New! Dark mode!

Browsing Pinside at night? Getting tired of all the white? Switch to dark mode using the button in the top right (or CTRL-B)!

(Topic ID: 127668)

Did Pinball actually commit suicide?


By Blitzburgh99

5 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 124 posts
  • 65 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by Classic_Stern
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 3 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    capcom_small.JPG
    WP_20150118_014.jpg
    Bars.png

    There are 124 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 3.
    #51 5 years ago
    Quoted from FishPharm:

    I'm shocked the major stockholders didn't have an issue with this.

    They would have had a bigger shock if the division "losing" money was sold and then went on to make more money elsewhere.

    Can't let that happen.

    LTG : )™

    #52 5 years ago
    Quoted from TOK:

    I said it in an earlier post, but I disagree the answer is video games. Space Shuttle and High Speed were the first things that lured us away from them.
    Atari was pretty much dead while Williams was still making their biggest games (remember the Jaguar and Lynx? Two giant duds between 89 and 93). They weren't even a real company by 1998, just a name purchased by Hasbro to slap on their gaming division.

    It's not so much a direct correlation, just a side effect.

    1. Pinballs fill entire arcades, or entire locations, and make decent money
    2. Arcade games come out, make just as much or more, but need little maintenance.
    3. Video games comes out, and make people want to play Arcade games less. Arcade games make less money
    4. Instead of relying on more, well maintained pinball machines to replace the lost arcade game revenue, ops are basically spoiled by the arcade video game money and watch it all go down the hole
    5. Arcade industry is buoyed back up by the fighting genre, Street Fighter, Mortal Kombat, etc.
    6. Eventually even those are surpassed by home games

    So you're left with a position where video games killed arcade games, and pinball was a casualty of it.

    Just my opinion. Once there were less and less pins around less people were playing and now you have an entire generation who have never even seen one. Even if you put lots of machines on location and kept them maintained, it'd be hard to get in a spot where kids would play it, or even know what it was.

    Then add onto all of that the other factors like Lloyd mentioned, rising overhead but yet the price never went up to $1 a game like it should be for inflation, etc.

    What has been lost is almost impossible to recreate... but I definitely think home video games killed it after the money had already been usurped by the arcade games that needed little maintenance.

    #53 5 years ago
    Quoted from Pinballwiz45b:

    Kind of off topic:
    "Atari" still exists today, believe it or not. Infogrames is wearing their dead skin, with a very small staff. Question is: Why would they emerge out of bankruptcy, only to lose more money in the process?
    It's not even the real Atari anyway. Bunch of copyright trolls, bullying Jeff Minter and his brilliant TxK game. I bet he'd make a better version of Asteroids instead of what they came up with recently.
    OP: Now I'm pretty mad that Neil Nicastro hated pinball. I'd be surprised if he's still the head of WMS today.

    Just like I said... the real Atari hasn't existed since the mid-90's, years before Williams bailed on pinball.

    #54 5 years ago
    Quoted from TOK:

    Not sure about the console gaming thing. A couple great era's in pinball co-incided with strong periods in video gaming. Breakthrough System 80 games like Haunted House were in the 2600 era, and System 11 was strong clear through the NES era.
    I was out of vids and pins when the Playstation was released, but wasn't that in the mid to late 90's when Williams was killing it with stuff like Twilight Zone and Adams Family?

    Sony PlayStation was released in US in holidays of '95.

    #55 5 years ago

    Mid 90's console gaming is what started my decline of visiting arcades for sure. I'm much happier playing pinball at home.

    #56 5 years ago

    Console gaming has been around since 1977 or so and commerical video games since 1972. Pinball biggests highs were 1977-1980 and another one around 1992-94.
    I don't believe video games or console video games were the major contributor to pinball declines. When pinball almost died in 1983, video games almost went with it. It looked to be an industry wide collapse of oversaturation of the commercial market and oversaturation of crappy home console games.
    Pinball appeared to be doing really well during the height of the first Nintendo. It's the lack of locations and arcades that killed it off most.

