(Topic ID: 163116)

Dog suggestions please


By PavBall

2 years ago



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    #1 2 years ago

    I'm looking for a dog breed that is good in families, does not require lots of exercise, is happy in warm environments like Louisiana, and does not slobber or shed in unreasonable amounts. The dog would live inside the house with the family, not in the backyard.

    Tiger says an Italian Greyhound meets these requirements. I was hoping for a larger dog. What suggestions do you all have?

    Addition through edit for clarification: I never said no exercise. That was a huge jump from what I said by Whysnow and Beezleboob and completely recharacterized what I said unfairly and in a bad light. Thank you to those that did not jump to the conclusions of Whysnow and Beezleboob.

    #2 2 years ago

    Regular greyhound?

    #3 2 years ago

    Weimeraner fits all of your criteria except exercise, mine is a frisbee dog so I just throw the frisbee 30 minutes a day to get some of her energy out.
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=6&ved=0ahUKEwjf4-yens3NAhWD44MKHYsWBQQQFggZMAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdogtime.com%2Fdog-breeds%2Fweimaraner&usg=AFQjCNGcIjibfKq4noLpcs-Vn2sRzA6Otg

    image_(resized).jpeg

    #4 2 years ago

    Tough call. It depends on your definition of 'lots of exercise'. Do you have a large fenced in yard? Will you be able to walk it at least once a day? You say good with families; however, that also depends upon what is in the family. Some breeds are better with small children. ( For example, while the Italian greyhound is a very sweet breed they do tend to be very 'fragile' so maybe not a great choice with small kids that may grab a leg) What about other pets? Another dog or a cat? Do you have family or friends with pets that you will welcome into the home? If you don't want any shedding, then you are better off with the curly coated dogs like poodles and water spaniel. Some breeds shed constantly while others tend to blow out their coats a couple of times a year but have minimal shedding between those events. IS that OK? Most breeds will be good with a family if socialized properly; however, some have a predisposition toward bonding to a single person. As you would expect, hunting breeds that work with other dogs tend to be more social than sight hounds but that is simply a tendency. If you toss out some breeds that interest you, I think you may be able to get some better thoughts.

    #5 2 years ago

    Beagle. Bigger dogs are gonna slobber in the LA heat bro.

    If you want something that doesn't shed get a poodle or terrier but terriers are kind of nuts.

    All dogs need exercise man. Except maybe a pug.

    #6 2 years ago

    Levi is correct on this one. Dogs need exercise, and it's not fair to the dog to have an owner that doesn't want to commit at least an hour a day to walk the dog or throw the ball with them.

    My terrier isn't nuts at all - so I disagree with Levi on that one. She just has a bit of an attitude (see my avatar for evidence), but she's so low key she'll get trapped in a room and won't even bark to get out. We have to search the house for her at times.

    Good luck in your search - all dogs are amazing and awesome and deserving of someone's love.

    #7 2 years ago
    Quoted from beelzeboob:

    Levi is correct on this one. Dogs need exercise, and it's not fair to the dog to have an owner that doesn't want to commit at least an hour a day to walk the dog or throw the ball with them.
    My terrier isn't nuts at all - so I disagree with Levi on that one. She just has a bit of an attitude (see my avatar for evidence), but she's so low key she'll get trapped in a room and won't even bark to get out. We have to search the house for her at times.
    Good luck in your search - all dogs are amazing and awesome and deserving of someone's love.

    Dude I grew up with an Airedale and she was fuckin nuts. She didn't mellow out until she was about 8. All the other Terriers I knew are the same way. Nuts is a subjective term: I meant bad listener, ran around alot, very excitable. Biscuit was a great dog but I don't think I'd recommend the Terrier lifestyle to someone who is looking for a dog that doesn't need exercise.

    #8 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    does not require lots of exercise

    DONT GET A DOG!

    Until you change this idea then you probably should not own a dog.
    You sound more like a cat person, or possibly a goldfish to start.

    20
    #9 2 years ago

    get a rescue dog. you can get a purebred and save a dog from being put down.

