(Topic ID: 79956)

Cement Paint for Basement Gameroom


By dieseldogpi

5 years ago



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  • 30 posts
  • 19 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by Pinfidel
  • Topic is favorited by 5 Pinsiders

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    #1 5 years ago

    Figured I would see what people have used to paint a cement floor for a gameroom. I have to do paint because it is an area where my dumb dogs (3, 2 of which are over 100lbs) hang out, so carpet is out of the question. I was thinking the Rust-Oleum Epoxy paint like the one in the link.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-EpoxyShield-2-gal-Gray-High-Gloss-2-Part-Epoxy-Garage-Floor-Coating-Kit-251870/100671422?N=5yc1vZbd13

    This is water based epoxy, is that not good, should I look for oil based? Any thoughts for alternatives welcome. I'm looking to keep it relatively cheap because this is not forever home, and ultimately, the rest of the room will not be finished (still have washer and dryer in a corner, etc.).

    #2 5 years ago

    I used some basement paint from Home Depot....came in a regular paint can and you could select from a bunch of colors (I don't think it was Behr but I can't remember)......10 years later, the paint is still looking pretty good

    #3 5 years ago

    Look into Rust-Oleum EpoxyShield 2-Part Epoxy Garage Floor Coating Kit

    #4 5 years ago
    Quoted from Max_Badazz:

    I used some basement paint from Home Depot....came in a regular paint can and you could select from a bunch of colors (I don't think it was Behr but I can't remember)......10 years later, the paint is still looking pretty good

    Its not Epoxy? You have pins on it? Spills?

    Quoted from meSz:

    Look into Rust-Oleum EpoxyShield 2-Part Epoxy Garage Floor Coating Kit

    Thinking of this as well

    #5 5 years ago

    I don't remember if it was epoxy, but it was a Home Depot basement paint (not a garage kit)...... I've had a bar with stools, pool table, arcade games, a couch, and lots of pins over the years on it. Holds up fairly well.

    #6 5 years ago
    Quoted from dieseldogpi:

    Figured I would see what people have used to paint a cement floor for a gameroom. I have to do paint because it is an area where my dumb dogs (3, 2 of which are over 100lbs) hang out, so carpet is out of the question. I was thinking the Rust-Oleum Epoxy paint like the one in the link.
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-EpoxyShield-2-gal-Gray-High-Gloss-2-Part-Epoxy-Garage-Floor-Coating-Kit-251870/100671422?N=5yc1vZbd13
    This is water based epoxy, is that not good, should I look for oil based? Any thoughts for alternatives welcome. I'm looking to keep it relatively cheap because this is not forever home, and ultimately, the rest of the room will not be finished (still have washer and dryer in a corner, etc.).

    I used the exact same stuff on my basement floor when I had my Great Danes for the exact same reason. That stuff even comes with a few colored sprinkles to even give the floor some texture. It is great stuff, easy to clean up spills, and doesn't look too bad. Very durable too....

    The key is good prep. It has instructions for prep, and it has about a 3 day setup time before use, but totally worth it. When they passed, I eventually laid carpet over it.

    #7 5 years ago
    Quoted from Max_Badazz:

    I don't remember if it was epoxy, but it was a Home Depot basement paint (not a garage kit)...... I've had a bar with stools, pool table, arcade games, a couch, and lots of pins over the years on it. Holds up fairly well.

    What about prep, do you remember what kind of prep. this is an older basement floor, I am having a restoration company come in to do a professional cleaning on it since my dogs have done a number on it over the years. I might have to patch some spots as well.

    #8 5 years ago
    Quoted from dieseldogpi:

    What about prep, do you remember what kind of prep. this is an older basement floor, I am having a restoration company come in to do a professional cleaning on it since my dogs have done a number on it over the years. I might have to patch some spots as well.

    Going from memory, we did a thorough cleaning with a muratic acid solution, water, and a stiff bristle brush. Again, I remember there being specific instructions in the kit, just don't remember them, as it has been about 10 years.

    #9 5 years ago
    Quoted from ralphwiggum:

    Going from memory, we did a thorough cleaning with a muratic acid solution, water, and a stiff bristle brush. Again, I remember there being specific instructions in the kit, just don't remember them, as it has been about 10 years.

    Yep. A floor coating is only as good as the substrate you apply it to. Muratic acid dilution (wear protection), stiff bristle brush, neutralize and rinse. You can go one step further a scrub it again with tsp, rinse and the most important part, let it dry completely.

