(Topic ID: 252544)

Changing a Euro plug cord to US (not in Vid’s guide)


By drsfmd

9 months ago



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  • 36 posts
  • 7 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 9 months ago by Dent00
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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#1 9 months ago

Working on a Playmatic game with a Euro plug. The game has already had the transformer connected to the 110 lugs, so the voltage itself isn’t an issue. Instead of using an adapter, I want to swap out the cable for a US one. My problem is that the Euro plug has two prongs, but there are three wires attached to the transformer. I’m not sure what to connect to what... anybody done this before?

#2 9 months ago
Quoted from drsfmd:

Working on a Playmatic game with a Euro plug. The game has already had the transformer connected to the 110 lugs, so the voltage itself isn’t an issue. Instead of using an adapter, I want to swap out the cable for a US one. My problem is that the Euro plug has two prongs, but there are three wires attached to the transformer. I’m not sure what to connect to what... anybody done this before?

Just google International Wiring colours and see what you have.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_wiring

Euro (and NZ and Au) is:

Phase (Hot) - brown. (USA = black)

Neutral- blue (USA = white)

Earth - green

Remember - Green is always earth. That is likely what you are missing.

That should run to all the earth braiding around the machine.

rd

#3 9 months ago

But there are only two prongs on the plug, so how is it grounded?

#4 9 months ago
Quoted from drsfmd:

But there are only two prongs on the plug, so how is it grounded?

It’s currently not.

Which is stupid.

Half the pins I’ve bought from the states have had the ground pin cut off. Shocking.

rd

#5 9 months ago
Quoted from rotordave:

It’s currently not.
Which is stupid.
Half the pins I’ve bought from the states have had the ground pin cut off. Shocking.

rd

I don’t even see a place where the grounding pin should be. Remember, I’m trying to go from a two prong Euro to a three prong US.

I’ve got this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europlug

I’m trying to go to this: https://pediaa.com/difference-between-neutral-and-ground/

The euro plug has only two pins, but there are three wires inside the cable that connects to the transformer.

#6 9 months ago
Quoted from drsfmd:

I don’t even see a place where the grounding pin should be. Remember, I’m trying to go from a two prong Euro to a three prong US.

You're cutting off the Euro and replacing it, or replacing the whole cable. You're not concerned with how a Euro plug is grounded because you won't have one one your game.

Where the power cord comes into the game and gets opened up what color are the wires and where are they currently connected?

#7 9 months ago

Don’t worry about the current cord ... note the colours, and where they go, and bin it!

Buy a 10ft US 3 pin extension cord, cut the extension plug off the end of it, and wire that in there.

I do that to every pin I import. Extension cord = A new cord and a new molded plug. Winner.

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#8 9 months ago

I took another look at it this morning. There *is* a ground on the existing plug- those two little notches have metal blades in them, and there's continuity from the blade to the ground. I feel a little silly having missed that last night.

Looks like it will be pretty straightforward from here... thanks for your help gents!

Edit: And yes, I'm going to clean those contacts well before installing the new cord. I'm thinking I should remove those little rusty buss bar style connectors, and wire it directly.

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#10 9 months ago

Yup- thanks. It didn't cover the initial question of what thought was an ungrounded Euro plug.

#11 9 months ago

Yep, your picture shows the standard euro colours, as per my post above.

rd

#12 9 months ago
Quoted from drsfmd:

I took another look at it this morning. There *is* a ground on the existing plug- those two little notches have metal blades in them, and there's continuity from the blade to the ground. I feel a little silly having missed that last night.
Looks like it will be pretty straightforward from here... thanks for your help gents!
Edit: And yes, I'm going to clean those contacts well before installing the new cord. I'm thinking I should remove those little rusty buss bar style connectors, and wire it directly.
[quoted image][quoted image]

Glad to see your working on it! I really hope you get it going. Can’t wait to see how it plays!

#13 9 months ago
Quoted from Isochronic_Frost:

Glad to see your working on it! I really hope you get it going. Can’t wait to see how it plays!

Yeah, I couldn't bear to see it sitting there without at least attempting to get it running.

#14 9 months ago

Be careful here... Most of these IEC plugs like this in Asia or Europe use 250V, 50Hz supply.
So, if your machine transformer is set up for 250V, 50Hz and you energize at 120V, 60Hz, not sure what the results might be.
Check the nameplate or ratings on things before you turn that baby on.
Just my 2 cents...
You can purchase a universal travel converter that might carry your machine with the normal 120V outlet voltage.
There are many varieties and brands of these available at different prices and shapes, but here is one:
amazon.com link »
Edit here: this one will not work because it is designed to plug into 250V outlet and energize 120V devices.
Your machine could be a 250V device, so this converter is not appropriate, I don't think.. But you get the idea...

