(Topic ID: 213197)

First pin ball machine

By Heisman

3 years ago


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  • 65 posts
  • 31 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by Heisman
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#1 3 years ago

Hey everyone! Matt here and I’m new. I am sure this question has been asked a million times so my apologies in advance. I have 2 daughters and my wife has agreed to let me buy my first pinball machine. At first I was all about the Guns N Roses but realized it might not be the best for the whole family. I am interested in The Simpsons Party but are there any others that folks on here would recommend?

2nd question: I have been in contact with a couple amusement companies both wanting about $6400 for Simpsons Partytime. I kind of feel like I have to buy one through a company so I get the warranty (because I have no idea what I’m doing) anyone have any idea of real market value on this thing? I don’t mind someone making some money off me I just don’t want to be the topic at dinner at being a dummy

Okay that’s it! Sorry all, super excited to join the pinball fam.

Matt

#2 3 years ago

Moderation notice:
This was created as moderator feedback thread that only you and moderators can see. Not very useful for you... moved to the Buying and selling advice subforum!

#3 3 years ago

The Simpsons Pinball Party aka TSPP, is a good game, it’s a deep rules players game, lots of stuff to shoot for, repetitive sounds and difficult to master, which is good usually. Not a bad choice for a first game. Something to consider: TSPP has been around for a long time, has aging parts, but a deep history of repair expertise floating around here.

Not to say you couldn’t find a reputable company to sell you one that will send out a repair guy that could fix it should something happen, but maybe consider a new game at that same price point that has new parts???

Others that come to mind for a first family pin... dialed in, guardians of the galaxy, wizard of oz, Stern Star Trek, Spider-Man VE (vault edition)

There’s many others, but unless you just love the simpsons madly, your ears may tire of it in a few months.

#4 3 years ago

GNR is definitely not family friendly. Good call.

The Simpsons Pinball Party is a good choice. It’s family friendly, has lots to do, and is reliable in general. I can see wanting to get a warranty. You can see what they’ve gone for in the Pinside Market Archive, but I’d say around $5000 for a Home Use Only (HUO) one.

If the machine is in beautiful shape, they deliver and set it up and give a decent warranty you’re probably not far off with value.

Guardians is a blast for a good player but it’s really tough. Spider-Man is a great pin.

#5 3 years ago

We got TSPP as our first pin. I'm glad we did, it's still a go to game for me personally and sees plenty of play from other people. It has a deep rule set to keep you coming back. I think we will be keeping it for a very long time!

#6 3 years ago

My thoughts are POTC. Great family friendly theme, kids love sinking the ship, and fun for adults too.

#7 3 years ago

You should certainly get the game you want, but if you are willing to spend that amount for a used game you might want to consider spending the same amount for an new Attack from Mars Remake Classic. Great family friendly game. And welcome to the fun world of pinball!

#8 3 years ago

You'll find that once you go under a playfield, and understand that each mechanism is controlled by switches of some sort, that most mechanisms are powered by coils (solenoids) and that there are tests to test each thing, you should be able to understand how most (all) solid state machines work. If you don't have a soldering iron, get one. Not the $5 harbor freight ones. Get a decent temp controlled soldering station and some rosin core solder. You'll need at least that for your minimum pinball repair tool.

If you're at all handy, you'll be able to troubleshoot at least the basic stuff in the beginning.

With that said, I don't think you need to go through an "amusement" company for your first machine. You will spend at least $1K more than you would from a private seller. Scour the Pinside marketplace, check your local CL, find someone in your area that is also a pinhead, as you'll need their help to troubleshoot for when (yes, when) things don't work. Also, with a $6500 budget, you have LOTS of machines to choose from. You can probably get 2 or 3 excellent machines for that money. Just something to consider.

Look at the Pinside rankings for ideas on what you'd like to play. Check locally for machines on location that you can actually play before buying. This is probably the most important piece of advice! Play before you buy!

Good luck with your first machine! Be warned, they multiply!