    I think the 3 things that led most to the decline of the arcade and locations are
    The Internet (WWW started in 1994)
    People going out to eat and entertaining at home instead of the other way around.(possibly because of the internet)
    And possibly Liability Insurance. Used to be there was a video game and a pinball in every circle K and 7-11 across the country and eventually they all disappeared. Was this because they didn't want kids loitering around the stores or their insurance rates were higher with them?

    #57 5 years ago
    Quoted from kbliznick:

    I don't believe video games or console video games were the major contributor to pinball declines. When pinball almost died in 1983, video games almost went with it. It looked to be an industry wide collapse of oversaturation of the commercial market

    During the video fad years ( 1979-1981 ) pinball went with it. Lots of new arcades opened up, around 50,000 nation wide. After the fad died, with in a few years most of the new locations were gone. And with them a place to put equipment.

    LTG : )™

    -1
    #58 5 years ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    During the video fad years ( 1979-1981 ) pinball went with it. Lots of new arcades opened up, around 50,000 nation wide. After the fad died, with in a few years most of the new locations were gone. And with them a place to put equipment.
    LTG : )™

    And somewhere on a different forum users are lamenting over the death of the self serve frozen yogurt craze. Things come and go and then weirdos like us cry about it.

    The only trends you can count on are titties and beer.

    #59 5 years ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    They would have had a bigger shock if the division "losing" money was sold and then went on to make more money elsewhere.
    Can't let that happen.
    LTG : )™

    I would guess that it is pretty common for when a division is sold off for it to make money. Large companies in several different markets are valued by investors for less than the sum of their parts. In other words, investors tend to value smaller companies with a singular focus more than that same department under a large umbrella company. What happened doesn't make sense but spin offs are not always about a company trying to dump a troubled division and can be about increasing company value by reducing scope.

    #60 5 years ago
    Quoted from Det_Deckard:

    I would guess that it is pretty common for when a division is sold of for it to make money.

    Of course.

    Who would buy a division of a company just to loose money with it?

    #61 5 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Of course.
    Who would buy a division of a company just to loose money with it?

    Mitt Romney and Bain Capital were making money while bankrupting companies like Toy's R Us while stripping them of all their assets.

    #62 5 years ago
    Quoted from Det_Deckard:

    Mitt Romney and Bain Capital were making money while bankrupting companies like Toy's R Us while stripping them of all their assets.

    That's a very Mitt thing to do.

    But he was still buying companies to make money, not to loose it.

    #63 5 years ago

    It didn't commit suicide....public video arcades were murdered by home entertainment gaming, and the remains of route pinball went down with it.

    #64 5 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    That's a very Mitt thing to do.
    But he was still buying companies to make money, not to loose it.

    Yeah, he did but I am just pointing out how a division with no means of making a profit might still be purchased by someone.

    #65 5 years ago
    Quoted from wayout440:

    It didn't commit suicide....public video arcades were murdered by home entertainment gaming, and the remains of route pinball went down with it.

    Exactly..." Cocooning" effect, along with lowering disposable income ( fact of life anymore) have people shopping online, doing more home entertainment, ( hell, you can even order groceries conveniently ).

    Even " Albums" are being recorded in home studios, released online for download, etc.

    Tech and the Times....just the way it is.....

    2 weeks later
    #66 5 years ago

    Fascinating thread, so many vectors for what is currently a niche market on the upswing. I've kicked around a number of pin-enabling business plans but have yet to see one that I think is sustainable, let alone profitable. Yet. Sorry I'm late to the discussion, hope you don't mind if I try to catch up.

    Quoted from Blitzburgh99:

    There seems to be a fair share of blame to go around as to why pinball died out at the end of the '90s…video games, etc.

    For me personally, it was a lack of places to play them. I haven't walked past a pinball machine without playing it since long before I had quarters of my own. My old lady turned out to be a pinhead too, something I discovered a year or so into dating her while commiserating over our lack of local machines to play. We knew where every machine was where we lived at the time (Amish country PA) and what condition it was in. We played pinball a couple occasions a year and tended to go at it like a bindging crackhead when we did. Found out a few years later, she acquired her 'habit' in the game room of the general store in the tiny town where we met, where there always were one or two machines. Cyclone & TAF are the only two I recall, but they worked and were changed out every however often.