    #10 2 years ago

    We got our dog from the Humane Society about 10 years ago. She has pretty much all the traits you're looking for. Likes to lounge all day, doesn't shed much, not a slobberer. Sweet as can be with everyone. Almost to the point of annoyance sometimes. If you stop petting her she will nudge your arm. She's a mutt though. We believe Whippet and Pitbull mix? A Pippet

    Actually if you look up Whippets characteristics they fit the bill for what you want. I think it may be the same as an Italian Greyhound though?

    #11 2 years ago

    My 12 pound 20 year old Parson Russell just now started to mellow out this year. And by mellow out, I mean that 5 weeks ago she started a fight with a foster Pit and promptly got her nose/jaw bitten, Sat night went after my 90 pound Pit mix over a bug they were chasing and ended up with a hole in her head and a jugular puncture that I thought for awhile was fatal, and this morning went after a 3 foot black rat snake in the yard. Her skin is so thin from age and past fights that a tiny nip turns into a big hole, and she's always the one to start the fights. We keep her separated for the most part, but you'd think she'd have learned a lesson or two along the way. Sigh.

    From the list above, none of the breeds are going to fit. Greyhounds do 35 MHP runs around the house before crashing and sleeping upside down for hours, and have terrible room-clearing gas. Italian Greyhounds are going to be too fragile for small children. Terriers are going to need lots of exercise and shed constantly. Weimeraners stay in the puppy stage forever and are going to need room to run and tons of exercise. Beagles want to run, shed, potentially drool, and howl/bay when bored.

    Go to the pound or look for local rescues, tell them your requirements, and they can put you in touch with a rescue dog that fits your needs. When I was doing rescue out of my house about 10 years ago, over half the dogs I pulled off death row were purebreds. Most private rescue work out of foster homes and will therefore know the dog better than one locked in a cage at the pound, so if you need something specific they can help answer questions about socialization, kids, housebroken, exercise, etc.

    http://www.lapaw.org/

    http://www.adoptapet.com/adoption_rescue/85614.html

    #12 2 years ago
    Quoted from Wickerman2:

    get a rescue dog. you can get a purebred and save a dog from being put down.

    Definitely get a rescue dog. Ours came with some baggage as he was an abused stray but he has done well in the two years we have had him.

    I definitely agree that dogs need exercise. That is part of the fun of having one to play catch with.

    11
    #13 2 years ago

    People need exercise too, that's why my dog takes me for a walk every night.

    #14 2 years ago

    Greyhounds are actually a wonderful breed and, personally, I would recommend them to anyone. I had two greyhounds (at different times) growing up and they were excellent pets. They do enjoying getting outside to run laps but they are pretty low-key dogs and are not hyper. They do love attention, but that can be said about most dogs and most greyhounds will just go lay down if they aren't being given attention. They managed just fine here in the Houston heat & humidity, but of course you need to keep them hydrated like any other breed. Although they are short-haired dogs, they do shed and you'll want to brush them periodically, but it's quite manageable. One characteristic that always stood out to me is that they are pretty schedule-driven dogs. They have an incredible internal clock and if you get them on a schedule in terms of when you'll be home, when they are supposed to be fed, walked, etc., then they'll expect to stick by it. That's not to say that they can't manage long days if you're going to be gone for a while. We were able to leave them at home for a ~12-hour day if we had to make a day trip somewhere and they were perfectly fine, but I'd say that would be the maximum amount of time to leave them alone without someone letting them outside. In regards to the gas issue that blondetall mentioned above, it's true, but we also found that only giving them a certain type or brand of dry dog food helped prevent that. We only fed our dogs once a day (as opposed to always leaving a bowl out) and they were perfectly fine and healthy.

    Overall though, they are pretty low-maintenance pets, in my opinion. Greyhounds are incredibly sweet dogs and are extremely loving. They do not lick and they seldom ever bark. They are very quiet and sleep a lot so it's not like you have to keep them entertained constantly. The only time they might slobber is when they're eating. Otherwise, they don't slobber at all.

    I sincerely miss our greyhounds and when the time comes that I want to get another dog, it will likely be a greyhound. There are so many of them that need good homes when they are retired from racing and forgotten about. Honestly, I think they serve a much greater purpose and get a lot more out of life as pets than they do as race dogs. They are usually retired when they are only 2-3 years old and on average they live to be 11-12 years so they have a ton of life and enjoyment left after retirement.

    So if you like Italian greyhounds but want a larger, less hyper, and less fragile version, then I would go with a greyhound.