#9 3 years ago

Welcome to the hobby!

I would probably go for a new title like Star Wars, Attack From Mars Remake, or Guardians, so you can immediately enjoy it without doing maintenance. Just look for a gently used one in the pinside marketplace with low plays that has not been on route. For an older 20 year old game like GNR, assume that you will probably need to do maintenance, which is fine if you are up to the challenge of learning. I certainly enjoy fixing up games.

If you are going to buy a used 10-20 year old game, I would definitely recommend buying from a dedicated collector through pinside. Look for a game that has had a complete top side tear down, every single rubber and light bulb changed out for new, flippers completely rebuilt, remote battery holder installed. I don't see an advantage of going through a dealer. Don't feel like you have to go through a dealer. Buying from a dedicated collector here on pinside should be just as good.

Best thing is to make friends with local collectors, they are your best support. Go to your local barcade and try to make some friends with fellow pinheads. Just about every fellow collector will be more than happy to help you.

Look in the pinside marketplace archives to get a feel for a good price for a specific game.

Your fellow pinsiders will be glad to help and answer all your questions. Definitely ask questions here before you take the plunge! We're here to help!

#10 3 years ago

Star Wars would be a great family pin. Although it can get really confusing. TSPP is also a good option.

#11 3 years ago

I have a 6 and 10 year old. Just got in the hobby. I went with dialed in. We all love it. Super amazing kid magnet...

Now getting a Total Nuclear Annihilation, as a pure shooter and co op game.

#12 3 years ago

I recommend against buying from a retailer, unless you’re buying a brand new game in the box. Retailers charge significantly more than hobbyists do, and I’ve seen little evidence that premium is justified. Just my opinion.

Anyone who owns a pinball machine needs to learn how to work on one anyway — these things require regular maintenance, and no retailer wants to make a house call every few months in perpetuity. You’ll be taking the glass off yourself sooner or later. Don’t worry, it’s not rocket science, and Pinside is a fantastic resource for tech help.

Having said that, if you’re thinking of spending $6k anyway, why not look into brand new games where the internal moving parts aren’t all 20 years old? Dialed In! is a fantastic brand new game. So are Game of Thrones (surprisingly kid-friendly), Wizard of Oz, Metallica, and Total Nuclear Annihilation (although the waitlist for that game is several months long). Take a look at Stern and Jersey Jack Pinball’s websites to see what they’re currently making.

#13 3 years ago

Definitely avoid a retailer, especially if your budget is 6k+.

Buy something new from JJP or Stern. I'd suggest Dialed In!

#14 3 years ago

I don't think buying from a retailer for your first pin is a bad idea if the retailer is reputable. Sure you end up paying more but you get the ability to try pins out and support. It is helpful to learn pricing on games you are interested and be aware of what premium you are paying for a game. Things like nib Stern games should have similar pricing no matter where you buy from. You just end up paying tax and maybe a little extra for shipping. It's still nice when you just write a check and game gets delivered and setup in your home. Retailer may also provide a warranty or be able to send out a tech to fix problems.

Popular older games like TSPP make have a high premium like you see on ebay. It might be better to shop around for a game like that. I would definitely try to play as many pins as you can to see what you like. New pins are pretty pricey and there are a lot of other pins out there that are fun and cheaper.

#15 3 years ago

You can use Pinside to help find Pinside members that live near you, and since you live in a major metropolitan area there should be quite a few. Click on Community at the top of the page, then on Pinsiders, then use the map to help find them. Reach out to a few members near you and you may find one that will help service any pinball machine you buy, and of course the forums here on Pinside are a great place to obtain advice when something on your machine needs to be serviced. Those Pinside members near you may also have machines of their own, and frequently they will welcome someone to come and visit them to play their machines - you may find something your family enjoys playing that way to help you know what to look for. An experienced Pinsider could also help you in using the Pinside Marketplace to help find machines being offered for sale by Pinsiders.

I'd strongly recommend buying your first pin locally so you can see and play it before taking it home.