    Quoted from LTG:

    It was what happened to money starting about 1990/1991. Our dollar was losing value.

    That problem goes back further than that... My parents had to sell our 3rd generation family business and moved from Nebraska to PA in '87 because of the recession and the S&L garbage (yes, bankers and investors have been screwing up the economy fraudulently for a long time). As a child, I watched every bank except one fail in our town - most farms in bankruptcy, etc. Save the Family Farm Act my ass.

    Quoted from vid1900:

    One man is responsible: Neil Nicastro

    I love your posts Vid and respect your ninja knowledge, but one man is rarely responsible for destroying an industry. I think there were more factors than one massive cocksucker.

    Quoted from kbliznick:

    But in a generally literal sense I always presumed that cocksuckers had their reasons...

    Didn't Lenny Bruce say something along the lines of, "People say it as an insult but I wouldn't marry anyone who wasn't one."

    Quoted from playernumber4:

    All the municipalities killed it by purposely trying to close down every arcade because kids were buying and selling weed in them so commonly.

    Pretty sure that did happen. I was an arcade rat from the first time I set foot in the mall in my single-digit years. Arcades closed, never went to the mall again unless I was being paid to. And yes, I remember weed and other things changing hands. I was still devoted to religion back then so not only was I not involved but it must have been obvious to others if the Cornhusker kid noticed.

    Quoted from bigd1979:

    Yep very true I haven't been back(2011) since a cop followed me on my birthday and I actually was under the legal limit but he took me in anyhow bc I got mouthy with his off duty buddy at the bar(which is y he followed me) bc i took the lady he was trying to get with lol.

    Win or lose? The case, not the lady.

    Quoted from TaTa:

    Here in Pa, the three top revenue producers for the state are State run lotteries, State run Liquor Control Board and Stae wide DWI conviction. We here like to get you drunk so we can pull you over for even more profit

    I'm still waiting for the class action lawsuit where convicted DUI offenders sue for false prosecution on the grounds that the Commonwealth of PA engaged in a system of entrapment. Word of advice: if you ever get into that situation, fight it. They know how to do the paperwork but they suck in court, which is why they make it so hard to want to fight. Testify if you're good on the spot, because they will definitely be testilying against you.

    Also, the young'n keeps asking when she can play your TWDLE again. I think it's because she loved all the attention she got by playing at the end of the tourney but then again, AC/DC is her fav pin evar so maybe a 7y/o can discern what's fun for herself as well as I can. whotfknows.

    WP_20150118_014.jpg

    Quoted from Det_Deckard:

    Mitt Romney and Bain Capital were making money while bankrupting companies like Toy's R Us while stripping them of all their assets.

    What can I say, it's good "business". Speaking as someone who worked for Rubbermaid when Newell bought them and eviscerated them. Best sales quarter ever? Get rid of the free coffee machines, first step to reducing costs!

    Quoted from radium:

    The only trends you can count on are titties and beer.

    Believe me, if I could play pinball and look at titties while my warm beer is in the pingulp... my game would suck.

    #67 5 years ago

    I got out of the dui but still hear the same stories from my friends that they just sit and wait outside the bar of close by

    #68 5 years ago
    Quoted from radium:

    The only trends you can count on are titties and beer.

    In Aus beer's losing sales to wine. Lots and lots of sales, in fact: as I recall more wine is sold downunder than beer now.

    I'll give you 'alcohol and beer'

    #69 5 years ago
    Quoted from bigd1979:

    I got out of the dui but still hear the same stories from my friends that they just sit and wait outside the bar of close by

    They do it here too. Even write down plate numbers so they can google their lucky targets and sort them by cup size. There have been local bars that were stuck with that reputation for nearly a decade. It's culture meets commerce... Here in Pennsyltucky, you've always got a friend in that the ossifer is still loaded from his night before and/or contradicts his own written statement, which he had plenty of time to read on his way to court while clocking overtime pay. But nobody fights, they all enter the cattle chutes. It's sad and un-American.