    #15 2 years ago
    Quoted from SteveO:

    Definitely get a rescue dog. Ours came with some baggage as he was an abused stray but he has done well in the two years we have had him.

    I have mixed emotions on this. As far as a rescue puppy, go for it!!! However, an older dog can bring some psychological issues with him or her. We rescued one of our dogs at 2 yrs old and he had some fairly significant fear-based aggression. We have a lot of experience with dogs, walk ours three times a day, every day, rain or shine, have another extremely 'balanced' dog that serves as a great role model and worked with him quite a bit. He is really a good little dog now (had him over 4 years) My point is that I can easily speculate why the original owner turned him into the kill shelter. Aggressive dog, may have gone after other dogs, probably very territorial, etc. and an owner that wonders what happened to that cute little puppy that thought he had to be the boss. Now he has no aggressive tendency, not even with food. I think almost all dogs can be 'saved'; however, if you are not an experienced dog owner, know what you are getting into with a mature rescue, and are anxious to put in the work, you may want to go another route. Of course, our humane society will take back an animal that doesn't fit in, it's just something to be aware of.

    #16 2 years ago
    Quoted from AlexF:

    Actually if you look up Whippets characteristics they fit the bill for what you want. I think it may be the same as an Italian Greyhound though

    It's funny, I immediately thought about a whippet. They are much sturdier than an Italian greyhound. They do not, as a rule require tons of exercise but rather prefer short bursts of intense exercise (i.e. running). Very loving, couch potatoes and actually, the cold is their enemy so warm weather is fine and they have a very short coat so shedding is not a huge issue Downside is that you really need a fenced yard and they must always be kept on a leash because if they go, they are gone, you ain't gonna catch them and they will think nothing of running straight into the street.

    #17 2 years ago

    Rescue dog is the way to go. I would guess a shelter is not going to be the coolest place in LA anyway... You can see for yourself which dogs are best suited for the climate in real time. I would pick happy a mutt because its love for you will be unconditional. Good luck with your search

    #18 2 years ago

    Maybe this dog will do - no shed, no exercise, won't bite, or eat.
    image_(resized).jpeg

    #19 2 years ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    DONT GET A DOG!
    Until you change this idea then you probably should not own a dog.
    You sound more like a cat person, or possibly a goldfish to start.

    Just wow! I'm going to exercise the dog, but different dogs require different levels of exercise. If you think an English Bulldog would enjoy running and jogging with its owner every day as much as a boxer would you are flat kidding yourself.

    A pug does not require the same level of exercise as a Doberman. I Great Dane does not require the same level of exercise as a lab.

    Just because I'm looking for a low energy dog doesn't mean I should not have one.

    #20 2 years ago
    Quoted from beelzeboob:

    Dogs need exercise, and it's not fair to the dog to have an owner that doesn't want to commit at least an hour a day to walk the dog or throw the ball with them.

    Where did the idea come from that I don't want to play with the dog? That's a big jump from my asking about low energy dogs.

    No, I don't want to run a marathon with the dog every day. I want to sit in the back yard and throw her a ball. I want her not to shed and not to drool so she can come to work in the morning with me, I don't want to leave her home alone all day like so many people do.

    I'm surprised by some of the responses here. There is a perfect dog for all people that love animals, I'm just looking for one that will fit in with my situation.

    #21 2 years ago
    Quoted from Jaybird815:

    Weimeraner fits all of your criteria except exercise, mine is a frisbee dog so I just throw the frisbee 30 minutes a day to get some of her energy out.

    Thank you for this and some of the other good responses. I appreciate it. I will research the Weimeraner and the brown dog that I see it is related to.

    #22 2 years ago
    Quoted from Oldgoat:

    Tough call. It depends on your definition of 'lots of exercise'. Do you have a large fenced in yard? Will you be able to walk it at least once a day? You say good with families; however, that also depends upon what is in the family. Some breeds are better with small children. ( For example, while the Italian greyhound is a very sweet breed they do tend to be very 'fragile' so maybe not a great choice with small kids that may grab a leg) What about other pets? Another dog or a cat? Do you have family or friends with pets that you will welcome into the home? If you don't want any shedding, then you are better off with the curly coated dogs like poodles and water spaniel. Some breeds shed constantly while others tend to blow out their coats a couple of times a year but have minimal shedding between those events. IS that OK? Most breeds will be good with a family if socialized properly; however, some have a predisposition toward bonding to a single person. As you would expect, hunting breeds that work with other dogs tend to be more social than sight hounds but that is simply a tendency. If you toss out some breeds that interest you, I think you may be able to get some better thoughts.

