? Creating EM- Backglass Copies ?

(Topic ID: 37338)

? Creating EM- Backglass Copies ?


By Pin-it

5 years ago



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  • 54 posts
  • 27 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 7 days ago by Luzur
  • Topic is favorited by 14 Pinsiders

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There are 54 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
#1 5 years ago

Not sure if someone has had success with this.
I have seen some paper ones on some EM s at the York pin show with mixed feelings.
Just wondering what your input on this is?

Anyone ever take a backglass scan it and make a high quality print and sandwich it in between two thin pieces of glass curious as to what you think.

You would think in this technology laden society we have today someone would be able to replicate something even close to them.

The only issues I see are obviously its not original from a value point but who cares if it saves them!
Does the lights show properly through the copy (paper?/ transparent vinyl?) would it be acceptable? and if done properly I would think it could be done at an inexpensive cost.

On the plus side you might be able to do playfield plastics in the same type of procedure just make them sandwiched between two thin plastic/lexan sheets?

All I know if it works and looks acceptable I would go that route.

What do you think?

Thanks ,

#2 5 years ago
Quoted from Pin-it:

I have seen some paper ones on some EM s at the York pin show with mixed feelings.
Just wondering what your input on this is?

If I was low on $$ and had no Backglass for the machine then I would consider it but with $$ and a bad Backglass I would most likely wait for a ink reproduction.

Ken

#3 5 years ago
Quoted from EM-PINMAN:

If I was low on $$ and had no Backglass for the machine then I would consider it but with $$ and a bad Backglass I would most likely wait for a ink reproduction.
Ken

Could be a long wait for some of the less popular ones.

I would be very interested is trying this.

Anyone have a hi rez scan of a Gottlieb Sure Shot?

#4 5 years ago
Quoted from jkmboler:

Anyone have a hi rez scan of a Gottlieb Sure Shot?

I think that is a very popular title that is due for a ink reproduction Backglass very soon and that machine is on my wishlist to buy in the very near future.

I bet it will be Shay Group or Ron Webb that does it.

Ken

#5 5 years ago

I think Izzy up north of me is making backglasses for his games using photography and sandwiching the art between 2 pieces of glass. I saw one he did at the PAGG show last year that looked real nice.

#6 5 years ago

I've been searching for a backglass for a Williams Jubilee machine for 2 years now with no luck, I would love to obtain a high quality scan that I could use to reproduce this backglass as this particular machine will probably never see a genuine reproduction due to its low rating. Anything would be better than the sun bleached and peeling backglass that I currently have. I just recently purchased a repro from Ed Cheung for my Space Shuttle, while it doesn't have the mirroring of an original and looks fabulous behind a cut piece of lexan, it is a hell of a lot better than no art at all and will get me by till I come across an original. After reading his website he put an enormous amount of work into it to match the colors and look of the original.

#7 5 years ago
Quoted from 72Devilz:

I've been searching for a backglass for a Williams Jubilee machine for 2 years now with no luck, I would love to obtain a high quality scan that I could use to reproduce this backglass as this particular machine

Your wish has been granted!

Contact Gary Conway

Phone 360-692-2230 or email at backglassreprints@yahoo.com.

He can make a Translite for you.

Ken

#8 5 years ago
Quoted from EM-PINMAN:

Your wish has been granted!
Contact Gary Conway
Phone 360-692-2230 or email at backglassreprints@yahoo.com.
He can make a Translite for you.
Ken

You are my hero! Email sent!

#9 5 years ago
Quoted from 72Devilz:

You are my hero! Email sent!

Glad I could help.

When you get it post a new thread and post pics of the translite before putting it in the machine.

I have heard nothing but praises about Gary's work.

Ken

#10 5 years ago

Of course cost is a weighing issue, if the cost is reasonable then I will move on it but if it is pricey then I may opt to put that money towards my next acquisition.

#11 5 years ago

Got your pm devils. If the translite doesn't happen ill shoot pics of mine.

-Jeff

#12 5 years ago
Quoted from 72Devilz:

but if it is pricey then I may opt to put that money towards my next acquisition.

He may even already have a scan for it but you will find out soon enough price and all.

Ken

#13 5 years ago

see this link. probably more informative on the backglass restoration process with before and afters than any of the other restorers.
http://www.bgresto.com

#14 5 years ago

Thanks for the link cfh.

