(Topic ID: 225428)

Do you have a table saw?


By cottonm4

9 months ago



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    There are 102 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 3.
    #1 9 months ago

    This is not a discussion about a table saw vs. a band saw. This about those who have a table saw and like what you can do with it.

    I recently bought my first table saw. It is a pawn shop special. An older model portable Mikita. I am having a blast with it and find myself thinking that I should have bought one years ago. But when I bought it I was very ignorant about what to look for.

    What I do like about it is that it is lightweight and easy to move around in my work area. What I don't like is that it has no safety features---I have become aware of kickback. There is no blade guard and no riving blade and the fence leaves a lot to be desired. So, I am starting to look around for something newer and better. With "better" meaning up to date on safety features , a more accurate fence, an easier and more robust way to adjust blade angle, and some way to collect all of the saw dust that is generated.

    I like the safety features on the Saw Stop but it is up there on price.

    What kind of table saw do you have? What do you like about it? What do you not like about it?

    #2 9 months ago

    I don't own one but I do have all 10 fingers.

    #3 9 months ago

    Have a small 9 in craftsman table saw. No safety whatsoever. Like my shop teacher used to say, the most important safety is the one between your ears. Think before you cut, be aware and be ready. That said crap happens. Table saws definitely have their place. I cut down sheets of Mdf, cheaper to buy a full sheet and cut what you need and have leftovers than to buy the smaller sheets.

    #4 9 months ago

    We have a powermatic 3000 wired to 3 phase.

    #5 9 months ago

    I’ve had many over the years. I find the guard and kickback fingers get in the way of your cuts. If you are tight to the fence, it won’t kick back. Just make sure you have a push stick handy for small cuts. I currently have a 10” Bosch

    #6 9 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    What kind of table saw do you have? What do you like about it? What do you not like about it?

    Are you looking for a small, portable one or a larger, full sized one? I don't own one but I have access to one at a cabinet shop. It has a table built around it such that I can easily cut 4 x 8 sheets of anything.

    #7 9 months ago

    Delta Unisaw with Biesemeyer fence. Portable table saws are an accident waiting to happen.
    Shop estate sales if u don't want to spend for new.

    #8 9 months ago

    Delta 10” belt driven contractor saw, I guess it’s about 20+ years old now. I don’t use the blade guard or riving knife, blocks the view.

    #9 9 months ago

    Yes. Rockwell contractor 10" saw that's probably from the mid 70s. Guide and table extensions for cutting paneling which I don't use very often.

    #10 9 months ago

    Nope. A router suits my needs.

    #11 9 months ago

    Two. And in response to buzz yeah, one finger has a 45 angled tip.

    #12 9 months ago

    I have a very small Craftsman that sounds every bit as dangerous as your Mikata. If I was going to buy new, I'd look at the Rigid and DeWalt portable contractor models if a full sized table doesn't meet your needs.

    #13 9 months ago

    Old restored Craftsman 113 with cast extension wings, delta T3 fence and zero clearance insert with micro jig splitter. Works phenomenal. Fence was more than the saw.

    #14 9 months ago

    here's radial saw built like a tank in the 1940's , solid with no plastic anywhere

    DSC09127 (resized).JPGDSC09128 (resized).JPGDSC09129 (resized).JPGDSC09130 (resized).JPGDSC09131 (resized).JPGDSC09132 (resized).JPG

    #15 9 months ago

    Dewalt contractors, has reasonable safety features (removed some on mine) but very dependable and not the lightest but not bad either. I have an extended table that came with it that works well with full sheets with minimal fuss.

    #16 9 months ago

    I just inherited a Powermatic table saw with fences and other accessories, haven’t used it yet but seems high quality.

    My dad has a vintage radial arm saw similar to the dewalt contractor pictured above. It’s mounted to a trailer to use at construction sites, and has an 18” blade. That thing is super loud like a jet and would scare the heck out of me when I was a kid.

