(Topic ID: 230142)

Do you do your own welding?


By HighVoltage

4 months ago



Topic Stats

  • 67 posts
  • 31 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 77 days ago by MrBally
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 19 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    20190201_235546 (resized).png
    IMG_2978 (resized).PNG
    257B0F48-A43A-4B09-A5A1-1A7E867715A8 (resized).jpeg
    scoop-fix3 (resized).jpg
    FH-scoop (resized).jpg
    scoop-fix1 (resized).jpg
    Millermatic-Mig-Welder-W (resized).jpg
    Camry4 (resized).jpg
    Camry3 (resized).jpg
    Camry2 (resized).jpg
    Camry (resized).jpg
    PHOTO-2017-11-16-13-31-21 (resized).jpg
    PHOTO-2017-12-24-19-12-22 (2) (resized).jpg
    PHOTO-2017-12-24-19-12-22 (resized).jpg
    IMG_0255 (resized).jpg
    64CA27E2-3E26-40D8-89FF-47381FAB639A (resized).jpeg

    There are 67 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 4 months ago

    I have the typical scoop tab that broke and needs to be repaired. I was wondering what kind of welder I would need to do this myself. Will a cheap TIG welder do? It seems Forney makes some pretty inexpensive models. Would I need a torch or just use a rod? No, I don't know a lot about welding, but I figure I can practice a bit, and just fixing a tab shouldn't be too difficult.

    These kind of little weld requirements come up enough that I'd rather do it myself than find someone to do them.

    I did a search but only found people out-sourcing this, which surprised me since there's so many DIYers here. Maybe it's more difficult than I imagine.

    #2 4 months ago

    Picture of the broken item would help.

    #3 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    Maybe it's more difficult than I imagine.

    Small stuff is more difficult than larger items. So easy to burn holes right through the work.
    Pinhead want everything to be pretty. More expensive equipment yields better results.

    #4 4 months ago

    Seems like most pinball repairs could be done with a TIG welder. I do my repairs with a MIG and it does good if I turn the settings down.

    #5 4 months ago

    I usually go to my local welder if it is something like a scope or ramp.
    I pay them with a case of beer or a cake or something.
    They love to see me coming !
    Always perfect results and happy faces !

    #6 4 months ago

    Dont forget, its not just the tig machine . you’ll need inert gas also, a quality mask .. and practice.

    But having a good quality tig welder in your tool selection will give you years of pleasure, for all sorts of household jobs too

    #7 4 months ago
    Quoted from MrBally:

    Small stuff is more difficult than larger items. So easy to burn holes right through the work.
    Pinhead want everything to be pretty. More expensive equipment yields better results.

    Hence my desire to see a picture of an item.

    Thin stuff is real tough to do. Usually you end up with a large weld that you end up grinding off 75% of the weld to get to the finished product.

    TIG is better than MIG, but TIG you have to spend considerably more for quality equipment than MIG or you are wasting your time even trying TIG. TIG also demands some practice for those perfect pretty welds, takes longer to master.

    Been welding with MIG (Aluminum and steel) for 35 years now, it is pretty easy to pick up with a half way decent welder. I have a Lincoln 110V unit I do most of my steel work with and for what I do works fine.

    FYI once you learn welding not only will you be able to fix stuff that normally might get tossed out you have the ability to make tools to make jobs easier, fabricate almost anything you can think of in steel or aluminum and make some tidy money repairing stuff for other people. I'm constantly repairing hospital beds and get paid $75 for 5-10 minutes work.

    #8 4 months ago
    Quoted from gdonovan:

    TIG is better than MIG, but TIG you have to spend considerably more for quality equipment than MIG or you are wasting your time even trying TIG. TIG also demands some practice for those perfect pretty welds, takes longer to master.

    The Navy sent me to heliarc/TIG school to learn the skill. 3 weeks of welding stainless test panels followed by 3 weeks of welding aluminum test panels. I got pretty good at school but back at duty station the need and opportunity for me to keep welding was pushed to the side. Within 60 days I could barely strike a bead.

    Your hospital bed gig makes me sorry I let the skill go.

    #9 4 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    The Navy sent me to heliarc/TIG school to learn the skill. 3 weeks of welding stainless test panels followed by 3 weeks of welding aluminum test panels. I got pretty good at school but back at duty station the need and opportunity for me to keep welding was pushed to the side. Within 60 days I could barely strike a bead.
    Your hospital bed gig makes me sorry I let the skill go.