    Thank you. Let me address some answers to you.

    Yes, large fenced in back yard, one half of an acre, but only a five foot fence and it can't be made higher due to fencing restrictions. I'd like the exercise to be primarily in the back yard.

    No family or friends with pets that come into the house and we have no other pets.

    Small child, our friends bring their children over frequently and they are multiple ages.

    The dog would be regularly groomed. Dogs that shed would be off the table as the dog would come to my office three days a week and hang out. The dog must not have aggressive tendencies or this feature would not work. One other dog is at my office a lot, a golden retriever (groomed every week) and she does fine but is a mature dog.

    #23 2 years ago
    Quoted from AlexF:

    Actually if you look up Whippets characteristics they fit the bill for what you want. I think it may be the same as an Italian Greyhound though?

    My understanding is a whippet is different from an Italian Greyhound in that it is the in the middle size between an Italian and full size greyhound. All greyhounds and sub sects of same are great dogs, no doubt.

    #24 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    Thank you for this and some of the other good responses. I appreciate it. I will research the Weimeraner and the brown dog that I see it is related to.

    I'm guessing you are referring to German Shorthair Pointers. I love GSP's, grew up with them. Great hunting dogs, great family dogs but really high energy. Love the breed and there are exceptions to every rule, but based on your criteria, I think there are better fits.

    #25 2 years ago
    Quoted from Oldgoat:

    I'm guessing you are referring to German Shorthair Pointers.

    I think she is referring to a vizla, which is a great animal but doesn't fit the criteria she is looking for either.

    As an aside, any animal that comes into our home is a super duper lucky dog. PavBall is asking these questions because she is looking for as good of a possible fit for us as she can, which is the responsible thing to do.

    My law partner brings her dog to the office, PavBall wants to do the same, which will be interesting. South Louisiana is a super (almost ridiculously) hot place, about half the dog breeds in existence would not be happy there in the climate, so that eliminates a lot of the larger calmer dog breeds from her criteria.

    Rescue dogs are wonderful, no doubt. People who adopt a pet are doing a great thing for the animal and themselves. Dogs are, however, slaves to their genetics in many ways and it is important to have a good fit - that is the most fair thing to the pet and the family.

    #26 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    Yes, large fenced in back yard, one half of an acre, but only a five foot fence and it can't be made higher due to fencing restrictions. I'd like the exercise to be primarily in the back yard.
    No family or friends with pets that come into the house and we have no other pets.
    Small child, our friends bring their children over frequently and they are multiple ages.
    The dog would be regularly groomed. Dogs that shed would be off the table as the dog would come to my office three days a week and hang out. The dog must not have aggressive tendencies or this feature would not work. One other dog is at my office a lot, a golden retriever (groomed every week) and she does fine but is a mature dog.

    Large fenced yard is great (in fact if you go the rescue route with a rescue organization as opposed to the local shelter, they will often require this for larger breeds). A five foot fence will be fine. Not that some dogs don't have the ability to easily clear it but with a bit of training, they will learn to respect it. Small child suggests either a sturdy small breed or a larger breed. And by larger I mean 40+ lbs, which encompasses lots of different breeds. If you really want zero shedding, then hairless or one of the poodle/poodle-like breeds may be your best bet. If some shedding is OK, the door opens to a lot more breeds. If you decide on a poodle, I beg of you, please do not go the froufrou route with grooming! Keep it natural! By the way, are you looking for a puppy or an older dog?