#16 3 years ago

For your first pin I would pass over simpsons. It's an amazing game but IMO it plays pretty difficult and won't be as much for for new players. You are better off getting a game with longer ball time and a little more flow. Star trek pro would be a good starter. Other advice above is good too for options.

#17 3 years ago

To quote Auntie (Tina Turner) in Beyond Thunderdome, perhaps you should let "chance decides" and keep a eye on Craig's List and eBay in your area. There's a decent looking Capt Fantastic on Washington DC CL right now (in Dunkirk) for $2500. I picked up my first pin (Mata Hari, probably not the best family friendly pin on Ebay for $830 a little work and about $100 worth of parts and I was rolling. Of course that was about a grand ago, the more you replace/upgrade the more you think you need too!

#18 3 years ago

If you’re looking at new games make sure to call a distributor like Game Exchange of Colorado, Cointaker, or Tilt Amusements and ask for a price.
The advertised price on these games is usually not what you will actually pay. It’ll be hundreds less, shipped to your door.

#19 3 years ago
Quoted from Chosen_S:

The Simpsons Pinball Party aka TSPP, is a good game, it’s a deep rules players game, lots of stuff to shoot for, repetitive sounds and difficult to master, which is good usually. Not a bad choice for a first game. Something to consider: TSPP has been around for a long time, has aging parts, but a deep history of repair expertise floating around here.
Not to say you couldn’t find a reputable company to sell you one that will send out a repair guy that could fix it should something happen, but maybe consider a new game at that same price point that has new parts???
Others that come to mind for a first family pin... dialed in, guardians of the galaxy, wizard of oz, Stern Star Trek, Spider-Man VE (vault edition)
There’s many others, but unless you just love the simpsons madly, your ears may tire of it in a few months.

Thank you so much! This is great feedback. Took me a bit to understand how to reply lol! Dialed in looks pretty awesome as does The Big Lebowski (doing some research on that at the moment). I think The Simpsons is cool, but I do worry about the repairs.... Thanks again!

#20 3 years ago
Quoted from chubtoad13:

If you’re looking at new games make sure to call a distributor like Game Exchange of Colorado, Cointaker, or Tilt Amusements and ask for a price.
The advertised price on these games is usually not what you will actually pay. It’ll be hundreds less, shipped to your door.

Awesome! Thanks so much, really appreciate it. Like I said, as someone in sales, happy for folks to make some money! I just don't want to be ripped off lol.

#21 3 years ago
Quoted from billv45:

To quote Auntie (Tina Turner) in Beyond Thunderdome, perhaps you should let "chance decides" and keep a eye on Craig's List and eBay in your area. There's a decent looking Capt Fantastic on Washington DC CL right now (in Dunkirk) for $2500. I picked up my first pin (Mata Hari, probably not the best family friendly pin on Ebay for $830 a little work and about $100 worth of parts and I was rolling. Of course that was about a grand ago, the more you replace/upgrade the more you think you need too!

My wife at this point has given up hope lol. My last hobby which I still have is a big salt water fish tank. I seem to go 180 MPH in the right or wrong direction! No opposed to getting my hands dirty, and I will probably end up with a GNR Pinball machine eventually anyway...Just locked away from the kids . I can see how this hobby can be addicting.

#22 3 years ago
Quoted from Boat:

For your first pin I would pass over simpsons. It's an amazing game but IMO it plays pretty difficult and won't be as much for for new players. You are better off getting a game with longer ball time and a little more flow. Star trek pro would be a good starter. Other advice above is good too for options.

Quoted from Boat:

For your first pin I would pass over simpsons. It's an amazing game but IMO it plays pretty difficult and won't be as much for for new players. You are better off getting a game with longer ball time and a little more flow. Star trek pro would be a good starter. Other advice above is good too for options.

THank you!

