Relight lock by hitting car crash. After hitting the computer shot, claw ramp is disabled/diverted for 10 seconds x number of balls locked. Major shot timers are paused during this period and shot value advance is disabled. Hitting the claw ramp and then the left orbit to the rear saucer combo starts the multiball.

4) Major shot value is locked and timer stopped after ten seconds of multiball play or after one additional advancement of the shot value and cannot be advanced further during multiball.

5) Multiball Jackpot scored when a given shot reaches a point threshold scored during multiball. Let's say 1 million base points scored to get a jackpot worth 10 Million x #of balls in play. Getting those shot values up ahead of time means more frequent jackpots in addition to higher base value per shot.

6) Super jackpot on claw ramp when all five other major shot jackpots have been awarded.

7) "Mode" timers resume after multiball.

Yellow Standups start 10-second shot doubler timers on a corresponding major shot, but corresponding shot is reversed left-right from the claw positions. Leftmost standup doubles right orbit, etc. Hitting a shot while the doubler is lit also advances that shot value by 20k. This is active during multiball.

9) If all five standup timers are activated at the same time , 15 second playfield doubler. If an odd number of balls are in play (not including eye scan held ball but including single ball play), playfield tripled instead. Hitting standups during the doubler time adds ~10/(#balls in play) seconds to the timer.

10) Eye Scan holds a ball during multiball as long as all major shot timers are inactive and shot values are locked. Ball is released via car crash or when only one ball is live.

11) Eye scan during single ball play holds ball and cycles the standup target lights. Launch button or topmost thumb buttons releases ball for a hurry-up shot with only one attempt allowed by timer. Hitting the lit standup awards mini-jackpot with base value determined by the standup's associated major shot value. Something like the T2 cannon shot but spread across the separated standups and requiring a flip after ball release.

12) Combos and pop bumper hits advance bonus value. This should be roughly equivalent to the existing demoman combo bonus rules so that there is a valid non-jackpot strategy available.

13) Upper lane rollovers advance bonus multiplier

The idea is that single-ball play should be pretty quick and on the fly, you have more time to breathe and shoot specific shots towards a major payoff only during multiball. Progression is limited by the need to hit all major shots occasionally, but you can go all in and get the value of one shot up if you want to try that approach. You can also "spot" value on shots you're not that great at by lighting them while another shot is lit. Not all features are used adequately. The claw shot is overly important, but this is also true on the normal Demo Man ruleset.

I can clarify or polish if you think it's intriguing enough to proceed with. It might be crap, I'm just making this up.

#29 3 years ago

Again, I applaud you. However, this has little to do with programing (and trouble shooting) a game from the ground up.

#30 3 years ago
Quoted from Law:

Basic pseudo-complicated game for a challenge, threw in a bunch of independent timers and some objectives so that modes need access and control over shared timer and variable shot value data:

Ok, so first, if this is just the crap that you made up on the fly, I definitely look forward to programming more games with your rules!

Everything you're asking for is straightforward and I believe we can do much of it with MPF config files alone (and as they are today). Everything in MPF is "event" based.. so shots, ball movements, switches, stuff you display, starting and stopping shows, sounds.. all of it either generates or consumes events. All those events are available to be consumed via the config files also.. no Python coding necessary.

MPF has this concept of "timers" which themselves are started and stopped by events, and other events can cause them to start, stop, pause, speed up, etc. You can have as many as you need at once, counting whatever they want, at whatever speed they want, all in different states. So your game having all these timers that are all nested isn't that bad. Just break it down into little chunks and it's fine.

MPF also has this concept called "Logic Blocks" which are these things that watch for events (or series of events), in order or not (depending on the config), and then they themselves trigger other events. (So but the events they're watching and what they start can be timers.) They're like building blocks for game logic, all done in the config files, and they are how we'd do all the things like different events and outcomes based on the number of complete shots, number of lit targets, etc.

(Anyone reading this who actually might want to write their own game.. more details on this game logic stuff is here.)

So anyway.. everything you're suggesting sounds awesome and totally doable. There are a few core things for MPF on our roadmap that I'd want to build out first (for example we have an idea for managed score & shot multipliers which would be easier than writing a mode with every scoring entry entered again at 2x its lower level value) before going after this exact plan, but overall I don't see any of this being a problem. I would think it could all be done in a few days.