    I run a physical plant department at a nursing facility, the welding repairs are always a welcome extra source of cash for my hobbies. 2 months ago I repaired a bed with a broken deck which normally would have been replaced and saved the facility $1800.

    Overweight clientele can wreak havoc on the equipment should they feel cranky.

    Beds and dietary equipment make up the bulk of my welding repairs, my boss is appreciative as it saves a considerable amount of money compared to replacing the broken items.

    Bed rail replacement runs $300-$400 a pop, $75 is a bargain and stronger than new when I'm done.

    #10 4 months ago

    Here is the picture of the broken tab on the scoop. No one has addressed the rod vs torch. I didn't know about requiring inert gas, but that's only if a torch is needed, right?

    The other thought I had is, even if you bring it to pros some people have posted some pretty ugly results anyways. I guess the trick is to find a shop experienced with lower-gauge stainless? If I'm going to pay for it, I want it to look good. If I can do it myself, I can live with ugly work.

    Also, any opinions on how brazing with torch would handle this?

    FH-scoop (resized).jpg

    #11 4 months ago

    ^ That's a perfect job for a TIG

    Any local welding shop will fix that for $15, and it will be stronger than it was when it was new.

    #12 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    Here is the picture of the broken tab on the scoop. No one has addressed the rod vs torch. I didn't know about requiring inert gas, but that's only if a torch is needed, right?
    The other thought I had is, even if you bring it to pros some people have posted some pretty ugly results anyways. I guess the trick is to find a shop experienced with lower-gauge stainless? If I'm going to pay for it, I want it to look good. If I can do it myself, I can live with ugly work.
    Also, any opinions on how brazing with torch would handle this?
    [quoted image]

    That would be a snap to repair with either TIG or MIG.

    Quick tap with the gun, 5-10 seconds on a belt sander and you would not even know it was broken.

    #13 4 months ago

    Any local bodyshop can do that. Give the guy $20 and it's done.

    #14 4 months ago

    Yes, my initial search already showed everyone outsources jobs like this. But I'm still hoping on a recommendation for lower-end equipment that I can use to do this myself. Anyone?

    Are people recommending outsourcing because you can't do this with inexpensive equipment?

    Tomorrow there'll probably be general discounts on places like EBay, and I can get a cheap TIG set up. Can someone advise if rod is all I need? If torch/inert gas set up is required, I'll give up on the DIY route for now.

    #15 4 months ago

    My dad does them for our games because he owns a machine and fabrication shop.

    #16 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    Can someone advise if rod is all I need? If torch/inert gas set up is required, I'll give up on the DIY route for now.

    You need the machine, rods, gas cylinder, cleaning brushes (TIG has to be crazy clean), angle grinder, 220v outlet, gloves & apron, 100% cotton hoodie & pants, auto-darkening helmet, and some scrap material of similar thickness to practice on.

    While I certainly encourage you to learn to weld, it's not something you just casually do.

    I'd expect you would need about 4 nights of practice before you could weld that thin stainless nicely.

    #17 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    Tomorrow there'll probably be general discounts on places like EBay, and I can get a cheap TIG set up.

    Just don't.

    You will end up frustrated trying to use a cheap welder, when it comes to TIG you go big or go home. Buying a cheap TIG is not the way to go, a $500 110V MIG will however produce reasonable results for that thickness metal.

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/Lincoln-Electric-120-Volt-140-Amp-Mig-Flux-cored-Wire-Feed-Welder/1072945

    Here is a fine little rig for MIG welding, pickup an Argon/CD tank from a local shop and start practicing. Take the flux wire and toss it out or throw it in the toolbox for an emergency. Don't be tempted to weld something nice with flux core, it is a splattery mess only fit for exhaust work IMHO.

    #18 4 months ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    You need the machine, rods, gas cylinder, cleaning brushes (TIG has to be crazy clean), angle grinder, 220v outlet, gloves & apron, 100% cotton hoodie & pants, auto-darkening helmet, and some scrap material of similar thickness to practice on.
    While I certainly encourage you to learn to weld, it's not something you just casually do.
    I'd expect you would need about 4 nights of practice before you could weld that thin stainless nicely.

    With TIG a dedicated clean area is not out of the question, its that sensitive.

    #19 4 months ago

    I primarily stick weld, and actually would be lost without one of them and a cut off saw,
    but mig is the hot set up these days. Once the feed speed and heat are adjusted, it wouldn't
    take a whole lot of time to get the hang of it. I believe now, there are very good 110V migs that
    will penetrate even the thicker metals..
    I'd maybe for now have a machine shop do that quick repair, but also maybe keep an eye out
    on a decent deal for a decent mig. They are all so handy..
    I actually have arc welded thin metal pieces as such, but my guess would be that's not highly
    recommended..

    #20 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    Here is the picture of the broken tab on the scoop

    Is that from a TZ? If so, mantis amusements makes new ones with stronger welds.

    #21 4 months ago
    Quoted from Mopar:

    I primarily stick weld, and actually would be lost without one of them and a cut off saw,
    but mig is the hot set up these days. Once the feed speed and heat are adjusted, it wouldn't
    take a whole lot of time to get the hang of it. I believe now, there are very good 110V migs that
    will penetrate even the thicker metals..
    I'd maybe for now have a machine shop do that quick repair, but also maybe keep an eye out
    on a decent deal for a decent mig. They are all so handy..
    I actually have arc welded thin metal pieces as such, but my guess would be that's not highly
    recommended..

    Thanks, I think I may have incorrectly called it TIG welding, but I saw a video of it being done with a TIG welder. I guess you can use a TIG welder to also do gasless/torchless welding with a flux-core rod/wire. I need to do some more research, I thought someone on here would be familiar with what I'm talking about. I'll investigate MIG welders too. Now seems the time to buy with all the discounting this weekend, I just got to figure out what'll work for this job. I will definitely practice on some scraps before I attempt the thin metal. I understand it's easier to do more damage than good.

    #22 4 months ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    Is that from a TZ? If so, mantis amusements makes new ones with stronger welds.

    It's the Funhouse scoop. I haven't checked if it's available, I probably should before I attempt self-repair on mine!

    Buying new is third in rank though, behind DIY and having a shop fix it.

    #23 4 months ago
    Quoted from schudel5:

    Seems like most pinball repairs could be done with a TIG welder. I do my repairs with a MIG and it does good if I turn the settings down.

    Are you doing gas-less welding? Not sure if that's actually an option with a MIG welder but seems to be for TIG welders. If you are, what model do you use?

    #24 4 months ago

    Read the following

    So if you’re looking to weld without gas, but could see yourself jumping into TIG welding at a later point, we’d suggest getting a multi-process TIG welder that allows you to ARC or Stick weld also.

    If I don't care about going to TIG in the future, what's the right option for inexpensive gas-less welding that could work on this repair?

    #25 4 months ago

    You can only go gas-less if you are using MIG, that's what flux core wire if for. It is hotter and messy, not something that you want to use for thin stainless. To MIG weld that tab back you will need inert gas and thin wire.

    #26 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    Are you doing gas-less welding? Not sure if that's actually an option with a MIG welder but seems to be for TIG welders. If you are, what model do you use?

    I have a 110V Lincoln MIG welder. It has settings on the front (dials) for wire feed speed and amperage. The side has a chart for the settings depending on the wire size you are using and the thickness of the metal you are welding.

    #27 4 months ago
    Quoted from Dart1970:

    You can only go gas-less if you are using MIG, that's what flux core wire if for. It is hotter and messy, not something that you want to use for thin stainless. To MIG weld that tab back you will need inert gas and thin wire.

    It seems many TIG welders also let you do stick welding with flux coated rod/electrode instead of gas. Since the broken tab would seem to just require a quick spot-type weld, I'm wondering why it wouldn't work. But I'm aiming to find out.

    #28 4 months ago

    Been trying learning a little bit and it is frikkin hard . I'd say nickels or dimes are a bit far away... I'm at "a roll of Jack shit" aboot now.

    #29 4 months ago
    Quoted from schudel5:

    I have a 110V Lincoln MIG welder. It has settings on the front (dials) for wire feed speed and amperage. The side has a chart for the settings depending on the wire size you are using and the thickness of the metal you are welding.

    What kind of pinball work have you done with it? Anything similar to this?

    #30 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    What kind of pinball work have you done with it? Anything similar to this?

    Yep I've welded broken scoop tabs with it and wireform ramps. It usually takes a bunch of grinding down after welding but most often you never see it after it's installed.

    #31 4 months ago

    I have been using a Lincoln 175 220v Mig (w/gas), and it worked great on the upper solenoid bracket that broke on the Death drop target on my Family Guy recently. Was back up a running in no time.
    Mig is fairly easy for anyone new to welding.