#15 5 years ago

Gary's work is amazing. Compare his WMS Klondike to an original and try to tell which is which.

Frank -

#16 5 years ago

I have done this exact thing a number of times.Basically when you can't find a backglass and yours is either totally trashed or missing altogether.You get the highest resolution pix you can find,photoshop the heck out of it to correct all the errors and expand it to the correct size.Go to your local office supply place and have them print a fuill scale color copy of it.Go to Menards and buy two 28"x 30" pieces of plexiglass for $10 a piece and cut them to the correct size.Sandwich the print between the pieces of plexiglass and you have your backglass.Cost for the print is usually about 10 to 20 bucks.It looks ok when the lights are off but when you turn the machine on you can really see paper.It looks not too good.But I use this to check the size and geometry and quality of the artwork and to get something up there before I spend the bucks to get a translite made.It gets the artwork back up there and and beats staring at those lightbulbs blaring in your face.Here is a picture of two of mine using this exact method.The right one (Eightball)is an original factory backglass in near perfect condition.The center machine (Blackout)is a translite I made using this method.The far left machine (Steeplechase) is one that I am still working on and it is a printed piece of paper between two pieces of plexiglass.When I get the artwork in better shape I will have a translite made of it.It's not a s good as an original screen printed backglass but it's a damn sight better than nothing,or a horribly peeling or cracked and broken backglass and you can use your machine without it bugging you horribly till you can find an actual backglass.

PC230177.JPG

#17 5 years ago

Here is another one I just did also.That is a piece of paper between two pieces of plexiglass.It looks fine until you turn the machine on then you can see the flaws in the paper.Shine a flashlight through a piece of copier paper and you will see what I mean.But if the artwork looks fine with the lights off then you spend the money and do a translite.The Blackout translite in the pix above cost me $50 from GameonGrafix and the colors blazing out of that translite make that factory Eightball backglass look dull in comparison.

PC150177_(2).JPG PC150178_(2).JPG

#18 5 years ago

John Greatwich in Canada is doing some good stuff with direct inking using inkjet(?) printing. I have seen samples that came to Pinball Resource for approval by Steve. They are not perfect (colors still a little less brilliant, and slightly less opaque where they should be)but are very nice compared to do it yourself. It seems like most of these alternatives to silk screening are just not quite the same in those two respects. I applaud all efforts to do this work as it's very skilled/precise to clean up scans, etc. Even the reproduction silk screened efforts are not always exactly the same as the originals. I guess it comes down to improving on bad or missing glass to make a game look decent.

#19 5 years ago

You are right,they are definately not as good as a silkscreened backglass.But they are better than nothing.I will be the first in line to buy a Blackout backglass as soon as anybody ever remakes one.Until then like alot of other pinball restorers we do the best we can with what we have.It keeps from parting out alot of pinball machines and gives people some options that have some of the lesser known machines with no chance of ever getting a remade backglass.If you get it right the average person would never know that it wasn't an original backglass.Someone who is alot more into this thing will spot it right off the bat of course.

#20 5 years ago

What about printing on mylar instead of paper?

Should give a cleaner look when backlite.

#21 5 years ago

So for me the big question is where do you get the hires pics from?

I have a Williams Super Star and Gulftream in need of some backglass love...

#22 5 years ago

I was thinking of going to a printing shop and see what they could do

#23 5 years ago

How/where do you get a scan?
This is the only pic I've ever seen of the BG I need. It's not a very good BG, but it's much better than the one I have now.
http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=2112&picno=7503

#24 5 years ago

You just have to keep your eyes peeled for a pix all the time.Check EBAY constantly,sometimes somebody will take a higher rez pix of the backglass to show a flaw.Try all the other pinball websites.Ask people here if someone can get you a high quality pix of the backglass.You have to be relentless till you come up with a good quality pix.You need 2000x1500 realistically for it to look anythig close to good and higher than 72 DPI if you can,although the Blackout in the pix above is 72 DPI and it looks pretty good unless you get right on top of it.

#25 5 years ago

By the way,the "Top Score" backglass in the pix above that I made was from a pix on EBAY.

#26 5 years ago

Did anyone look into this?

http://backlitposters.com/ + this looks promising > http://www.coos.net/bingo_e/For_Sale.html

#27 5 years ago

I had to repro the playfield glass in a '67 rifle range, and did something similar.

Scanned the glass in (a LOT was missing). Photoshoped everything back in as best I could, then took the image to Kinkos and had them print on mylar. Did one on a clear, and one on a white-backed mylar plastic sheet.

The white-backed stuff worked great! Diffuses the light. Looks perfect. Very close to Translight material.

Hand painted the fluorescent accents on it and sandwiched between two pieces of glass (I didnt go for plexi).

Go talk to your local printer or Kinkos.

If you have the file, they'll be able to hook you up. Some great advancements in printing and substrates over the past few years.

Good luck!

#28 5 years ago

I think jukehero1 has the right approach but printing on paper will never give good enough results.

I took some hi rez photos of my Sure Shot backglass last night and have been cleaning it up with PhotoShop. When I get that done, I am going to print it on Mylar and see how it looks.

Mylar is frosted (gives a very nice backlite appearance with little or no hotspotting, stable (wont sag or wrinkle like paper) is moisture stable.

2 posts up (pin-it), this link: http://backlitposters.com/ is for a company printing on Mylar.

I have access to a new HP color inkjet (48" wide bed with continious feed from a rool) and we use Mylar for Engineering Design Drawings.

#29 5 years ago

Anyone interested in a good material, check this stuff out: Inkpress Media Backlight film.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=backlight+film&N=0&InitialSearch=yes&sts=ma&Top+Nav-Search=

It's a plastic material for inkjet printers and comes in sizes up to 60"wide (rolls).
It comes out with a good deep coulour, and is translucent after printing (some other films are somewhat transparent, and lamps are visible thru them).

#30 5 years ago

I will have to try it on Mylar.Never tried that yet.The paper was never meant to be anything more permanent than checking your artwork.With all the work you do on the graphics file you need to make sure all your score window centering and feature lights and everything line up.It will almost always be off significantly somewhere,certainly enough that you will need to correct for it before you print something more permanent.Need to do a fullscale trial run first,and do it as cheaply as possible (hence the paper)...since it will be off somewhere and you will likely toss it to do the corrected version in a more permanent mylar or translite or whatever..I'm curious on the cost of doing this on mylar though.Does anyone have some numbers cost wise?

#31 5 years ago

Very interesting stuff. I have spent quite a bit of time creating a vector trace of my Klondike backglass. The reason for the vector drawing is to make the use of spot colors possible. Even though the inkjet printer I will use is cmyk, it has a set of spot color swatches that it does a great job with. My intention is to print the artwork on translucent vinyl with the windows cut out. Then create a second layer on opaque vinyl of just the lighted shapes cut out. Line up both and laminate them together and mount them behind glass like a translite.

#32 5 years ago

I think you might be on to something there pafasa.

I think as long as your mask is opaque enough, and both pieces register properly it will look awesome.

#33 5 years ago

http://www.backlitposters.com/duratrans.html#faq < Read for pricing)

Backlit Posters' DuraTrans utilizes state-of-the-art large format inkjet printers to produce stunning backlit media that easily rival the quality of the Eastman Kodaks brand of DuraTrans at a fraction of the price. Our backlit prints are produced at 1440 dpi for photographic quality images that display flawlessly in their backlit applications. The thickness (7 mil), tear-resistance and transparency of both media perform equally, with the greatest difference being cost. Our backlit posters are also coated with an optically clear 3-mil matte PVC laminate that makes your posters water and scratch-resistant while increasing their lifespan and usability.

Think it will work? ^^^

#34 5 years ago
Quoted from Prmailers:

I think you might be on to something there pafasa.
I think as long as your mask is opaque enough, and both pieces register properly it will look awesome.

Even though I sold Klondike, I am going to continue with this project. I think it will work great. Registering the two layers is no issue at all. Hope to have it done soon.

#35 5 years ago
Quoted from Pin-it:

http://www.backlitposters.com/duratrans.html#faq < Read for pricing)
Backlit Posters' DuraTrans utilizes state-of-the-art large format inkjet printers to produce stunning backlit media that easily rival the quality of the Eastman Kodaks brand of DuraTrans at a fraction of the price. Our backlit prints are produced at 1440 dpi for photographic quality images that display flawlessly in their backlit applications. The thickness (7 mil), tear-resistance and transparency of both media perform equally, with the greatest difference being cost. Our backlit posters are also coated with an optically clear 3-mil matte PVC laminate that makes your posters water and scratch-resistant while increasing their lifespan and usability.
Think it will work? ^^^

There's no doubt in my mind that this will work for translites. You would still need a second layer of some kind to replace the aluminum masking on a backglass. Maybe if a person were to scan and print the aluminum side and make a stencil, they could use light blocking paint from the hardware store.