(And, dang, this game sounds really cool and now I kind of want it.

#31 3 years ago

Ok since the first item on Law's list is about the claw, I guess I better get that working. MPF has this concept called "Scriptlets" which are little bits of Python code you can add into your game to do things you can't do with the config files. This is what I was talking about before when I said that MPF is still easy to use even if you need to code here and there.

It took some testing to figure out which limit and position switches meant what, but once I got that figured out, creating the scriptlet was easy. This step took a total of 1 hour, 15 min, bringing the total time spent on the project to 5 hours, 15 min.

Here's a demo of the claw & elevator working:
» YouTube video

Game code is updated in GitHub. Here's a specific link to the custom code I wrote to control the claw & elevator:
https://github.com/missionpinball/mpf_demo_man/blob/master/scriptlets/claw.py

I'll work on this again tomorrow since my original goal was to see how far I could get in a day, but due to life getting in the way I only got to spend 5 hours on it today.

#32 3 years ago

While this is awesome progress, how long it takes You to do this is far from a 1:1 mapping for how long it will take someone new to the framework. I can also get a barebones game working in PyProcGame in this amount of time (and I know you could as well), but the point is a new person will take longer.

You have 500 pages of documentation. It will take someone hours to read that and longer to fully digest it.

Do know that I applaud your work and I love the progress toward an epic goal that we both agree on, I just don't want you to set expectations to a point that are beyond reason. I think if a non-programmer could get to where you did in a few hours (yaml and flipping) in about a day, that'd still be a win for that person.

#33 3 years ago
Quoted from Mocean:

While this is awesome progress, how long it takes You to do this is far from a 1:1 mapping for how long it will take someone new to the framework.

Well, compared to learning 6809 Assembly programming, MPF should be considerably quicker...

#34 3 years ago

First I want to say I find this all fantastic and your a genius.

I know nothing of programming at all so my question is this.

Are you also programing for when a switch or assembly fails and you can still continue gameplay with some sort of work around even if limited?

Are you programming for the safety issues such as locked on Flashers,Coils etc?

Just curious about all of this and will be following this thread like a hawk.

#35 3 years ago

Making things accessible and open source is the path to success in projects like this, as long as the main trunk is maintained appropriately. Lots of eyes and an active community to ask for advice goes a very long way. Sure, troubleshooting can be rough, but the same can be said of troubleshooting an already coded pinball machine. Good thing we have people around on pinside that can sniff out a bad transistor from two thousand miles away.

Out of curiosity, and mostly because you list support for the P3-ROC, do you have any plans for supporting the P3 platform in a more comprehensive fashion? How easy is it to incorporate arbitrary peripherals or communicate with the Unity engine in the MPF? Would that sort of feature be something you guys would host?

#36 3 years ago

I'm a little confused, but once completed this will be a completely new set of rules, animations, calls outs, etc? If so, what hardware do I need to install or is it just a chip like some of the others?

#37 3 years ago

Awesome!

#38 3 years ago
Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

I'm a little confused, but once completed this will be a completely new set of rules, animations, calls outs, etc? If so, what hardware do I need to install or is it just a chip like some of the others?

Brian's just doing this as a proof of concept for his python based pinball framework. If this Demo Man project ever got released, you'd need a PROC board (or similar) and a computer to run it on. Just like any existing PROC style project.

And Brian, call it whatever cute name you want, but that claw control 'mode' is python code. Games take code. Config files (which is really a new programming language you made up, too) alone will end up with boring, linear, flat games. Quickly built, sure, but dull.

I should point out that I think the MPF project is great. It's no small feat to write a whole framework to build games on. Hell, I couldn't do it, and I've written a whole game in a different framework already. I just think it's being oversold a bit.

#39 3 years ago

Obviously some of what he's doing right now is just for show. No one is going to code their custom game in a handful of hours. But it's obvious once you understand the tools that the barrier to entry is very low.

There's a huge difference between being a good enough programmer to set up everything he's done so far from scratch, vs being able to handle writing some simple code to make switches on a custom toy work.