    #70 5 years ago

    I'm not sure that any one thing is to blame for the fall of pinball. If I stop to think about it, it could be Neil, it could be video games, computers, internet or same old same old formula of batting a ball around a box, it could be cost to build, it could be inflated egos and their salaries...or it could be a combination of all these things that made the perfect storm for game over.

    Being a steady patron of the local arcade scene in the late 80's and early 90's, I can tell you that I didn't have a lot of money to spend in the arcade, and it didn't seem like many of the people around me did either, and they didn't seem to spend as much time as I wanted to in there.
    People would come in off the beach, play some games and leave. There were always steady crowds at the NBA JAM, Mortal Kombat.

    This beach side arcade had EVERYTHING, new, old, if it came out, they had it. Much of it was video and redemption and I learned early on that playing for a quarter or two for 30 seconds kind of sucked. When I discovered pinball and the ability to match/win free games, along with extra balls and prolonged play, I was hooked.

    When TAF came out, that game was something special, and there were lines to play it. The years went by, I became a teenager and my interests wandered. There was a good solid 6 years that I consider my ''lost years'' of literally playing no silverball.

    Now if I was a die hard then, (and I am in this current day) and I wandered out at the peak of the Williams/Bally era, what were all the casual people doing? Were they on the computer and the internet? Were the arcade kids getting caught up in the playstation and N64 craze? Pretty much, yes.
    Pinball at this time was also bloated. The designers talked about the need to ''out do'' each other on every game that came along. We look at some of those games now and marvel, we love them! At the time, it didn't impress enough, and it was expensive to be that fancy.

    As technology started to boom, peoples interests changed. Arcades started to close their doors. Games like Virtual fighter, Mortal Kombat and NFL blitz, soon came to home consoles. Why go out and stand at a screen when you can grab your buds and plop on the couch for a buffet of gaming?
    Pinball machines were not selling, and container after container of pinball machines came from over seas back to the states at a dime a dozen almost. NIB Williams/Bally games like NGG and CV were being dumped for peanuts.

    I was at a stupid motel in Orlando Florida back in 2000, and I happened to wander up to the front lobby. I never expected to find what I did, which was a Medieval Madness. I had never played it, never heard of it, never seen it. Once I played that, I was blown away, and the hook was in- again. It never left and I never forgot it.

    We're the diehards. The people with games in their homes, and we sit on pinside and read post after post and sometimes, we type long winded nostalgia trips from the past and question why this or that, because to us we just don't understand why.

    and for the people that aren't diehards? Honestly, they really don't get it and really don't care...

    But would we have it any other way?

    #71 5 years ago

    Aside from all the various factors already mentioned there is one other factor that I think also played a big factor: besides Bally / Williams there was another player in town: Data East / Sega. I understood they offered their games cheaper than B/W. What I personally (and this is just an opinion) think that didn't help pinball in general was the fact that most (if not all) DE/Sega games would award multiball on ball 3 if you hadn't played it yet. To me that took a lot of fun out of the game. Add shallow rules and several mediocre games that earned poorly and you can see operators getting hesitant to buying more similar games that earned less. Don't get me wrong, there are quite a few DE and Sega games that I like, but their impact on the operators market and contribution to the decline of pinball if often overlooked. I'm not saying it was the biggest factor, but it certainly was part of the mix.

    #72 5 years ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    Aside from all the various factors already mentioned there is one other factor that I think also played a big factor: besides Bally / Williams there was another player in town: Data East / Sega. I understood they offered their games cheaper than B/W. What I personally (and this is just an opinion) think that didn't help pinball in general was the fact that most (if not all) DE/Sega games would award multiball on ball 3 if you hadn't played it yet. To me that took a lot of fun out of the game. Add shallow rules and several mediocre games that earned poorly and you can see operators getting hesitant to buying more similar games that earned less. Don't get me wrong, there are quite a few DE and Sega games that I like, but their impact on the operators market and contribution to the decline of pinball if often overlooked. I'm not saying it was the biggest factor, but it certainly was part of the mix.

    I don't know about that... I get what you're saying, but when I was young, and I played some of these, I think it worked on me and my novice’ness, in that I enjoyed being able to somehow get the MB. It felt like I accomplished something, it did in every game.