#23 3 years ago
Quoted from RoyF:

You can use Pinside to help find Pinside members that live near you, and since you live in a major metropolitan area there should be quite a few. Click on Community at the top of the page, then on Pinsiders, then use the map to help find them. Reach out to a few members near you and you may find one that will help service any pinball machine you buy, and of course the forums here on Pinside are a great place to obtain advice when something on your machine needs to be serviced. Those Pinside members near you may also have machines of their own, and frequently they will welcome someone to come and visit them to play their machines - you may find something your family enjoys playing that way to help you know what to look for. An experienced Pinsider could also help you in using the Pinside Marketplace to help find machines being offered for sale by Pinsiders.
I'd strongly recommend buying your first pin locally so you can see and play it before taking it home.

This is awesome, thank you. I did somehow locate a map in Pinside to figure out where the closest Simpsons PT machine was and was going to check it out but didn't realize other members are pretty cool with perhaps letting you play. That is awesome! Really glad I am taking the plunge into pin. I will absolutely check this out!

#24 3 years ago
Quoted from pinlink:

Definitely avoid a retailer, especially if your budget is 6k+.
Buy something new from JJP or Stern. I'd suggest Dialed In!

Thank you!

#25 3 years ago
Quoted from OnTheSnap:

I have a 6 and 10 year old. Just got in the hobby. I went with dialed in. We all love it. Super amazing kid magnet...
Now getting a Total Nuclear Annihilation, as a pure shooter and co op game.

Quoted from Guinnesstime:

GNR is definitely not family friendly. Good call.
The Simpsons Pinball Party is a good choice. It’s family friendly, has lots to do, and is reliable in general. I can see wanting to get a warranty. You can see what they’ve gone for in the Pinside Market Archive, but I’d say around $5000 for a Home Use Only (HUO) one.
If the machine is in beautiful shape, they deliver and set it up and give a decent warranty you’re probably not far off with value.
Guardians is a blast for a good player but it’s really tough. Spider-Man is a great pin.

Thank you!

#26 3 years ago
Quoted from jawjaw:

I don't think buying from a retailer for your first pin is a bad idea if the retailer is reputable. Sure you end up paying more but you get the ability to try pins out and support. It is helpful to learn pricing on games you are interested and be aware of what premium you are paying for a game. Things like nib Stern games should have similar pricing no matter where you buy from. You just end up paying tax and maybe a little extra for shipping. It's still nice when you just write a check and game gets delivered and setup in your home. Retailer may also provide a warranty or be able to send out a tech to fix problems.
Popular older games like TSPP make have a high premium like you see on ebay. It might be better to shop around for a game like that. I would definitely try to play as many pins as you can to see what you like. New pins are pretty pricey and there are a lot of other pins out there that are fun and cheaper.

Good feedback, really appreciate it!

Quoted from FatPanda:You'll find that once you go under a playfield, and understand that each mechanism is controlled by switches of some sort, that most mechanisms are powered by coils (solenoids) and that there are tests to test each thing, you should be able to understand how most (all) solid state machines work. If you don't have a soldering iron, get one. Not the $5 harbor freight ones. Get a decent temp controlled soldering station and some rosin core solder. You'll need at least that for your minimum pinball repair tool.
If you're at all handy, you'll be able to troubleshoot at least the basic stuff in the beginning.
With that said, I don't think you need to go through an "amusement" company for your first machine. You will spend at least $1K more than you would from a private seller. Scour the Pinside marketplace, check your local CL, find someone in your area that is also a pinhead, as you'll need their help to troubleshoot for when (yes, when) things don't work. Also, with a $6500 budget, you have LOTS of machines to choose from. You can probably get 2 or 3 excellent machines for that money. Just something to consider.
Look at the Pinside rankings for ideas on what you'd like to play. Check locally for machines on location that you can actually play before buying. This is probably the most important piece of advice! Play before you buy!
Good luck with your first machine! Be warned, they multiply!

Wow thank you so much! I really appreciate you and everyone else taking so much time to comment. I also have no idea if I am supposed to comment under each person or if there is an overall "thank you etc." lol so let me know if I have been obnoxious replying to everyone individual.