3 weeks later
#36 5 years ago
Quoted from jukehero1:

But if the artwork looks fine with the lights off then you spend the money and do a translite.The Blackout translite in the pix above cost me $50 from GameonGrafix and the colors blazing out of that translite make that factory Eightball backglass look dull in comparison.

The GameonGrafix web site says "Please do not upload scans of Original Reproduction pinballs. We can not print them, sorry."

If I send them a PhotoShop of my Gottlieb Sure Shot backglass, will they print it?

#37 5 years ago

I didn't have any problems.I made sure to edit out anything that said "Copyright" on the scan though.Also if it's something that nobody is reproducing I doubt anyone will care.You are not selling them you are just trying to restore your own machine,right?

#38 5 years ago

I've taken two of these to York.
It's a lot of work.
It's not cheap.
But a every pinball must have a backglass.

This GC stole from a friend of mine so I wouldn't deal w/em.

5 years later
#39 9 days ago

Printing e m pinball backglass art lining up score Wheels

wms_darling2 (resized).jpg
#40 9 days ago

How do I make sure the score wheels are lined up when I have this picture blown up and print it on paper

#41 9 days ago

cut out the windows and hold it up to the backboard

#42 9 days ago

What's a good DPI size cuz I'm going to edit this picture in Photoshop to the right DPI size

#43 9 days ago

Why does the image say Jubilee bottom center? Also, 1, 2, 3, 4 can play spot lights is not right on a Two Player machine like Darling.

#44 9 days ago
Quoted from Randy55:

What's a good DPI size cuz I'm going to edit this picture in Photoshop to the right DPI size

Screenprinting yields a resolution of 200-300 DPI, so working with the latter in Photoshop should suffice.

#45 9 days ago

I'm guessing the image was "borrowed" from the BGResto website. 72 dpi at 9" x 8" isn't going to give you the results you're hoping for. You can always scale down from a higher resolution but going the other way isn't going to work.

#46 9 days ago
Quoted from AlexF:

I'm guessing the image was "borrowed" from the BGResto website. 72 dpi at 9" x 8" isn't going to give you the results your hoping for. You can't always scale down from a higher resolution but going the other way isn't going to work.

If Bgresto have spent the time and done the art why not get it from Steve?

#47 8 days ago

I have had a few backglasses done at bgresto. It was about 4 years ago but my experience was great! There is a lot that goes into making your own. Probably more than you might expect. I tried to make my own in the past. Getting the art ready was extremely time consuming. Fun, but only if you you have the time. Steve at BGResto is a definite good option for a reproduction.

#48 8 days ago

I just received a BG Resto glass from Steve for Hokus Pokus. It is beautiful. Earlier in the summer did my own for Triple Action and not nearly as nice, but Steve didn't have TA artwork and I had no glass to send him. In the case of Hokus Pokus, I got the machine cheap enough, that still would make a couple of bucks if decided to sell it. So one of the decisions is whether the game is worth the cost of a good reproduction glass, or whether you don't care if you are upside down in the machine because you are going to keep it.

Oh, and Randy, lining up the score reels, credit window, and all the ball count and match numbers and lights was a real challenge on the TA backglass. We printed several full size white papers with just the numbers, and outlines for windows to put into the back box, then noted corrections, then did it again until everything matched correctly. Then cut the numbers and windows out of black sign vinyl and applied to the back side of the image to create the black out areas and numbers. Would do it again if needed, but not fun.

#49 8 days ago

I have contacted them via email but I have gotten no response that's what I have tried to do contact people companies to see if they have a file from when they restored one cuz mine is pretty bad off I rather get a translite made but nobody has the file if you could help me find one that would be great point me in the right direction that would be great thank you very much as you can see mine is pretty bad

15417093050621709040181 (resized).jpg
#50 8 days ago

I have to go to work so I'll get back with you guys a little later here's my email if you find something you can send it to me thank you very much. Rgeller56@gmail.com..

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