    Not to mention DE games were not really shallow, games like LAH, Tommy, TFTC, just to name a few, have tons of modes, and although the sega games got more shallow, so to speak, so did b/w’s wpc95s.

    #73 5 years ago

    You know it's kind if funny this day in age if you think about it. One of the main factors that killed pinball was the presence of arcade machines, and later on the development of the home video game market (which ironically also killed said arcade machines). Now that industry is struggling (particularly in China) due to the explosion of mobile phones and tablets. There is so much shovelware and cheap entertainment available for these devices that I believe people are beginning to get burned out over it (plus Pinball Arcade). So people who are nostalgic for these machines, including plenty of younger folks, are going back to playing location pinball because it's a simply an experience you can't get anywhere else. And thanks to the recent resurgence in the collector market, the games are actually available for play and can be still maintained to a very high degree thanks to the dozen or so online parts stores and proliferation of information through the internet. It's like the moons have aligned and the scene is coming full circle.

    #74 5 years ago

    Not to mention the simplicity of it. No learn the keyboard, plus it times alt, ctrl, func (many PC games), there isn't the hey this game/app needs permission for this, this and this on your cell (f that), and there is a plunger and two buttons to play - it's all skill and no tech (to play of course).

    #75 5 years ago

    I can tell you from my personal experience of being a teen in the 80s that arcade video games were all the rage and pins were no where to be found. By the time I went to college in the 90s arcades were shutting down because home gaming was far superior due to Moore's Law. By then no arcades = no pins to play. This was in WI. Fast forward to pinball resurgence because it's a new experience for so many of us. A little bit of innovative gameplay with real artwork and ball physics that require skill in a digital world full of repetitive online hack designed games.

    #76 5 years ago

    The death of the arcades contributed greatly...It's amazing to see the resurgence though; so cool; especially to see kids come over and go what is this?? Then they start playing and see the attraction of pinball.

    We were lucky to all grow up in the era that we did, because that revolution will never happen again.

    #77 5 years ago
    Quoted from FishPharm:

    After seeing a documentary on it, I agree with others that say it made no sense for Williams to just sit on their pinball division and not sell it off. I'm shocked the major stockholders didn't have an issue with this. Every company is out to make money so not selling this part off makes zero sense. For me, this proves what Vid1900 is saying is true. The CEO must have hated the pinball division for some reason...

    Perhaps he didn't want pinball machines (a form of coin based entertainment) competing with William's slot machine business.

    #78 5 years ago

    Competing? Lol, in the year 1999 that would be the least of his worries.

    #79 5 years ago

    Point being, their was a business reason behind why he did it...not a personal hatred for an inanimate object.

    #80 5 years ago

    Pilfered from some place I can't recall:

    "Families used to eat at home, and then go out to have fun. Now, families go out to eat and then come home to have fun."

    No one is really going to blame the demise of pinball on any one thing. Cultural trends, video games, Popeye, Nicastro - they all played a role.

    #81 5 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    They did not call him The Cocksucker for nothing.

    He ended up becoming head writer for Deadwood.

    #82 5 years ago
    Quoted from Crash:

    You know it's kind if funny this day in age if you think about it. One of the main factors that killed pinball was the presence of arcade machines, and later on the development of the home video game market (which ironically also killed said arcade machines). Now that industry is struggling (particularly in China) due to the explosion of mobile phones and tablets. There is so much shovelware and cheap entertainment available for these devices that I believe people are beginning to get burned out over it (plus Pinball Arcade). So people who are nostalgic for these machines, including plenty of younger folks, are going back to playing location pinball because it's a simply an experience you can't get anywhere else. And thanks to the recent resurgence in the collector market, the games are actually available for play and can be still maintained to a very high degree thanks to the dozen or so online parts stores and proliferation of information through the internet. It's like the moons have aligned and the scene is coming full circle.

    i think you hit on something important -- how pinball is now a more unique experience than ever. video arcades died because anyone could get the same (or superior) experience at home or on their phone. Pinball has a unique advantage in that regard -- nothing digital can ever truly replicate what real pinball is like. no matter how good the engines behind TPA and other simulators get, they will only ever whet, not satiate, the appetite for the real thing, which is a physical and mechanical experience that simply can't be had on a phone, tablet, or desktop.