    #17 9 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    This is not a discussion about a table saw vs. a band saw. This about those who have a table saw and like what you can do with it.
    I recently bought my first table saw. It is a pawn shop special. An older model portable Mikita. I am having a blast with it and find myself thinking that I should have bought one years ago. But when I bought it I was very ignorant about what to look for.
    What I do like about it is that it is lightweight and easy to move around in my work area. What I don't like is that it has no safety features---I have become aware of kickback. There is no blade guard and no riving blade and the fence leaves a lot to be desired. So, I am starting to look around for something newer and better. With "better" meaning up to date on safety features , a more accurate fence, an easier and more robust way to adjust blade angle, and some way to collect all of the saw dust that is generated.
    I like the safety features on the Saw Stop but it is up there on price.
    What kind of table saw do you have? What do you like about it? What do you not like about it?

    My thoughts - I have a table saw and I think it is the most versatile saw a woodworker can have. You can make TONS of cuts with a table saw! Saw Stop is amazing but very pricey. I removed the safety guards on my table saw because I think it blocks the view and don't like not being able to see where the material (and my fingers) are during the cut. Here is what I do to ensure safety:

    - safety glasses ALWAYS
    - visualize the cut before doing it
    - make sure the blade is sharp
    - make sure the material will slide smooth and tight to the fence
    - utilize the push sticks well

    The other thing I use is the "GRR-RIPPER" from MicroJig, which eliminates kickback when used with a push stick. Link: https://www.microjig.com/products/grr-ripper

    I bought the GRR-RIPPER after getting a softball sized bruise on my stomach from a violent kickback. (It was worth it though, the hutch looked great!)

    Screen Shot 2018-09-16 at 7.03.31 PM (resized).png
    #18 9 months ago

    I use nothing but "vintage" woodworking equipment - everything newer than the early 1960's is pretty much "junk" in my eyes. My table saw is from the 1950's and I can cut toothpicks on it. 100% true on every cut - and seriously I can make 8 or 10' long cuts (cutting a 32nd of an inch off a board) and once done I don't even need to use my joiner to finish my cuts. Best part is I paid like $50 for it 20 years ago at an auction.

    As far as "safety features" on modern tools they are fine but typically they are in the way more than they help. Work safe and use your head and you don't need safety features offered on newer tools. I have been working around automotive tools and woodworking tools for over 50 years and the only time I ever got hurt is back in my younger "long hair" days when my ponytail got wrapped up in creeper wheel a couple of times. After the second time with that I decided it was time for short hair!

    As far as handheld tools nothing but Dewalt cordless for me. I have about 30 using their 18 volt batteries and love every one of them. I have toyed with the idea of changing over to 20 volt platform but all my 18 volt stuff fits like a glove so I have decided against that for now.

    #19 9 months ago

    There are only a few basic principles when operating a table saw

    #20 9 months ago
    Quoted from too-many-pins:

    I use nothing but "vintage" woodworking equipment - everything newer than the early 1960's is pretty much "junk" in my eyes. My table saw is from the 1950's and I can cut toothpicks on it. 100% true on every cut - and seriously I can make 8 or 10' long cuts (cutting a 32nd of an inch off a board) and once done I don't even need to use my joiner to finish my cuts. Best part is I paid like $50 for it 20 years ago at an auction.
    As far as "safety features" on modern tools they are fine but typically they are in the way more than they help. Work safe and use your head and you don't need safety features offered on newer tools. I have been working around automotive tools and woodworking tools for over 50 years and the only time I ever got hurt is back in my younger "long hair" days when my ponytail got wrapped up in creeper wheel a couple of times. After the second time with that I decided it was time for short hair!
    As far as handheld tools nothing but Dewalt cordless for me. I have about 30 using their 18 volt batteries and love every one of them. I have toyed with the idea of changing over to 20 volt platform but all my 18 volt stuff fits like a glove so I have decided against that for now.

    Dewalt handheld is not what it used to be. Porter cable seems pretty good, but Milwaukee tools I find are pretty good quality.