I can totally see how folks get addicted lol.

#27 3 years ago

I have a 10 yo and 12 yo. Take them somewhere to play some pins to see what they would like! I really thought my girls would love Dialed In and they did not. By letting them try some first it will get them more excited about it.

#28 3 years ago

He's doomed!

#29 3 years ago
Quoted from cerberusdog:

I have a 10 yo and 12 yo. Take them somewhere to play some pins to see what they would like! I really thought my girls would love Dialed In and they did not. By letting them try some first it will get them more excited about it.

Solid point, I guess I will prob. need the GNR for my office at some point

#30 3 years ago

If you do buy an older pin like GNR, be prepared to do some maintenance on it yourself. Invest in a soldering iron, multimeter and standard set of tools. No matter who you buy it from, there will always end up being some minor things to fix, like resoldering a broken wire, changing out a solenoid. Also, periodically cleaning with Novus and waxing the playfield is recommended. None of it is rocket science, but requires patience more than anything else. If you are willing to get your hands dirty it will be fun. Pinwiki is a great resource:

http://www.pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Data_East/Sega

This page describes how to repair games like GNR.

There is also a beginners page on pinwiki you might want to peruse. Lots of good stuff here.

As long as you are willing to get your hands dirty, it will be fun.

Another great web site for comparing different games and reading ratings:

http://ipdb.org

#31 3 years ago

My .02, don't think buying a new game means you will have to do less in repairs.

My TSPP is the only game in my small collection that hasnt needed serious repairs.

My NIB WOZ and GB both had issues that required me to get in there and replace parts.

Buying and maintaining a pin will require you to get your hands dirty, new or used. Luckily, in most cases, the repairs are simple and the mechanisms are fairly straight forward with many here on pinside willing to lend a hand.

I also echo what others have said, don't pick/buy one sight unseen.. even if its a drive, take the fam somewhere to play pins (or find the nearest pinball show and make the trek out)

#32 3 years ago

What are your thoughts on EM machines? With your 6K budget you can easily buy 6 real sweet EM's.
The nice thing about EM's is once they're setup & working properly, they don't need much repair.

#33 3 years ago
Quoted from kevmad:

If you do buy an older pin like GNR, be prepared to do some maintenance on it yourself. Invest in a soldering iron, multimeter and standard set of tools. No matter who you buy it from, there will always end up being some minor things to fix, like resoldering a broken wire, changing out a solenoid. Also, periodically cleaning with Novus and waxing the playfield is recommended. None of it is rocket science, but requires patience more than anything else. If you are willing to get your hands dirty it will be fun. Pinwiki is a great resource:
http://www.pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Data_East/Sega
This page describes how to repair games like GNR.
There is also a beginners page on pinwiki you might want to peruse. Lots of good stuff here.
As long as you are willing to get your hands dirty, it will be fun.
Another great web site for comparing different games and reading ratings:
http://ipdb.org

Thanks so much for the links and the tips! Really appreciate it. Couldn't help but hum GNR "Patience" while reading this. Its scary to think about doing this stuff myself but I guess that's how you learn!

#34 3 years ago
Quoted from arcadenerd925:

My .02, don't think buying a new game means you will have to do less in repairs.
My TSPP is the only game in my small collection that hasnt needed serious repairs.
My NIB WOZ and GB both had issues that required me to get in there and replace parts.
Buying and maintaining a pin will require you to get your hands dirty, new or used. Luckily, in most cases, the repairs are simple and the mechanisms are fairly straight forward with many here on pinside willing to lend a hand.
I also echo what others have said, don't pick/buy one sight unseen.. even if its a drive, take the fam somewhere to play pins (or find the nearest pinball show and make the trek out)

Interesting. Now with your new games do they come with like a warranty or anything or once you buy it, its all you?

#35 3 years ago
Quoted from poppapin:

What are your thoughts on EM machines? With your 6K budget you can easily buy 6 real sweet EM's.
The nice thing about EM's is once they're setup & working properly, they don't need much repair.