    #83 5 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    Things are looking up but the barcade may go out of fashion any time soon.

    I mentioned this elsewhere. I wish it weren't the case, but pinball is definitely receiving a sorta faux boost from the "retro" seeking 20-somethings currently. When they get bored of it, they'll move on and pretend they never liked it because it isn't cool anymore. But it'll make some long-term fans in the process, so it is a win regardless. I'm not trying to lump every 20-something into this category, I know there are plenty here in this demo that are in for the long-haul. This is just a hipster-hate rant.

    How soon before the barcade phenomenon ends? Maybe a couple of years more. What sort of impact will it have on the hobby? Probably not much, these aren't the type of people to buy pins probably anyway.

    #84 5 years ago
    Quoted from shacklersrevenge:

    and for the people that aren't diehards? Honestly, they really don't get it and really don't care...

    the teeming, unwashed masses 'get' very little these days. when Marx wrote "Die Religion ist das Opium des Volkes", he didn't have any way to predict said religion would be [fill in the blank*].

    * - trying not to push random hot buttons this week, let's see how i do.

    #85 5 years ago
    Quoted from thedefog:

    How soon before the barcade phenomenon ends? Maybe a couple of years more. What sort of impact will it have on the hobby? Probably not much, these aren't the type of people to buy pins probably anyway.

    barcades will go away as soon as people stop playing the machines. bowling alleys make zero sense on paper but there's probably one near you... may have recently closed, but that's your target market IMO. leisure time, not on the couch but not too athletic either.

    #86 5 years ago
    Quoted from kmoore88:

    Point being, their was a business reason behind why he did it...not a personal hatred for an inanimate object.

    No, he actually just hated the pinball division and the people he employed to build it.

    Neil did not even allow people from the pinball division to move into other departments. They had to apply for job openings like anyone else off the street.

    Don't take my word for it, the next expo you attend, buy a few rounds for Gomez or Ritchie and let them just naturally start talking about Niel.

    #87 5 years ago
    Quoted from emkay:

    barcades will go away as soon as people stop playing the machines. bowling alleys make zero sense on paper but there's probably one near you... may have recently closed, but that's your target market IMO. leisure time, not on the couch but not too athletic either.

    Bowling alleys have survived largely because they're one of the last places kids can go to hang out with friends. Bowling alleys near me are packed on weekend nights. Barcade unfortunately doesn't cater to all ages.

    #88 5 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    No, he actually just hated the pinball division and the people he employed to build it.
    Neil did not even allow people from the pinball division to move into other departments. They had to apply for job openings like anyone else off the street.
    Don't take my word for it, the next expo you attend, buy a few rounds for Gomez or Ritchie and let them just naturally start talking about Niel.

    It's a good thing Neil Nicastro couldn't shut down Stern.

    Basically, he failed. The designers and programmers went to Stern.

    #89 5 years ago
    Quoted from thedefog:

    Bowling alleys have survived largely because they're one of the last places kids can go to hang out with friends. Bowling alleys near me are packed on weekend nights.

    The bowling centers around me are indeed crowded on weekends, but they had to up their game.

    Now they have blacklights, glowing pins, "rock" music, and strobes that flash when you get a strike.

    No more country music and chubby guys in tight bowling shirts.