    The delta unisaw is the king followed by a powermatic 66. Their fences and stability are really nice, you can balance a nickel on them starting it up.

    I’ve got some nice other tools, powermatic Mortiser, delta 6” jointer, jet band saw, jet dc1200 dust collector, delta drill press and a lot of hand held power tools. Pinball has taken over my woodworking hobby. I am looking to sell my dust collector, jointer and mortiser.

    #21 9 months ago

    Makita cordless are the best!

    #22 9 months ago

    The Rockwell/Porter-Cable years were pretty good. After Rockwell sold them off, The Delta/Porter-Cable stuff remained good. Not always the best, but good.

    #23 9 months ago
    Quoted from romulusx:

    Makita cordless are the best!

    I swore by Mikita for years then moved over to 18 volt Dewalt about 20 years ago and never looked back. I have only had a couple issues with my Dewalt tools and our local service center went above & beyond every time to take care of me. A few years back I went in with an issue with one of my 2 gallon 18 volt vacs that was like 4 year old. Told them we were headed out of town in a couple weeks and would like to have it to take on our trip because we used it exclusively for our RV. Guy behind the counter brings me out a new in box replacement and says "enjoy your trip". 3 years out beyond warranty & service like that sold me on Dewalt.

    I don't think any of the "newer" cordless stuff is near as good as the older stuff so that was one of my reasons for not changing over to 20 volt platform a couple years back. I can't imagine what that change over would cost me anyway with 30+ tools using their 18 volt platform in my collection. We do have a couple 20 volt tools and I really don't like them any better anyway.

    #24 9 months ago

    I use a Porter Cable. It's a 10" model on wheels sold at Lowes or Home Depot. The fence is the weak point. There's a bit of play so I have to use a square when clamping it down.

    Otherwise works pretty well but I get kickback. Cut depth doesn't seem to matter so probably need a better blade. It always makes me jump but it has taught me to be very aware of where my bodily parts are before starting the cut!

    #25 9 months ago
    Quoted from luch:

    here's one built like a tank in the 1940's , solid with no plastic anywhere
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image][quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

    Dude that’s great but its a Radal arm saw.

    #26 9 months ago

    It sounds like I have the same one as Lermods.

    Blade guards aren't a 100% guarantee of safety. My Dad actually cut his thumb on his saw because of the guard. (Well, technically it was his own fault because his fingers shouldn't have been that close) The board he was ripping got hung up on the guard. He tried to clear it with his thumb and in doing so somehow hit the blade.

    Bottom line, safety is the responsibility of the operator. Before using a table saw be sure you know how it works and how to operate it safely. Your local library will likely have books on table saws and their usage. It only takes 1 mistake to have a pretty severe accident.

    #27 9 months ago
    Quoted from Erik:

    I use a Porter Cable. It's a 10" model on wheels sold at Lowes or Home Depot. The fence is the weak point. There's a bit of play so I have to use a square when clamping it down.
    Otherwise works pretty well but I get kickback. Cut depth doesn't seem to matter so probably need a better blade. It always makes me jump but it has taught me to be very aware of where my bodily parts are before starting the cut!

    Self quote!

    Also needed to add, a buddy of mine has a Bosch with pneumatic tires (mine are hard rubber), and his has a much better fence. Maybe 10 years old tho, so not sure if things are different now.

    #28 9 months ago

    Can we digress and talk about chop saws? Have a 12" dewalt and have no real complaints. Want more capacity so thinking of going to sliding compound. The Bosch with the folding srm looks nice and doesn't need space bedhind it like others. Also looks like you can make custom zero cleance inserts. Anyone have that one?

    #29 9 months ago
    Quoted from Skypilot:

    Dude that’s great but its a Radal arm saw.

    yes I stand corrected

    #30 9 months ago

    I've had portable table saws and a radial arm saw. In the end I set up several tables/saw horses and do all my cuts with a 7 1/4" circular saw, a jigsaw and a router. Some day when my shop is bigger than my current setup I'll probably get an old full-size table saw but for now, this is the safest option for me. I can manipulate a circular saw much easier than a 4X8 sheet of plywood.