    -2
    #27 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    Just wow! I'm going to exercise the dog, but different dogs require different levels of exercise. If you think an English Bulldog would enjoy running and jogging with its owner every day as much as a boxer would you are flat kidding yourself.
    A pug does not require the same level of exercise as a Doberman. I Great Dane does not require the same level of exercise as a lab.
    Just because I'm looking for a low energy dog doesn't mean I should not have one.

    no reason to get in a huff. It is OK to own what you said and clarify that you are looking for a low energy dog rather than one that

    Quoted from PavBall:

    does not require lots of exercise

    What sort of mental and physical exercise are you comfortable in doing with a dog every day? Is throwing a ball in the back yard the extent of exercise you plan to do? It still sounds to me like you want a dog to fit into your life. I just think you should realize that good dog owners will quickly mould their life with the dog and are going to require more flexibility in their constraints.

    No matter what dog you get, it is always a shake of the dice with both genetics and behaviors. I would say it sounds like you definitely are looking for a more mature dog. I would seek out a 5+ year old pitbull/retriever mix of the shorter hair variety.

    Very few dogs dont shed, so if that is a strick criteria then you are limiting yourself to the poodle types. Many of the short hair dogs will still shed but it is manageable since it is less total hair. The non-shedding breeds tend to have behavioral traits you dont want.

    If you really want the majority of your exercise to be in the back yard then I still suggest not getting a dog or doing way more research than on Pinside. Like humans, dogs like variety and the greater variety of situations you can present the better adjusted your dog will become. Maybe consider fostering a dog for a bit as a test run. Maybe see if you can pet sit for a friend a few times. Sorry but the thing you type seem like you are very inexperienced with dogs? More experience will help you to better realize what you want and what are your real constraints or maybe somethings are less of a constraint.

    #28 2 years ago
    Quoted from Oldgoat:

    If you decide on a poodle, I beg of you, please do not go the froufrou route with grooming!

    Two of my favorite dogs I see every football season (they literally have not missed a home game in six years!).

    image_(resized).png

    #29 2 years ago
    Quoted from TigerLaw:

    As an aside, any animal that comes into our home is a super duper lucky dog. PavBall is asking these questions because she is looking for as good of a possible fit for us as she can, which is the responsible thing to do.

    Ding, Ding, Ding Right answer.

    Every year we tour the local shelter and it is heartbreaking to see all of the pets there. Most are there because owners did not do their homework. The criteria for picking the dog was simply 'ooh, isn't he cute' I appreciate and applaud your taking the time to make an informed decision.

    #30 2 years ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    Very few dogs dont shed, so if that is a strick criteria then you are limiting yourself to the poodle types. Many of the short hair dogs will still shed but it is manageable since it is less total hair. The non-shedding breeds tend to have behavioral traits you dont want.

    I agree with this 100%. Add to that the weather in Louisiana mandates many breeds not be considered at all.

    Quoted from Whysnow:

    No matter what dog you get, it is always a shale of the dice with both genetics and behaviors. I would say it sounds like you definitely are looking for a more mature dog. I would seek out a 5+ year old pitbull/retriever mix of the shorter hair variety.

    I agree with this as well but she's concerned the pitbull mixes might be dangerous or unpredictable, I disagree with that but recognize they have that reputation so I'm not trying to dissuade her from the view.

    #31 2 years ago
    Quoted from TigerLaw:

    pitbull mixes might be dangerous or unpredictable

    the breed having that wrap is BS. I have extensive time with over 100 different pits/pit mixes. The majority are amazing and loving dogs. I have known more goldens which have bitten people than pitbulls.

    Pit/retriever mixes are honestly the closest fit to your criteria of all dogs I can think of. They are extremely loyal, very smart (trainable) yet content to chase a ball everyday tell exhasuted, and tend to be "flip a switch" dogs. Exercise them hard in the morning and they are content to just chill the rest of the day.

    Again, they are very athletic dogs so getting one that is 5 years old will be better it sounds. The obvious constraint, is where have they been for those previous 5 years and what training have they had...

    #32 2 years ago

    I have 2 miniature schnauzers. The only require 15-20 min of exercise a day. The rest of the time they nap. We call them schnoozers, although they have terrier in them and are always ready to play. Kinda small but there are medium sized and giant schnauzers too. They don't shed, so you have to cut their hair. Also non allergenic; a must for my wife.

    The best advice I can give is do an online survey. I think we took one from the purina dog food web site. They're filled with questions like, size of house/apartment, amount of activity you prefer, how intelligent of a dog you want, how independent/follower do you want your dog to be, if you want a working dog or lap dog, ect. They'll give you the top 10 breeds that fit your criteria.