    #90 5 years ago
    Quoted from nosro:

    The bowling centers around me are indeed crowded on weekends, but they had to up their game.
    Now they have blacklights, glowing pins, "rock" music, and strobes that flash when you get a strike.
    No more country music and chubby guys in tight bowling shirts.

    and you forgot to mention a line of slot machines where the pins used to live.at least the 2-places by me...everything you mention ,plenty of beer for the old man and his wife just pouring money into the slots .something for the whole family to do together? how nice

    #91 5 years ago
    Quoted from playernumber4:

    Bars are disappearing here in the US too. When the portable breathalyzers (PBTs) came out initially (maybe in the early 80's) they were only to be used as an "exclusionary tool" for when a cop pulled a guy over but was not sure if he should let the guy drive home or not. If he blew under a .010 the cops would let him go. Well, after about 5 years of those tools being around some cops got the bright idea that they could make a lot of money in court for overtime if they pulled over every car that left a bar and stuck a PBT in his mouth. And thats what happened. They did it enough to get the PBT results admitted in court as evidence, and the cops sit outside the bars now when they close somebody gets a PBT stuck in their mouth, and a cop gets himself some overtime later and a pat on the head from his boss that night. The word spreads through the bar and the customers stop going there. Lots of bars around here have closed as a result.

    Interesting, since you can only use a blood test here in Ohio as evidence in a DWI case.

    #92 5 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    The bowling centers around me are indeed crowded on weekends, but they had to up their game.
    Now they have blacklights, glowing pins, "rock" music, and strobes that flash when you get a strike.
    No more country music and chubby guys in tight bowling shirts.

    Yup, "cosmic" bowling. The alleys by me that don't have it on weekends are catered to adults.

    #93 5 years ago

    Given the proliferation of LEDs in games now, I'd say the "cosmic" part has taken off in pinball as well...

    Oof my eyes!

    #94 5 years ago
    Quoted from snyper2099:

    Interesting, since you can only use a blood test here in Ohio as evidence in a DWI case.

    In PA the PBT can't even be mentioned in court. Blood is preferred, Staties sometimes have a properly calibrated breathalyzer - black box, little smaller than a microwave and half as tall. They don't use breath very much because it's far more contested in court, as it should be. I remind people all the time not to give evidence against themselves unless it's inevitable.

    #95 5 years ago
    Quoted from thedefog:

    Barcade unfortunately doesn't cater to all ages.

    The one near us does - kids are welcome until 9pm (or later if they're cool, lol), separate dining room & deck but the kids swarm the pins. Unfortunately, the feral ones tend to treat them rather poorly. http://railroadstreet.com/

    #96 5 years ago
    Quoted from Captain_Kirk:

    It's a good thing Neil Nicastro couldn't shut down Stern.
    Basically, he failed. The designers and programmers went to Stern.

    Stern is not perfect.
    But yes, I admire them for saving pinball.

    #97 5 years ago

    Hmm, maybe Neil Nicastro got tired of JPoP's narcissism and it motivated him to shut down the division entirely, solely to put JPOP out of work. So I posit that JPOP is indeed responsible for the demise of Bally/Williams and pinball in general.

    #98 5 years ago

    All right, let's review.

    #1 Bars are not going out of business all over the US.

    #2 Barcades are going to be around a lot more than a "couple of years."

    #99 5 years ago
    Quoted from Captain_Kirk:

    The designers and programmers went to Stern.

    And in a few years he laid most of them off.

    LTG : (

    #100 5 years ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    And in a few years he laid most of them off.
    LTG : (

    Ritchie, Lyman, Gomez, and Sullivan are still there.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 179.00
    Flipper Parts
    Mircoplayfields
    $ 6.00
    Electronics
    German-Pinball-Modular
    $ 5.00
    Cabinet - Other
    UpKick Pinball
    $ 29.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 58.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lermods
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 20.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 24.99
    Lighting - Led
    Lee's Parts
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 4.49
    Electronics
    Yorktown Arcade Supply
    $ 159.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    £ 99.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    PinballToys
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 129.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 35.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    3D MODS
    From: $ 449.00
    $ 15.00
    Playfield - Plastics
    Pinball Haus
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 28.00
    Playfield - Other
    Pin Monk
    $ 18.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    $ 54.99
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 20.00
    Cabinet - Other
    Filament Printing
    $ 89.00
    Boards
    Pappy's Pinball Palace
    $ 15.00
    Playfield - Decals
    Metal-Mods
    $ 65.00
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Texas Pinball
    $ 199.99
    Lighting - Led
    PinballBulbs
    $ 7,599.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    $ 66.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 20.00
    Lighting - Other
    Professor Pinball
    There are 124 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 3.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside