(Topic ID: 62302)

Fixing Inserts - Fogged, Peeling, Delaminated, with UV Curing Resin

By calico1997

8 years ago


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There are 197 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 4.
28
#1 8 years ago

I was not happy with the peeling, fogged, and delaminating inserts on my Arabian Nights. Most of the inserts were looking pretty bad. Advise on the web usually mentions trying Krazy glue, Varathane, or just redoing the whole playfield with a full restoration. I was not liking those options and noticed when I wiped with playfield with alcohol, the liquid seeped into the crevasses around the insert and made them look great, until the alcohol dried up. Having work experience with UV curable resins, I tried the following method and it works so well, I wanted to share. The resin used is Simoniz Fix It Pro Clear Coat pen applicator. It goes for less than $10 on Amazon. The UV curing unit is used for UV nail polish. It is a Red Carpet manicure light Pro 45 and goes for about $38 on Amazon. The procedure: (note, this works on original playfields that have not be re-clearcoated.)

1. Set the playfield more or less level so the liquid resin does not run. It is watery.

2. Use a needle to clean out any open groove along the edge of the lifting insert where wax and dirt build up.

3. Apply the UV resin in a bead along the edges of the insert where you see while lifting. See photos. In moments, the resin will bleed into the insert where it is delaminating from the playfield clearcoat. Allow some time if needed. The UV resin will NOT dry up unless there is bright UV light present. If the resin does not fully soak into the lifting area, you can try to apply a little pressure to "work it in".

4. Once you are satisfied with the results, wipe up the excess resin from the surface of the playfield so the insert is clean. If you have a small chip on the insert, you can apply a drop of resin to fill the chip.

5. Place the UV light source over the repair area and turn it on. This model shuts off after 45 seconds. I gave 4-5 does of light to fully cure the resin where it seeped deeply into the insert. You could also use sun light, but its not easy to get access to the sun with a pinball machine and these nail manicure lights are more powerful. Note: this model has an open base that shines UV directly on the playfield. Other models I looked at do not have an open base and would not work!

6. Wipe the surface again with a cotton pad to remove any reside. There will always be some liquid residue on the surface of the cured resin that needs to be wiped off. You are finished and can move on to the next insert. This is an extremely hard, clear, durable coating that should last for many years!

a.JPG b.JPG c.JPG d.JPG e.JPG f.JPG

#2 8 years ago

More pictures...

g.JPG h.JPG IMG_1205.JPG IMG_1206.JPG

#3 8 years ago

brilliant!

#4 8 years ago

Water thin super glue, sold at hobby stores, works the same way.

This technique is also mentioned in Clay's Pinball Pages.

#6 8 years ago

That is awesome, thanks for sharing. Good pics.

#7 8 years ago

I've had some luck with water thin super glue, but I've also had some issues with it drying too fast in some circumstances. If this is UV resin is as water thin as it looks, but stays wet to allow you to work with it for a little longer, I think this could be great. Thanks for the info.

#8 8 years ago
Quoted from Rum-Z:

I've had some luck with water thin super glue, but I've also had some issues with it drying too fast in some circumstances.

Same thing happened to me and I used the slow trying super glue. I had two spots. First spot worked fine, but second spot dried really quick and the end result isn't as nice as it could have been had it dried slowly. I'm thinking of remove it.....carefully....and trying this approach.

Thanks for the tip!

Cheers,
Duane

#9 8 years ago

This stays wet until you are ready for curing to start with the UV. It also wipes up with no effort. It is water thin. Super Glue dries too quickly to work with in some cases. And wiping it up without gluing your rag, cotton pad, or fingers to the play field can be difficult. Also the super glue at the surface tends to turn cloudy and very brittle within a few days of the ball rolling across it. The UV resin is flexible a stays perfectly clear.

#10 8 years ago

I wonder if there are any issue putting a clear coat over the resin?

#11 8 years ago

All the guitar repair shops are using UV for repairs with great results.

They tell me it's a little more brittle that the orig finish, but not enough to be a problem.

Thank you for sharing!!!

#12 8 years ago

I might have to try this.

#14 8 years ago

Very slick Calico. Thanks for sharing.

#15 8 years ago

Awesome idea, thanks for sharing!

Do you think this resin would work for filling in cupped inserts?

#16 8 years ago
Quoted from Schwaggs:

Awesome idea, thanks for sharing!
Do you think this resin would work for filling in cupped inserts?

Can't wait to hear comments on this. I have a couple of those I would like to fill in.

#17 8 years ago

Another tool for the tool box.....

#18 8 years ago

Amazing how your work life can effect you hobby sometimes. This thread is a keeper. Thanks.