So I would consider going up to $10k but that's absolutely top limit. I have been researching the Big Lebwoski game and am kind of intrigued by it. Thoughts? I saw there were some threads on it and a little controversy surrounding.

#36 3 years ago

Guardians of the Galaxy Pro. $5,400 from a distro. Family friendly game, easy to understand objectives, easy multi-ball, Groot ball-eating toy that kids will love. New LCD screen. Great cabinet art.

#37 3 years ago
Quoted from Heisman:

So I would consider going up to $10k but that's absolutely top limit. What does EM mean? I have been researching the Big Lebwoski game and am kind of intrigued by it. Thoughts? I saw there were some threads on it and a little controversy surrounding.

#38 3 years ago
Quoted from Sinestro:

Guardians of the Galaxy Pro. $5,400 from a distro. Family friendly game, easy to understand objectives, easy multi-ball, Groot ball-eating toy that kids will love. New LCD screen. Great cabinet art.

Going to take a look at this!

#39 3 years ago
Quoted from jlm33:

Moderation notice:
This was created as moderator feedback thread that only you and moderators can see. Not very useful for you... moved to the Buying and selling advice subforum!

Thank you!

#40 3 years ago

Electro-mechanical games, the old school ones before solid state. Anywhere from 60's to 70's are great !!

#41 3 years ago
Quoted from Heisman:

Going to take a look at this!

#42 3 years ago
Quoted from Heisman:

So I would consider going up to $10k but that's absolutely top limit. I have been researching the Big Lebwoski game and am kind of intrigued by it. Thoughts? I saw there were some threads on it and a little controversy surrounding.

I haven’t been keeping up with it, so hopefully someone else can chime in, but last time I checked, that company’s solvency and the production of those games was VERY much in jeopardy. I STRONGLY recommend sticking with buying from either a local collector or an established pinball manufacturer that’s proven they can actually deliver games — companies such as Stern, JJP, or Spooky.

#43 3 years ago

Before you go buying your first pin take a trip to the nearest pinball location that has a good mix of games and play them.

https://pinballmap.com/dc

Buying a pinball machine is like buying a car so you probably want to test drive a few.

#44 3 years ago

Since you're in DC, you should take the family out to VUK Pizza in Bethesda, MD--it looks to be within an hour's drive. They have tons of awesome pins including some of the newest: Guardians of the Galaxy, Houdini, and my personal recommendation: Total Nuclear Annihilation. I haven't made the trip there myself yet, but I've heard nothing but good things about the place.

As i mentioned, Total Nuclear Annihilation (TNA) would be my pick. I've been following the production of it very closely, and it really looks to be a well-built, well-designed, and above all *fun* game. Their tech support is the best in the business, from what I've seen so far. Plus TNA has some really cool features, including a custom stereo that utilizes the cabinet for optimal bass, and an awesome soundtrack of original music by the game's creator. Code is past 1.0 at this point, and has been updated numerous times since release, even adding new features such as cooperative and team vs. team modes. I seriously could go on and on. With all the optional upgrades, i expect to be in around $6800 +/- when i take the plunge. I think the resale will be decent, but I'd expect to lose at least $500+ on any nib game when reselling.

Take that with a grain of salt, of course--the game's not necessarily for everybody. I've already decided to make it my first nib game, and i haven't even played it yet--so there's that too...

So get out to VUK or another pinball place and find what you like! There's tons of great choices out there, and many more on the way by the looks of things!

Welcome to the hobby...be sure to make room for more...because there *will* be more, the way this appears to be going!

#45 3 years ago

I second a trip to VUK. Awesome pin venue, really nice line up and well maintained. Lyman Tavern in NW actually had a TSPP in their line up when I last visited. Red Zone Grill in NoVa is also apparently a nice spot. (haven't been yet) I highly recommend that you at least try to play a couple of games prior to buying any pin outright. There are quite a few spots within an easy drive that offer multiple games-Volleyball House in Elkridge, Crab Towne USA in Glen Burnie, Holy Frijoles in Hampden are just a few others that I've been too and can recommend. If you're ever in Southern Maryland, drop me a line and I'd be happy to show you my modest collection. Welcome to the hobby and the insanity that is pinball.