    #10 5 years ago

    To suit your needs I would recommend epoxy or polyaspartic (sparta coat). I do decorative concrete so like the others have said prep is absolutely critical. If you cannot mechanically grind the surface muratic acid can work. Look to your local concrete supply house as opposed to home depot for this.

    #11 5 years ago

    I used the stuff you are looking at. Mine is tan with brown colored sprinkles. I washed the floor twice, to get all of the dust and dirt off, filled a small cracks and painted. It has held up well for a few years now. I didn't do the acid wash, as my floor was slightly rough (not the usual smooth and shiny concrete). The sprinkles hide the imperfections in the floor. They take a little practice to get a uniform look, but I found that if I made a mistake I could lay on another coat of paint in that area and spread again.

    I put a cocktail table in place too early after I finished. When I moved it almost a year later, it took some paint off of the floor. I touched it up, sprinkled, and you can't tell there was ever a problem.

    Good stuff in my book.

    #12 5 years ago
    Quoted from dieseldogpi:

    What about prep, do you remember what kind of prep. this is an older basement floor, I am having a restoration company come in to do a professional cleaning on it since my dogs have done a number on it over the years. I might have to patch some spots as well.

    I had to wash it with some solution, scrub it, and rinse......then apply the paint when it was 100% dry (used a dehumidifier). They have all the details on the paint instructions

    #13 5 years ago

    Here is another option. H&C concrete stain is a great product and would be great for this application. Epoxy systems are awesome but do require precise prep and tend to be expensive if done correctly. If cost is in mind this would be a great solution to your problem. We use H&C concrete stains commercially on everything from parking garages to exterior concretes and basement floors. You can get it in about any color and goes on just like paint, just a little thinner. The product should be available at your local Sherwin Williams . As far as prep goes we power wash with tsp and scrub if possible and if not sweep and vacuum. Hopefully the floor has a some profile which is ideal for adhesion. I have never had warranty issue yet with their product. Good Luck!

    #14 5 years ago

    I recommend "rock solid garage floor coatings". It is a polyurea, and tougher than hell. It is however, more difficult to work with and clean up consists of you throwing away the application materials Biggest down side is the cost at roughly $0.50 sq ft.

    #15 5 years ago

    I agree with epoxy and as others have said and it cannot be overstated. WATER is your enemy. It must be completey dry. Water vapor will cause the epoxy to release from the surface!

    #16 5 years ago

    I am not a big fan of epoxy. It is dated and looks like a mechanics garage. The new thing to do with concrete is staining with an acid based product and then a sealer with sheen. The color patterns look amazing. All of the commercial restaurants are doing this along with million dollar homes. It is relatively cheap and the end product is really nice. Good Luck

    stained concrete.jpg concrete stain2.jpg Concrete stain application.jpg
    #17 5 years ago

    Most basement floors are smooth and sometimes shiny concrete which offers little for the paint to adhere too. The use of muratic acid etches the surface giving the paint a surface to stick too. BTW, a lot of the garage epoxy's give off terrible odors while curing........

    #18 5 years ago

    Pinmister - I love that look too! Stained and sealer is the way I will be going. Looks industrial to me, which is the look I want to go for.

    Muratic acid is available for cheap at Home Depot. Look in the swimming pool chemical section. They sell it by the 2 gallon box.

    Quoted from limbo76:

    We use H&C concrete stains commercially on everything from parking garages to exterior concretes and basement floors. You can get it in about any color and goes on just like paint, just a little thinner. The product should be available at your local Sherwin Williams .

    Thanks for the lead! I will be checking that out!

    #19 5 years ago

    That laminate 'hardwood' flooring is almost indestructible...and made for below grade. Lumber liquidators usually has it on sale for $.49 a SQ FT. I used it at my last house in the basement when I had a couple dogs. Never scratched and real easy to install. Might be worth a look

    #20 5 years ago

    Stain system - http://www.increte.com/ ------- Very bad idea for your application
    Spartan coating (polyaspartic) http://www.spartan-concrete-coatings.com/examples.htm--------- Good option
    Epoxy http://elitecrete.com/?gclid=CIDgkZjevLwCFQHNOgodC1gAwg -------- Good option
    Polished concrete http://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete/polishing/?gclid=CNKQ2MHevLwCFTHNOgodsUEA5A ------Not economical

    Restaurants and high end homes were using stains 10 years ago. They have since moved away from this due to the softer acrylic sealers not holding up the test of time. 5 or so years ago the move was made more towards polished concrete and this is still the application of choice by restaurants, homes, and big box stores. The big box stores use a very cheap version of polished concrete.