#19 8 years ago

Very cool, going to have to try this out. Thanks

1 week later
#20 8 years ago

I would certainly think it could do a nice job on cupped inserts. The Uv resin is water thin, crystal clear, and flows nicely. It remains fully liquid until uv light hits it and does not shrink like clear coats or glues. I know people suggest super glue but what happens if you make a mistake and try to wipe it up....the glue glues itself to the wiper. The UV resin wipes up with no effort and can be reapplied if there's a mistake. Just make sure you like the look before applying Uv because then it hardens in seconds and becomes as hard as polyurethane. Please be careful if you buy some of the Simoniz Fix it Pro from Amazon. I ordered more from one source and while it advertised being the UV stuff, what I got said it now dries without UV which is NOT what you want to get. I got some from another supplier that still had stock of the right kind!

#21 8 years ago

Damn - I thought; hey, I'll file it for my next Restore.
Then just now I thought... you know; you need to glue in those Inserts on the Star Trek: Mirror Universe.

I may have to get some equipment now. ;D

#22 8 years ago

I am interested in trying this out on my family guy with a small divot in one of the inserts. I was wondering if you have actually put some plays on the insert now and if it is holding up well? Also, do you think it will work well when it is applied in a deeper puddle? It is a little difficult to see the divot in the picture, but it is noticeable in person.

I am testing out a 2 part clear right now, but it does not appear to be drying correctly. I do not want to risk ruining my PF with bad Clear.

Also, I have a UVB bulb that are used for reptiles, I wonder if that would work the same way? It does not have a purple glow to it though.

Here is a pic of my insert:

IMG_3138_zpsca2135cc.jpg

#23 8 years ago

I tried it today on a cupped insert in Flash and also used it on some chipped inserts. In my opinion it works better than water or solvent based clear coats because the UV resin does not shrink nearly as much. It hardens up nearly level with the playfield. Also very durable. The UV light needs to be in the 360 nanometer wavelength to work. (UVA). Not sure what the reptile light is. You should test a dab of UV resin on a piece of mylar or foil under your proposed UV light to make sure your light really does cure the resin. Usually takes 2-5 minutes.

#24 8 years ago

Thanks for the update! I believe the bulb said specifically UVB, but it is supposed to simulate sunlight...so who knows. I am trying to locate a Simoniz pen to play around with. I have also seen this product:

http://www.joann.com/lisa-pavelka-1-oz-magic-glos-uv-resin-1pk-clear/zprd_10987014a/

I wonder if this might work just as well?

#25 8 years ago

I am curious if a simple black light will work. If so, I may try this on my dw pf.

#26 8 years ago

I ordered some to try.
I have a TOTAN that I'd love to experiment on.

Thanks for the tip!!!

#27 8 years ago

I think that so called "Super Glue", sucks. One day it becomes neither super, or glue.

I really hate the fact that people recommend it for pinball repair. I would never do so.

I work with some high tech UV cured resins in repairing windshields. They can be great for certain applications. I hope that the one you are using holds up over time. The ones I buy are quite a bit more expensive and have served me well in my repairs over the years.

#28 8 years ago
Quoted from LEE:

UV cured resins in repairing windshields

I bet this would be a good choice as well.

#29 8 years ago

Just wanted to make a note that I received my order from Amazon and the product is slightly different.

The package states: "All new and improved" "No longer is sunlight required to cure"
It also states a 15 minute cure time.... which I guess is still a lot better than CA glue.

Not sure if this formula will work exactly the same, but we'll see.
Just pissed that I ordered the light too

#30 8 years ago
Quoted from Drano:

Just wanted to make a note that I received my order from Amazon and the product is slightly different.
The package states: "All new and improved" "No longer is sunlight required to cure"
It also states a 15 minute cure time.... which I guess is still a lot better than CA glue.
Not sure if this formula will work exactly the same, but we'll see.
Just pissed that I ordered the light too

Let us know when you try it out. I'd be very interested in hearing about the results.

#31 8 years ago

Ohhhhhhh nice! my CP could use some love

I'm curious about using it with a new decal...for the inserts that need to have decals re-applied.

#32 8 years ago
Quoted from Drano:

"No longer is sunlight required to cure"

Yeah I don't think that will work very well. You might try to order another bottle off of Ebay and make sure it is an actual picture and make sure it says cures by UV...that's what I did.

#33 8 years ago

Another thing a person could try is the clear finger nail polish. Used by many car guys to repair stone chips in the clear coat as it is just simply a scented lacquer. Of course, since this also air dries probably not much good for weeping in underneath clear sections that have lifted - but works just fine to fill holes.

#34 8 years ago
Quoted from loppydog:

Yeah I don't think that will work very well. You might try to order another bottle off of Ebay and make sure it is an actual picture and make sure it says cures by UV...that's what I did.

Same!