    #32 4 months ago

    I am a professional fabricator. Been tig welding for 28 years on mostly steel, aluminum, and titanium < .035” this entire time.

    Tig is the most efficient, detailed, precise method of welding there is for thin material and would be the preferred tool for the majority of Pinball related fixes.

    Tig, however, is also the process that requires the most skill to learn and time to master.

    A simple at home system will require the basic machine with smart voltage, Air cooled torch, foot pedal or finger control, ground clamp with cable, tank of inert gas with flow regulator, non-consumable electrodes, filler wire in various sizes and metallurgic compositions, welding hood, light protective gloves, stainless steel brushes, and a bottle of high percentage alcohol and clean cotton cloth’s.

    The most basic of systems can be had for around $1200 all in.

    Acquiring equipment, however, is the easy part. Plan to invest a couple weeks just in learning welding process, theory, and basic set up before you will be able to run even an acceptable bead on flat material, let alone a corner bead on the scoop.

    However, once you attain a basic fundamental level of skill, you will be able to weld thin material and have a finished product with no post fabrication touch up required.

    Cheers,

    Rody

    64CA27E2-3E26-40D8-89FF-47381FAB639A (resized).jpeg66F8D363-9F47-42B8-BD5B-0C07B168E0D4 (resized).jpeg7724FD8F-3FB7-42FC-9904-23262634C16E (resized).jpeg
    #33 4 months ago

    You really can't use a stick to weld thin sheet metal. A stick will burn right through the metal while trying to weld that tab. Best off MIG with gas or TIG.

    #34 4 months ago
    Quoted from Rody:

    I am a professional fabricator. Been tig welding for 28 years on mostly steel, aluminum, and titanium &lt; .035” this entire time.
    Tig is the most efficient, detailed, precise method of welding there is for thin material and would be the preferred tool for the majority of Pinball related fixes.
    Tig, however, is also the process that requires the most skill to learn and time to master.
    A simple at home system will require the basic machine with smart voltage, Air cooled torch, foot pedal or finger control, ground clamp with cable, tank of inert gas with flow regulator, non-consumable electrodes, filler wire in various sizes and metallurgic compositions, welding hood, light protective gloves, stainless steel brushes, and a bottle of high percentage alcohol and clean cotton cloth’s.
    The most basic of systems can be had for around $1200 all in.
    Acquiring equipment, however, is the easy part. Plan to invest a couple weeks just in learning welding process, theory, and basic set up before you will be able to run even an acceptable bead on flat material, let alone a corner bead on the scoop.
    However, once you attain a basic fundamental level of skill, you will be able to weld thin material and have a finished product with no post fabrication touch up required.
    Cheers,
    Rody
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

    Nice beadwork.

    #35 4 months ago
    Quoted from HighVoltage:

    Thanks, I think I may have incorrectly called it TIG welding, but I saw a video of it being done with a TIG welder. I guess you can use a TIG welder to also do gasless/torchless welding with a flux-core rod/wire. I need to do some more research, I thought someone on here would be familiar with what I'm talking about. I'll investigate MIG welders too. Now seems the time to buy with all the discounting this weekend, I just got to figure out what'll work for this job. I will definitely practice on some scraps before I attempt the thin metal. I understand it's easier to do more damage than good.

    Let us know which model you decide on I might get one as well as I think this would be an awesome long term skill.

    #37 4 months ago

    Thanks Rody, on the TIG details. Seems that's the best tool for the job, but that's more involvement and investment than I want to commit to.

    It looks like MIG is the way to go for me. So glad someone verified they've done work like this with one, thanks Mike. Just wish I would have known sooner: $88 MIG welder sale at Harbor Freight ended earlier today. Going to try to find a deal tomorrow though.

    #38 4 months ago

    I don't know how happy you would be with an $88 welder. I found the cheap unit to be quite frustrating.

    The $1500(in 1995) machine is still a joy to use. One of those 'you get what you pay for' things.

    Here are a few worn and broken pin parts that were fixed by mig....

    IMG_0255 (resized).jpg

    #39 4 months ago

    Tig will do the job.

    If I had a tig I could do it. I was a pipe welder before I started a company.

    Problem is tig takes a lot of practice with a lot of materials. And then stainless is a little bit trickier than carbon steel.

    You could get away with mig but it would look worse.

    You should also use a different gas mixture than you would use on the carbon steel. For pipes we would have to purge with nitrogen and use a different mixture of argon and nitrogen.