I don't even know Python, and I'm not a real coder, but I've built a lot of code heavy Flash websites in my time for instance, I'm a decent ActionScript programmer. I'm totally confident I could pick up Python well enough to add custom bits to a MF project.

That's a lot of leverage for someone like me. If you have more coding skills that I do then you're even more set.

Does that mean everyone can churn out a commercial quality code rewrite in a week? No, of course not. But if you're interested in trying to learn to write your own rules, or making a retheme or 2.0 style game? There's now something very accessible for you to start with.

#40 3 years ago
Quoted from Aurich:

But if you're interested in trying to learn to write your own rules, or making a retheme or 2.0 style game? There's now something very accessible for you to start with.

To be fair, there's always been pyprocgame, which is extremely accessible as well. MPF is just taking a different tactic on some things, but procgame has a lot of the same built in parts, comes with a 'starter' game that you can have up and flipping very fast, etc. You may not be able to make an EM clone in it with just a few config files, but you could do it with pretty simple python in very short order.

So it's not that "There's now somehing .." more "There's now another option to join the existing ..."

#41 3 years ago

Sorry if I came off too aggressive, I'm not trying to make this a pyprocgame versus MPF thread since (1) there are already a lot of those, and (2) they're both free & open source projects, so arguing about which is better is about as productive as asking, "Which flavor of Linux is best?"

So I won't talk about how easy anything is to do because I realize that not everyone is me and I don't want to suggest that MPF is the only easy way to do things.

Bottom lines:

We're building this MPF thing.
It's free and open source.
We're very excited about it.
We started in June.
We have 1500 hours into it so far.
We have no plans to slow down.
We think it's easy to use.
We wrote a lot of documentation.
If you want to create your own pinball machine software, check it out.
If you're not a programmer, check it out anyway before you decide you can't do it.
If you don't want to use MPF, that's fine with us as long as you still create your own pinball machines and bring them to shows so we can play them!

That is all.

#42 3 years ago

Hey Brian,

I like what you've done, and the documentation is fantastic.

Keep going the path you are on, and don't slow down.

#43 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

So I won't talk about how easy anything is to do

You should! You're not making product comparisons, I was the one who inadvertently brought that up I guess. I think the work you're doing is fantastic, and very accessible, and you should continue to tout and promote it!

#44 3 years ago

awesome resource, will be diving into this in the near future, thanks so much for your efforts

#45 3 years ago

Watching your progress here is inspiring. Thanks for sharing a practical application of the Mission Pinball Framework, Brian. Following along with lots of curiosity and interest in my own future project.

#46 3 years ago

Haven't checked it in a while Brian but wondering if you have any support for servos/motors included at the moment? I imagine you can probably control them to some extent using the PROC or a PD16 but support for higher level control out to an Arduino for other devices would be great.

#47 3 years ago
Quoted from lachied:

wondering if you have any support for servos/motors included at the moment?

No. We have plans for intelligent device support for motors, steppers, and servos. They're each a bit different, but the idea is we'll have methods that expose logical things you'd want to do. (For a motor, tell it to move left or right and the device code handles the outputs, or for a stepper telling it to move to the 9 o'clock position and it keeps track of where it is, it's zero index, etc.)

For servos, we're pretty much ready to go with that but we don't know which hardware people are using. FAST has plans for a servo control daughterboard which we'll be able to use. I suspect that people using a P-ROC will add an additional USB-based servo controller? I've got a few different ones from Sparkfun and Pololu. Which ones are you thinking?

#48 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

FAST has plans for a servo control daughterboard which we'll be able to use

FAST Servo Controller Daughterboard w/ FAST I/O 0804

I am so stoked to get the FAST Servo Controller Daughterboards (and the rest of the boards) back from manufacturing!

I have seen Brian work his magic in person and on videos plenty of times, but I still get stoked seeing games coming to life so quickly!

Aaron
FAST Pinball

#49 3 years ago

This is awesome and I want it on.My.demo man

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From: $ 29.00
Boards
KAHR.US Circuits
$ 269.99
$ 40.00
Lighting - Other
Rock Custom Pinball
3,100
Machine - For Sale
Cleveland, OH
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