    #33 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    Where did the idea come from that I don't want to play with the dog? That's a big jump from my asking about low energy dogs.

    I never said that. Since your husband is a lawyer, let's review the transcript. Here's what you said:

    Quoted from PavBall:

    I'm looking for a dog breed that is good in families, does not require lots of exercise,

    Here's what I said:

    Quoted from beelzeboob:

    Dogs need exercise, and it's not fair to the dog to have an owner that doesn't want to commit at least an hour a day to walk the dog or throw the ball with them.

    Now, at what point in that sentence did I say that YOU wouldn't walk the dog or throw a ball with them? I made a general statement that all dogs need to be exercised and they require a time commitment. That's all. It was like saying that it would be unfair to a pinball machine to expect that you buy one and never have to do maintenance on it.

    I even wished you good luck in your search, so clearly my post was well-intentioned. I can't believe my words were misconstrued, and I'm sorry I tried to help.

    #34 2 years ago
    Quoted from beelzeboob:

    Dogs need exercise, and it's not fair to the dog to have an owner that doesn't want to commit at least an hour a day to walk the dog or throw the ball with them.

    Not all dogs need an hour of activity per day and some breeds need much more than one hour. Just research the breeds your considering and find a match for you.

    #35 2 years ago
    Quoted from Luckydogg420:

    The best advice I can give is do an online survey. I think we took one from the purina dog food web site.

    Thank you Thank you!! What a great survey, I just took it...

    Answers that are right for me are mostly all in the terrier and schnauzer family. The Portugese Water Dog and Italian Greyhound also came up. I had 19 matches from the questions.

    #36 2 years ago
    Quoted from Luckydogg420:

    Not all dogs need an hour of activity per day and some breeds need much more than one hour. Just research the breeds your considering and find a match for you.

    Correct. But on average--between feeding the dog, walking the dog, etc.--it takes about an hour out of my day. But that's just me...

    #37 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    Thank you Thank you!! What a great survey, I just took it...
    Answers that are right for me are mostly all in the terrier and schnauzer family. The Portugese Water Dog and Italian Greyhound also came up. I had 19 matches from the questions.

    That's a lot to choose from, you should find the perfect match easily. Our top match was some funny looking dog that we would just make fun of, so we settled for the 3rd or 4th on the list and couldn't be more happy.

    #38 2 years ago

    You are absolutely going about getting a dog the responsible way. Researching, asking questions etc.. What ever kind you decide on, life is much better with a dog.

    #39 2 years ago
    Quoted from Jaybird815:

    You are absolutely going about getting a dog the responsible way. Researching, asking questions etc.. What ever kind you decide on, life is much better with a dog.

    agreed! Glad the questions are being asked. Pav- go out and hang at a shelter for a day and play with the dogs. Spend the whole day and watch to see how some of the different breeds act throughout the whole day. Go with the plan of just watching and NOT picking.

    #40 2 years ago

    Support your local shelter. Go weekly untill you find your new friend. Most shelters allow you to walk and play with the dogs. I'd personally never support someone selling a dog for profit.
    Border collies, labradors and retrievers are excellent family pets if you want a medium to large size dog.

    "Help control the pet population. Have your pet spayed or neutered" Bob Barker.

    #41 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    Thank you for this and some of the other good responses. I appreciate it. I will research the Weimeraner and the brown dog that I see it is related to.

    Don't go with a Weimeraner. They need to run more than any human can do for them. I have a neighbor that had a Weimeraner and he would get on his bike with a leash, but I always felt that seemed unsafe for the dog and still did not seem to be enough exercise for the dog. That type of dog can also be hostile to small dogs. My neighbor's dog almost killed another neighbor's shih tzu mix.

    #42 2 years ago

    Shih Tzus don't shed and don't require lots of exercise i.e. 1 hr walks

    #43 2 years ago
    Quoted from DCFAN:

    Don't go with a Weimeraner. They need to run more than any human can do for them. I have a neighbor that had a Weimeraner and he would get on his bike with a leash, but I always felt that seemed unsafe for the dog and still did not seem to be enough exercise for the dog. That type of dog can also be hostile to small dogs. My neighbor's dog almost killed another neighbor's shih tzu mix.