    But if it's a hidden piece you could get away with a bit. Some of the ugliest welds can be structurally sound.

    You can learn the skill but tig is the hardest to pickup and master out of the different methods.

    If you take the plunge have fun and don't get too frustrated.

    #40 4 months ago
    Quoted from balzofsteel:

    I don't know how happy you would be with an $88 welder.

    Yeah, I've already noticed that many reviews on more expensive welders, the reviewer gave up on the cheap HF ones. I'm going to look for a fully variable heat one. Could always get the Lincoln Electric for $300, but was hoping to find something decent for less.

    #41 4 months ago

    This is what my wife made me as a christmas gift for 2017.

    Unfortunately never found the time, to test it.

    I hope, she bought something good and I can learn welding

    PHOTO-2017-12-24-19-12-22 (resized).jpg

    PHOTO-2017-12-24-19-12-22 (2) (resized).jpg

    PHOTO-2017-11-16-13-31-21 (resized).jpg

    #42 4 months ago

    "Maybe it's more difficult than I imagine."

    highvoltage ...I think you had it right from the start.

    If you'd like the scoop fixed up for the cost of shipping, pm me. I'm feeling warm and fuzzy with the Holidays approaching, would hate to see you ruin it with flux core Mig and a grinder.

    cheers,

    rody

    #44 4 months ago
    Quoted from Rody:

    "Maybe it's more difficult than I imagine."
    highvoltage ...I think you had it right from the start.
    If you'd like the scoop fixed up for the cost of shipping, pm me. I'm feeling warm and fuzzy with the Holidays approaching, would hate to see you ruin it with flux core Mig and a grinder.
    cheers,
    rody

    Well, I'm not that reckless to go straight to work on it. I'm going to see if I can find some scrap / old guides to set up the same situation and see how it goes on that first. I wouldn't use the original as a guinea pig. But given the lack of faith from the pros, maybe I should take you up on your generous offer!

    #45 4 months ago

    I had actually never done any welding until this happened. Not all parts of a car are held together with screws and bolts though.

    But I learned fast.
    Camry (resized).jpg

    Camry2 (resized).jpg

    Camry3 (resized).jpg

    Camry4 (resized).jpg

    #46 4 months ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    I had actually never done any welding until this happened. Not all parts of a car are held together with screws and bolts though.
    But I learned fast.
    [quoted image]
    [quoted image]
    [quoted image]
    [quoted image]

    Crash course in welding .

    #47 4 months ago
    Quoted from trilogybeer:

    Crash course in welding .

    You got that right!

    You can tell your kids over and over when teaching them to drive "slow down and stay away from the car in front of you!"

    But I believe it was that airbag in her face that taught her the driving lesson I never could. It worked too. Three years later and not even a ticket.

    #48 4 months ago

    That's like a 10 second TIG fix at an experienced shop. Versus thousands of dollars and many weekends learning yourself.

    If a tooth is loose, do you go and learn dentistry?

    #49 4 months ago
    Quoted from benheck:

    That's like a 10 second TIG fix at an experienced shop. Versus thousands of dollars and many weekends learning yourself.
    If a tooth is loose, do you go and learn dentistry?

    Great analogy!

    #50 4 months ago
    Quoted from benheck:

    That's like a 10 second TIG fix at an experienced shop. Versus thousands of dollars and many weekends learning yourself.
    If a tooth is loose, do you go and learn dentistry?

    Seems you didn't read the full thread. Others already verified they've done similar fixes with MIG. Plenty have learned MIG-welding on their own. MIG set up is couple hundred dollars.

    If you want a pinball machine, do you go and buy one or build your own?

    If you build your own pinball machine, do you use existing board set or design your own?

    You're the last one I'd expect an odd comment like that from!

    You're against learning a new skill oneself, are you?

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    $ 18.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 119.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 29.99
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 27.25
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    $ 23.75
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    $ 799.00
    Flipper Parts
    Mircoplayfields
    $ 99.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 12.50
    $ 20.00
    Electronics
    Yorktown Parts and Equip
    $ 92.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 18.95
    $ 30.40
    $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 19.99
    $ 36.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    From: $ 22.95
    Playfield - Protection
    ULEKstore
    $ 89.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 25.00
    Boards
    German-Pinball-Modular
    $ 5.00
    From: $ 75.00
    Magazines/books
    The Flipper Room
    $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Nitro Pinball Shop
    There are 67 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside