(Topic ID: 281774)

Economics of board repair or replace?

By Drain1

1 year ago


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  • 12 posts
  • 10 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Brewchap
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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    #1 1 year ago

    I have problems with a Stern -100 MPU and/or a Bally SDB. I am replacing header pins and connectors that are suspect. If I have to send these boards off for troubleshooting, parts and labor and pay shipping both ways, is it more economical to simply buy new "ultimate" boards?
    I am a long time EM guy struggling to get a Night Rider back to life. Please advise........
    Bob, in Vermont

    #2 1 year ago
    Quoted from Drain1:

    I have problems with a Stern -100 MPU and/or a Bally SDB. I am replacing header pins and connectors that are suspect. If I have to send these boards off for troubleshooting, parts and labor and pay shipping both ways, is it more economical to simply buy new "ultimate" boards?
    I am a long time EM guy struggling to get a Night Rider back to life. Please advise........
    Bob, in Vermont

    Buy an Alltek, use it for troubleshooting. If you are working on SS games, it is VERY handy to have a board that you can stick into any early game. Once you know where your problem is, that is 90% of the way towards a repair. Once you know, repair, and keep the board around. I don't follow my own advice, because I have an Alltek in my Eight Ball (the board was toast and not worth fixing). When I need it, I just pop that board into another game and find my issues.

    Also a good board repair place will let you know if the board is worth fixing or not.

    #3 1 year ago

    Bob -
    If you have to replace the header pins on the board, don't forget to replace the pins in the connector. They are going to be just as bad. GPE is a good source for pins and tools, although there are others. Mostly a matter of personal choice.

    #4 1 year ago

    I also recommend Alltek boards. Replace all three of the original boards and enjoy playing the game for the next 40 years instead of having to fix it multiple times. Also improves resale value of the game......your ad can say, "yes has all Alltek boards" and the game plays beautifully.
    Have fun.

    #5 1 year ago

    I replace boards all the time. Less time and hassle to replace parts on a board that is 40 years old.

    I have Alltek in all my early Bally SS.

    #6 1 year ago

    I'm of the other camp. I just learned to repair. I can diagnose and repair most ss issues in an hour or two. Learning electronics beats the shit out of tv. I've yet to meet a board beyond repair, although I'm sure they're out there.

    #7 1 year ago
    Quoted from wawhite92025:

    Also improves resale value of the game

    I'd rather have the original boards personally. At least include them with the game if you sale it. Allteks aren't bad, but I've had my issues with them.

    #8 1 year ago

    Alkaline corrosion is the biggest killer of that vintage Bally board. If they are corroded much at all, I’d replace.

    After that is the plating in the headers and the OEM chip sockets.

    AMI parts are next.

    If you have a non-corroded MPU, I’d vote fix. Otherwise, Alltek or Weebly.
    The driver boards are always repairable and worth it.

    Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
    Http://chrishiblerpinball.com/contact
    http://www.PinWiki.com/ - The new place for pinball repair info

    #9 1 year ago

    I've always done my own board work and its paid off. If you have to send
    off boards to be fixed, probably makes more sense to buy new replacements.
    As time permits, save the old board(s) and work on them to improve
    your skills.

    #10 1 year ago

    Wow, thanks for the comments/advice. I am replacing some header pins and harness connectors now. Will see if that gets me anywhere.
    FYI, it is a Night Rider with a Stern -100 MPU and a -22 SDB. Boots up with 7 flashes and can go to lamp test. But no displays, all dark and nothing
    on the solenoid test either. I can fire the solenoids by grounding the transistor.
    This is why I like EMs, and swore off SS games years ago.
    Bob, in Vt.

    #11 1 year ago

    Drain 1 -Bob -

    After you're done with the connectors, verify you have 240VDC on TP4 on the SDB, and whether you have around 190 VDC on TP2 of any of the displays.

    Also, when power up, after you turn on the machine, hold the flipper buttons in until the reset cycle is complete. (You should hear chimes). If the flippers both work, you've verified the flipper wiring.

    #12 1 year ago

    Weebly to me is the best choice for board replacement.

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