#15 9 months ago
Quoted from Dent00:

Be careful here... Most of these IEC plugs like this in Asia or Europe use 250V, 50Hz supply.
So, if your machine transformer is set up for 250V, 50Hz and you energize at 120V, 60Hz, not sure what the results might be.
Check the nameplate or ratings on things before you turn that baby on.
Just my 2 cents...
You can purchase a universal travel converter that might carry your machine with the normal 120V outlet voltage.
There are many varieties and brands of these available at different prices and shapes, but here is one:
amazon.com link »
Edit here: this one will not work because it is designed to plug into 250V outlet and energize 120V devices.
Your machine could be a 250V device, so this converter is not appropriate, I don't think.. But you get the idea...

Hadn't thought of that-- though a prior owner had the machine plugged in and booting using a plug adapter. There are 120V lugs on the transformer. I'll post another picture when I get home. I can also disconnect all of the jones plugs and test the output of the transformer before reconnecting anything.

#16 9 months ago

This thread happens to be on the same subject, with someone helping out a prior owner of this very same machine...

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/playmatic-ss-transformer-general-tech-help-last-lap

#17 9 months ago

It appears, based on the schematic in the link provided above that you can relocate the red-green wire to the 125 Volt tap on the transformer and run the machine on 120V. Note that there is still a courtesy plug shown on that schematic that would still be energized at 225 Volts, unless the tap for that plug is also moved on the transformer on a yellow-blue wire. I would advise extreme caution in all of this and fuse everything prior to energizing. Especially, if the previous owner has already made some adjustments here, that just makes things more interesting. Just be careful and don't have a shocking experience. I hate it when the smoke is released.

#18 9 months ago

Ok. I pulled the transformer. There isn’t a red/green wire, but there’s only one red wire- so it appears that this may have already been done.

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#19 9 months ago

Perhaps it used to be red/green and you can't see the green stripe anymore.
Looks to me like you are right... Someone already adjusted this wiring...
I see 3 blue wires under that lug... Perhaps one of those goes to the convenience outlet.
I would check that wiring and check voltage at your convenience outlet also before plugging anything in there.
Also, be aware that other taps on this transformer not being used are still energized up to the 230V tap.
So, some of those exposed wires could be the energized taps on the transformer that are no longer used and they appear ready to be touched.
I would tape those or cover with wire nuts to avoid any issues where someone accidently touches that or drops something on those.
This kind of thing scares me, cause I don't like getting shocked without it being on purpose.

#20 9 months ago

On 2nd thought, that red/green wire is likely the 230 Volt tap on the transformer.
This whole thing scares me, cause it just looks nasty...
I cant really see all the wiring or all of the schematic, so I still advise major caution.

#21 9 months ago

I’m going to install the new cord, and test the output of the transformer. I’m also going to tape, then heat shrink tube all of the exposed tips. Photos to follow in a bit.

#22 9 months ago

Upon further review of that schematic, there is a red wire shown on the low side of the transformer to a mid point on a 32 Volt AC circuit for something that has several connections shown. It appears to be on the 30 Volt tap. So perhaps that red wire is not the original red-green wire to the 230 Volt tap.

#23 9 months ago

One other thing I noticed is that this 230 Volt circuit is depicted with a 6 amp fuse in it on the schematic provided.
So if this machine is now operated at 120 Volt, it is possible that fuse might need to be little larger.
Maybe like 230/120*6 which is 11.5 Amps... Maybe a 10 Amp fuse would be sufficient.
Perhaps that has also already been replaced. But, I would suggest that you check that...

#24 9 months ago

So it looks like the transformer was wired up correctly. I capped off all of those bare ends with tape, and shrink wrapped over them. Then I installed the new power cord (without any issues). From the schematic it looked like the service jack was on all the time, so I took a gamble and plugged it in to see what the reading was at the service jack- it was 120v!

Without the playfield in, I turned the game on- I’ve got some GI (lots of bulbs out- some others came on when I wiggled the bulbs, so there are some bad contacts to deal with) and a couple of the displays came on. I’ll put the playfield back in this weekend. Some of the Jones plugs are in very bad shape... so it looks like there will be a lot of soldering and cleaning in my future.

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#25 9 months ago

Nice work... That sure looks a lot better... Glad nothing exploded and no one got hurt. Now you can work on small things that don't normally cause major problems. You know... lights, coils, plastic, rubber, all that good stuff. Good luck with all those Jones plugs on that machine. Those can really be a pain sometimes...

#26 9 months ago

The schematic probably calls for an 8 amp/250v main fuse if it lists one at all. 5a is enough for most EMs. Stick with 250v. Pinball Life has them 45 cents each.
https://www.pinballlife.com/1-14-fast-blow-fuses.html
Doubtful the main will be a slo-blo but check the schematic.

#27 9 months ago
Quoted from YeOldPinPlayer:

The schematic probably calls for an 8 amp/250v main fuse if it lists one at all. 5a is enough for most EMs. Stick with 250v. Pinball Life has them 45 cents each.
https://www.pinballlife.com/1-14-fast-blow-fuses.html
Doubtful the main will be a slo-blo but check the schematic.

It’s a standard 6A on the schematic, and that’s what is in the machine. The game is an early SS, not an EM.