    Shawn

    #31 9 months ago

    I'm not afraid of the blade. I use pusher sticks, etc. So I would probably remove the blade guard, but I do like that riving blade. I am going to be making myself a sled in a the next couple of weeks.

    My work space is not huge so a portable saw it has to be. I like these rack and pinion fences I am learning about. And I want a more robust way of changing the blade angle than throwing a lever and having to fight the weight of the blade assembly that takes 3 hands to make square.

    And a dust collection port.

    #32 9 months ago
    Quoted from Langless28:

    Can we digress and talk about chop saws? Have a 12" dewalt and have no real complaints. Want more capacity so thinking of going to sliding compound. The Bosch with the folding srm looks nice and doesn't need space bedhind it like others. Also looks like you can make custom zero cleance inserts. Anyone have that one?

    I've had a Hitachi 10" sliding compound saw for 20 years, works fantastic. It's a workhorse for sure.

    #33 9 months ago

    Bosch 4100 10" saw on a gravity rise stand. excellent small saw and the stand allows it to be easily moved while being incredibly stable. Plus you can store it folded vertically for a smaller footprint.

    #34 9 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    I'm not afraid of the blade.

    A healthy fear of the table saw blade isn't a bad thing to have.

    I have a Rigid jobsite table saw that I absolutely love.

    #35 9 months ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    A healthy fear of the table saw blade isn't a bad thing to have.
    I have a Rigid jobsite table saw that I absolutely love.

    I understand what you are saying, for sure.

    I respect the blade and what it will do and what it can do. I'm just not afraid of it like I thought I would be.

    #36 9 months ago
    Quoted from Jjsmooth:

    Delta Unisaw with Biesemeyer fence. Portable table saws are an accident waiting to happen.
    Shop estate sales if u don't want to spend for new.

    Why do you say portable saws are accidents waiting to happen? What's wrong with them, in your opinion?

    #37 9 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    Why do you say portable saws are accidents waiting to happen? What's wrong with them, in your opinion?

    True. I’ve been using a portable for 20 years with my job.. still have all my digits

    #38 9 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    Why do you say portable saws are accidents waiting to happen? What's wrong with them, in your opinion?

    Likely due to the small tabletop. People will still try to breakdown sheet goods on a portable. it works just fine if you use correct auxiliary support but if you don't support the sheet well it will flex which will lead to binding, and a high chance of kickback. A half sheet is easily manageable solo on a portable, but anything larger needs support and better yet support and a second person.

    There's nothing wrong with portables.

    #40 9 months ago

    Saw stop is nice. Expensive, and you need to replace the sensor after it hits what It thinks is flesh

    #41 9 months ago
    Quoted from Spinape:

    Saw stop is nice. Expensive, and you need to replace the sensor after it hits what It thinks is flesh

    They also tend to be over sensitive (not necessarily a bad thing when its a false positive, rather than being conservative and chewing a finger) with wet woods. Too wet of a piece can fool it into going off.
    But if you are concerned about that you can bypass the sensor temporarily and cut in "normal saw mode" w/o the safety.

    #42 9 months ago
    Quoted from pin2d:

    The other thing I use is the "GRR-RIPPER" from MicroJig, which eliminates kickback when used with a push stick.

    Seconded. I have a pair of GRRRIPPERs and love them. Microjig makes some good stuff.

    #43 9 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    Why do you say portable saws are accidents waiting to happen? What's wrong with them, in your opinion?

    They’re not too bad as long as you have one that is stable and has some weight to it.

    There are some small model table saws that are literally a spinning death blade in a plastic box (such as Ryobi). Don’t use those ever. They can easily catch the work piece and leap into the air.

    I have this guy...