#46 3 years ago
Quoted from pezpunk:

I haven’t been keeping up with it, so hopefully someone else can chime in, but last time I checked, that company’s solvency and the production of those games was VERY much in jeopardy. I STRONGLY recommend sticking with buying from either a local collector or an established pinball manufacturer that’s proven they can actually deliver games — companies such as Stern, JJP, or Spooky.

Roger that, thank you!

#47 3 years ago
Quoted from vaevictis:

I second a trip to VUK. Awesome pin venue, really nice line up and well maintained. Lyman Tavern in NW actually had a TSPP in their line up when I last visited. Red Zone Grill in NoVa is also apparently a nice spot. (haven't been yet) I highly recommend that you at least try to play a couple of games prior to buying any pin outright. There are quite a few spots within an easy drive that offer multiple games-Volleyball House in Elkridge, Crab Towne USA in Glen Burnie, Holy Frijoles in Hampden are just a few others that I've been too and can recommend. If you're ever in Southern Maryland, drop me a line and I'd be happy to show you my modest collection. Welcome to the hobby and the insanity that is pinball.

Thanks so much, I really appreciate it! I will take you up on that for sure. Can't wait to get started and I will Absolutely get to VUK! Thanks again.

#48 3 years ago
Quoted from frunch:

Since you're in DC, you should take the family out to VUK Pizza in Bethesda, MD--it looks to be within an hour's drive. They have tons of awesome pins including some of the newest: Guardians of the Galaxy, Houdini, and my personal recommendation: Total Nuclear Annihilation. I haven't made the trip there myself yet, but I've heard nothing but good things about the place.
As i mentioned, Total Nuclear Annihilation (TNA) would be my pick. I've been following the production of it very closely, and it really looks to be a well-built, well-designed, and above all *fun* game. Their tech support is the best in the business, from what I've seen so far. Plus TNA has some really cool features, including a custom stereo that utilizes the cabinet for optimal bass, and an awesome soundtrack of original music by the game's creator. Code is past 1.0 at this point, and has been updated numerous times since release, even adding new features such as cooperative and team vs. team modes. I seriously could go on and on. With all the optional upgrades, i expect to be in around $6800 +/- when i take the plunge. I think the resale will be decent, but I'd expect to lose at least $500+ on any nib game when reselling.
Take that with a grain of salt, of course--the game's not necessarily for everybody. I've already decided to make it my first nib game, and i haven't even played it yet--so there's that too...
So get out to VUK or another pinball place and find what you like! There's tons of great choices out there, and many more on the way by the looks of things!
Welcome to the hobby...be sure to make room for more...because there *will* be more, the way this appears to be going!

Thanks so much! I appreciate it and will def head out to Vuk. Can't go wrong with Pizza or pinball! I will also take a look at TNA, thank you for that.

#49 3 years ago

My 9 year old and her friend getting huge laughs out of selfies and emoji attack!

Zero regrets getting Dialed In as my first pin. I've been playing pinball for a grand total of about 2 months. I set DI to super easy mode, and broke 1 million once. Super satisfying, when you suck, but can still make progress through modes, and start some mini wizards.

3AB6AB52-D9E1-4277-8542-E9EB696F0733 (resized).jpeg

#50 3 years ago
Quoted from OnTheSnap:

My 9 year old and her friend getting huge laughs out of selfies and emoji attack!
Zero regrets getting Dialed In as my first pin. I've been playing pinball for a grand total of about 2 months. I set DI to super easy mode, and broke 1 million once. Super satisfying, when you suck, but can still make progress through modes, and start some mini wizards.

Haha! This is awesome. I am definitely going to spend some time this weekend looking at ones mentioned including Dialed In. Seems to be a popular one on here.

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