#28 9 months ago

I really hope that you can make this game, "Last Lap", work... I watched some of the video archive gameplay on this machine and it is very unique. Some of the advertisements are in espanole'. Good luck getting original parts for that... The sound was tones like beeps and boops. Seemed to play fairly fast too. Should be fun if you can make all that work. I don't think I have seen another similar game, but I also never been to Spain and played pinball there.

#29 9 months ago

I hope so too. The playfield is immaculate. This weekend in going to clean and repair all the Jones plugs. Then I start reflowing the connectors on the boards.

#30 9 months ago

Not meaning to hijack thread... but those Jones Plugs.
Does anybody know if there very many variations out there?
The ones in the photo's are 2x6's.

And does anybody know why these are called Jones Plugs? The rest of the world outside of pinball know that Jones Plugs are flat bladed connectors which look nothing like these.

#31 9 months ago
Quoted from G-P-E:

Not meaning to hijack thread... but those Jones Plugs.
Does anybody know if there very many variations out there?
The ones in the photo's are 2x6's.
And does anybody know why these are called Jones Plugs? The rest of the world outside of pinball know that Jones Plugs are flat bladed connectors which look nothing like these.

Last Lap has a few different sizes. There were two massive ones that are for the playfield which are like 20 pins I think.

#32 9 months ago
Quoted from G-P-E:

Not meaning to hijack thread... but those Jones Plugs.
Does anybody know if there very many variations out there?
The ones in the photo's are 2x6's.
And does anybody know why these are called Jones Plugs? The rest of the world outside of pinball know that Jones Plugs are flat bladed connectors which look nothing like these.

They come in all sorts of sizes. In my various games I've seen everything from 2 to 24 pins on a single plug. There are variations amongst manufacturers too... the pins on the male ends are different lengths, and there are a couple of different designs for the female ends.

No idea where the name comes from- that's what I've always heard them called.

#33 9 months ago

As a Brit, currently an EU Citizen for at least a few days - I can clear up a little of the confusion on the two pin EU plugs, as we have these all the while arriving on EU imports and in the UK we use 13A, square pin connectors, so get used to adaptors.

The EU plugs come in two main styles. The female connectors on the wall outlets are usually a Schuko design - so they are recessed, and the connector you have seen in the picture with the ground(UK speak Earth) slots fit in and are then a 3 circuit connection - our live, neutral and earth. EU colours are always green/yellow stripe for ground/earth, blue for neutral and brown for live. Our phase to neutral voltage is 240V in the UK and 220V in the rest of EU. It's often written as 230V to cover both, and the 20V makes no difference at all. However - US folk often bring their electrical items here and I can confirm that two things happen when plugged in here - it works fine (because so much nowadays uses switch mode power supplies, so is happy anywhere between 100 and 250 or so, but older transformer gear usually goes bang straight away, or the transformer fails in just a few seconds.

Another oddity here is that while you may see mains cables with moulded Shuko 2 pin and the side ground variety you also see the figure 8, 2 conductor connector wired to a 2 pin euro plug that does not have the side ground. These will fit in the recessed wall outlets happily, either way around.

In the UK all 2 conductor connectors require the appliance to be double insulated - because shocks here with 240V are more impressive. We don't have 'code' like you have in the US, but a 3 core appliance with a safety ground cannot be legally connected to an adaptor with the ground lifted. Illegal, but sadly done quite often.

In Europe/UK, the colours mentioned above are the only acceptable ones. All the pinballs I have seen since the 70s have used the higher voltage taps on the transformers, and had the UK wiring colours between transformer and wall outlet. One warning is that while we are now on Brown-live, Blue-neutral and green/yellow-earth, Pinballs from the 70s/80s may still have our old wiring colours - Red-live, Black-neutral and green-earth.

#34 9 months ago

interesting... Schuko... Hadn't heard that term for those recessed plugs... In the USA we are governed by the NEC (National Electrical Code). Most devices require a 3 prong plug, with a ground lead on the 3rd prong. If a ground is not required, a 2 prong plug is acceptable. We have a few other plugs for large load devices, like a stove or dryer, but they are normally used only for larger loads, like a trailer, or mobile home. A lot of Americans might never see Euro plugs, unless they are exposed to IEC code or travel internationally. So, a plug like this from Europe is unfamiliar to most Americans and it definitely will not fit a normal outlet here without an adapter. USA also has all 60Hz devices in all 50 states, like clocks, motors, etc, etc, so 50Hz is not on our radar either. Also, thanks for the color code info. That might come in handy one day...

#35 9 months ago

Dang. Cleaned up the home plug pins and sockets. Plugged it in... both fuses on the mpu blow immediately. I’ll unplug things from the mpu tomorrow, and see what plug is causing it, and trace backwards from there.

Hopefully it’s only a minor setback.

#36 9 months ago

I guess you will need to get that multimeter back out. I suppose that you have to expect some issues on a machine made during this time frame. I would be willing to bet that the problem has something having to do with those Jones plugs.

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