#35 8 years ago
Quoted from northvibe:

Ohhhhhhh nice! my CP could use some love
I'm curious about using it with a new decal...for the inserts that need to have decals re-applied.

I've used it up at the back of the playfield where it spells G E N I E. Works fine with decals applied over the UV cured resin. Just clean it with alcohol before adding the decals.

#36 8 years ago

OK, so I have been messing around with my UV clear I got in the mail. I am pretty sure I got a dud . I have tried to cure it with everything I can think of and it will not harden. After trying a couple different "black lights", I just set it outside all day today. Granted it was not very sunny, but there should have been enough to start the curing process. I am not sure what I can find locally that might work just as well. I was thinking the "knot Sense" might work, but then I read that it cures soft and pliable...

#37 8 years ago

Has anyone tried sanding this stuff after it hardens?

I definitely would like to try this if it works.

#38 8 years ago

So I found this product locally and I am trying it right now. It seems to harden well under a normal blacklight, but it might be a little soft. I will report back.

amazon.com link »

#39 8 years ago

I wonder if its thin enough to help hide some planking.....??

#40 8 years ago

The Hydro product is almost water thin. I have about 3 coats on my insert so far and it seems pretty good! The real test will be to see if it holds up in play.

1 week later
#41 8 years ago
Quoted from loppydog:

OK, so I have been messing around with my UV clear I got in the mail. I am pretty sure I got a dud.

Did you buy the ones out of China by chance?
I just assume that half the stuff being shipped out of Hong Kong on eBay these days is counterfeit.

#43 8 years ago
Quoted from Drano:

Did you buy the ones out of China by chance?

No it was from a seller from the states. No idea where they got it from though.

1 week later
#44 8 years ago

It is confusing that Simonize sells the UV curing touch up pen and then when you order it from Amazon, you get a non-UV curing pen which is probably something completely different. I got my first good UV curing resin pens from a store in the mall called "As Seen On TV". Here is a link to what is probably a safe bet and also pretty cheap:

It is DuPont Automotive Clear Coat UV curing Touch Up.Amazon.jpg

amazon.com link »

#45 8 years ago

The key thing here is you want something that is clear, dries hard and durable, and goes from a liquid to a solid without any off gassing of VOCs or shrinkage or bubbling. If you use something that has a water or solvent base, you will get bubbles, shrinkage, and it may never dry properly when soaked under the skin of a peeling insert. The UV resin will cure solid 100%, even if under a peeled insert because it hardens with light instead of with air.

#46 8 years ago

Some people were asking if you can use this on cupped inserts. Yes, it sort of works. It may be better than living with cupped inserts and is easier than fixing them "properly". A friend had me test it on a Flash game with badly cupped inserts. Enclosed are photos. The photos are sort of blurry because I was using a crappy phone camera in a dark room. Use the following steps. Make sure it is warm in the room. Cold temps will cause the resin to be thick and you want it to flow as much as possible.

1. clean the insert to be fixed with alcohol and let dry.
2. level the playfield as much as possible. A pinball should not roll up or down on it.
3. depress the UV pen multiple times to deposit a small puddle of resin at the center of the cupped insert.
4. keep adding resin, looking closely as you go. Add too little and you will get a ridge between where the playfield meets the insert. Add too much and the puddle will flow (in a taper) over the edge of the cupped insert. I would error on the side of too much resin. You can always wipe up any excess with a Qtip.
5. apply the UV light for about 5 minutes. This is a thick coating of resin, so 5 minutes with a strong light is needed to get it fully cured.
6. wipe up the surface - there will always be a thin, oily residue on the surface after it is cured the 1st time.

1.jpg 2.jpg
#47 8 years ago

Many people asked about why kind of black light works and what is most affordable. I found this works if you add an extra minute or so to the curing process. It is very low cost. Make sure the batteries are fresh and test it with the resin before applying to your playfield.

amazon.com link »

Portable 6 inch Blacklight - Amazon.jpg

#48 8 years ago

I have yet to try this, but I am so thrilled that you have taken the time to share.

Almost a must have for everyone's pin tool box.
In fact, Ill pet if you bulk found the right pen and UV light, pinheads would be happy to buy this as a kit!

Id love to see more posts of before and after from anyone else using this method. Quite impressive!

#49 8 years ago
Quoted from OLDPINGUY:

I have yet to try this, but I am so thrilled that you have taken the time to share.
Almost a must have for everyone's pin tool box.
In fact, Ill pet if you bulk found the right pen and UV light, pinheads would be happy to buy this as a kit!
Id love to see more posts of before and after from anyone else using this method. Quite impressive!

I considered it. But hey' the stuff is out there already. Good luck.

#50 8 years ago

So... can it be sanded? Supposedly if you used it on a cupped insert, it's possible that due to surface tension it could be slightly convex. I'm wondering if that could be sanded flat?

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