    Like any breed, it's all in the training. Mine was around dogs and people from day one and is an absolute favorite among the workers at the non kill shelter we drop her off at for the day, weekly. She'll lay on her back to play with the smaller dogs. They are known for the great temperament with small children and other dogs. Your neighbors sounds like it had some issues. Here's ours with a shih tzu

    image_(resized).jpeg

    #44 2 years ago
    Quoted from Jaybird815:

    Like any breed, it's all in the training. Mine was around dogs and people from day one and is an absolute favorite among the workers at the non kill shelter we drop her off at for the day, weekly. She'll lay on her back to play with the smaller dogs. They are known for the great temperament with small children and other dogs. Your neighbors sounds like it had some issues.

    They are a territorial animal by nature. Owning your dog with a shih tzu is not the same as having a strange dog come near your property. My neighbor with the weimeraner also has a cat that was not harmed.

    http://www.streetdirectory.com/travel_guide/194375/pets/when_your_weimaraner_is_aggressive.html

    What about the exercise issue? She wants a dog that does not need a ton of exercise. They really need a lot of land to run.

    #45 2 years ago

    They are definitely a higher energy dog, mine is a freak about the frisbee so she gets about 30-60 minutes of running a day in our yard

    #46 2 years ago
    Quoted from PavBall:

    Thank you Thank you!! What a great survey, I just took it...
    Answers that are right for me are mostly all in the terrier and schnauzer family. The Portugese Water Dog and Italian Greyhound also came up. I had 19 matches from the questions.

    Just as an update, we are now taking a bunch of these different surveys and reading through the results closely. There is a lot of data out there and we are planning to take our time with this ten plus year decision. We did not know surveys like this were available online and they are all very informative.

    PavBall came to this group for the questions because we spend so much time on Pinside and know so many of you through here and the shows and what not.

    I'm also surprised how good of a match the surveys feel we are with schnauzers, basically any type of schnauzer or sub sec of same seems to fit us well.

    I am an experienced dog owner but this decision is ultimately PavBall's so I want her to find the perfect little friend for us.

    #47 2 years ago

    So, many great dog breeds. I would have never thought about a French Bulldog or a Boxer. I've met a few, very cool. Check them out.

    #48 2 years ago

    Also, BE SURE to check out Boston Terriers. The good genetic bat ear (not the crappy genetic bug eye). Bostons are VERY different from other terriers.

    They may fit perfectly what you are looking for (aside from wanting a larger breed)

    #49 2 years ago

    Here is another recommendation since it appears that you are leaning toward purebred dogs. (I'm not going down the rabbit hole of mutt vs purebred, rescue vs shelter vs breeder.) Therefore, the following advice is based on my assumption of looking for specific breeds.

    Go on-line to the breed club and read what it says. Typically, they will be extremely blunt on why NOT to get the breed and what the optimal owner and environment for the breed is. They will stress behavioral and health tendencies, good and bad. Then call some breeders who are active in the breed club. Be forewarned that this will not be a five minute conversation. Figure minmum of 30 minutes, count on an hour. They will ask you 20 questions about what you are looking for and the situation. They do not want their dogs placed in an environment that won't work out.

    The problem with forums, like this, is that most people base their opinion of a breed on very limited sample size. Hence why you see one person say a Weimaraner is great and another says they are crazy. (In reality, no bird dog should be predisposed to go after fur over feather and all should have an extremely soft mouth if they do catch something. That is how they are bred. True story, had a Spinone once. My wife and I were in the back yard and Wilson saw a large butterfly on a flower. We both saw him reach out and completely 'swallow it'. We both yelled "Wilson!" He immediately opened his mouth and the butterfly flew out completely unharmed. There is no point in having a bird dog that chomps what it retrieves).

    Anyhow, find some breeds that interest you and talk to some reputable breeders. (You may be surprised at how many will try to talk you out of the breed)

    #50 2 years ago
    Quoted from Oldgoat:

    Anyhow, find some breeds that interest you and talk to some reputable breeders. (You may be surprised at how many will try to talk you out of the breed)

    I've owned a lot of dogs. From shih-tzu and poodles to akbash and Rottweilers. It's very true that a good breeder won't want their pup going to a home that doesn't suit it well. Also the breed of the dog is less important then the temperament and training; any breed can be kind or crazy.

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