    1303E39C-71BD-4F46-9E8D-4C4B534312E4.jpeg

    It’s great for a contractor saw. I only use it for smaller cuts though, since I have a Festool tracksaw for the big stuff.

    #44 9 months ago
    Quoted from Marvin:

    They also tend to be over sensitive (not necessarily a bad thing when its a false positive, rather than being conservative and chewing a finger) with wet woods. Too wet of a piece can fool it into going off.
    But if you are concerned about that you can bypass the sensor temporarily and cut in "normal saw mode" w/o the safety.

    1. no one on Pinside cuts wet wood, lol.

    (if they are building a deck, or some other "wet wood" project, they are using a chop saw, not a $$$$ cabinet saw)

    2 the SawStop has a built in "wet wood" detector.

    If you put a piece of wet wood on the table, and slide it up to the non-spinning blade, the lights flash to inform you the wood is wet.

    3. You just turn the key if you need to cut conductive stock.

    I cut 1/2" and 1" aluminum plate all the time on my Sawstop. The Sawstop reminds you that the material is conductive.

    4. In the decade that I've owned the Sawstop (it replaced my Powermatic), I've NEVER ONCE TRIPPED THE SAFETY MECH.

    It came with a spare mech, and I've never used it.

    #45 9 months ago

    Never use a table saw that does not have a riving knife installed.

    If the stock touches the back of the blade, your hand (or face) is history.

    You can get an aftermarket riving knife for just about any quality saw - use it!

    #46 9 months ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Never use a table saw that does not have a riving knife installed.
    If the stock touches the back of the blade, your hand (or face) is history.
    You can get an aftermarket riving knife for just about any quality saw - use it!

    Agreed. I take the guard off but not the riving knife. They are actually a pain to get off in most models I’ve used... so like you said, don’t

    #47 9 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    I like the safety features on the Saw Stop but it is up there on price.

    Just get the Sawstop and forget the price.

    It's only $300 more than a Powermatic, and it heavier, smoother running and obviously safer.

    Even if you only have a 20% co-pay on your insurance, EACH finger is $60,000 to reattach.

    So you could buy 4 Sawstops for the co-pay for just one finger (let alone if you cut off a few).

    Don't pay internet list price for the Sawstop.

    Go to your local power tool store and save a ton by paying cash.

    They will also throw in a bunch of extras, so it's super worth it.

    #48 9 months ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Never use a table saw that does not have a riving knife installed.
    If the stock touches the back of the blade, your hand (or face) is history.
    You can get an aftermarket riving knife for just about any quality saw - use it!

    I made this mistake once. It makes you a quick learner.

    #49 9 months ago
    Quoted from pin2d:

    I made this mistake once. It makes you a quick learner.

    Yeah, "I'm super careful" but I once had a 2x4 kick back instantly - it simply was gone from the shop.

    I looked at my fingers (yep, still there), I looked around the shop (wood was gone).

    Turns out it shot through the metal garage door and was laying out on the driveway.

    I went to the power tool store and bought a riving knife kit the next day. Guys at the store were incredulous "You have a table without a knife? Are you crazy????"

    "It came with a bunch of other guards but no knife" I said sheepishly....at least I gave them a story to tell.

    #50 9 months ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Yeah, "I'm super careful" but I once had a 2x4 kick back instantly - it simply was gone from the shop.
    I looked at my fingers (yep, still there), I looked around the shop (wood was gone).
    Turns out it shot through the metal garage door and was laying out on the driveway.
    I went to the power tool store and bought a riving knife kit the next day. Guys at the store were incredulous "You have a table without a knife? Are you crazy????"
    "It came with a bunch of other guards but no knife" I said sheepishly....at least I gave them a story to tell.

    Yes, kickback can be deadly. They demonstrated kickback at our school. Knocked a chunk out of the brick wall.

    With that being said, a portable doesn’t have the same amperage as shop saws. Not as harsh if you do get kickback. I know you recommend the saw stop, but for hobby is it really worth dropping that kind of cash?

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