    Again you need tougher than normal abrasion resistance Epoxy or polyaspartic are your best options if you want this to last and look good for more than a few years. Ohh using acid stain you will need to re-seal every other year at least and the fumes will clear you from your house for a day or so.

    Good luck!
    Rock

    #21 5 years ago

    I prefer the acid staining - otherwise a good concert paint, I got mine from a paint dealer (but you have to 'etch' it first with something). When I did my basement floor I got some kind of enchant/cleaner from the paint supplier was was more user friendly (vs. muratic acid) - sorry I don't recall what it was as this was several years ago. The paint is holding up really well, but this is only in our 'mechanical' room so it doesn't really see a lot of traffic.

    Muratic acid works, but the smell/fumes are really nasty in an enclosed area (hell, even outdoors it is bad if you catch a whiff of it) - you will need to wear a respirator.

    I would never do epoxy again. I had it done in the garage and it is a real pain and never again (used a commercial grade epoxy coating too). It does clean up easy but it scratches and chips way too easy. The chips eventually turn into bigger and bigger areas unless filled right after the chip develops (which means keeping spare unmixed epoxy handy). Also discovered never under any circumstances roll anything over the floor that weighs more than 100 lbs on steel castors as it literally destroys the epoxy coating (the castors cracks it, which will cause it to lift in the area). It is also extremely slippery when wet (even with the color chips in it) - maybe not so much of an issue in the basement. Plus a whole lot of other assorted issues that occur when parking a car on it which is not relevant to this discussion. So many problem from it that the manufacturer ended up giving me my money back (in hind site I should have had them remove it as well as it looks like hell now - only 5 years old).

    #22 5 years ago
    Quoted from limbo76:

    Here is another option. H&C concrete stain is a great product and would be great for this application. Epoxy systems are awesome but do require precise prep and tend to be expensive if done correctly. If cost is in mind this would be a great solution to your problem. We use H&C concrete stains commercially on everything from parking garages to exterior concretes and basement floors. You can get it in about any color and goes on just like paint, just a little thinner. The product should be available at your local Sherwin Williams . As far as prep goes we power wash with tsp and scrub if possible and if not sweep and vacuum. Hopefully the floor has a some profile which is ideal for adhesion. I have never had warranty issue yet with their product. Good Luck!

    Agreed. I used the epoxy from Home Depot and it peels pretty bad. I prepped it but my garage floor was new and probably too smooth to be painted. I wish I had just stained it.

    #23 5 years ago

    Hmm, now I'm not sure as some people are saying the staining doesn't hold up. My real goal is to seal the floor so if there is a spill, it doesn't seem into the concrete, looking decent is an added bonus.

    #24 5 years ago

    My parents did a stamped concrete coat that was pretty cheap and looks just like expensive tile, with gout lines and all.

    #25 5 years ago

    I stained mine with 3 different colors applied with spray bottles. It's cheap & covers the floor, gives it a splatter look. If it wears away I just spray it again.

    #26 5 years ago

    H&C while called a stain, is a waterborne product that merely penetrates the uppermost layer and will wear poorly. Chemical (acid) stains such as LM Scofield actually etch/stain the soft parts of the concrete makeup. Most new Resturant construction jobs stain the concete a different way. They use a stain admixture to the concrete mix before the pour so the stain is throughout the mix an wears more evenly. Forget polished concrete unless you have deep pockets. To have polished concrete your looking at $10-15 per sf.

    #27 5 years ago
    Quoted from dieseldogpi:

    Hmm, now I'm not sure as some people are saying the staining doesn't hold up. My real goal is to seal the floor so if there is a spill, it doesn't seem into the concrete, looking decent is an added bonus.

    As long as you follow the instructions to the T you should be okay. Prepping properly is very critical.

    #28 5 years ago

    The most important thing is the prep. Make sure you clean your floor really well. Then you need to acid etch it. That helps the paint to get in there and bind better to the cement.

    Remember, this is a floor. It is going to take some serious and heavy abuse. The walking, rolling of machines, the dogs etc. etc. So, it's going to chip here and there. It's inevitable.

    That said, there's 2 ways you can go. The first is with an epoxy. Now their are 2 types of epoxy. The oil based or water based. They are always in 2 part form. The A part which is the paint and the B part which is the catalyst.

    The best epoxy is the oil based type. I forget the name and it's killing me. But this is EXTREMLY strong odorous stuff and I don't think you should use it in your home. We referred to it as the A B Bomb because It will clear out a building with the smell and make you dizzy and sick. You need a good quality respirator when you use this too. You don't want to breath this in. Trust me, I know. LOL You even need Methyl Ethyl Keytone (MEK Highly toxic solvent) just to clean up with. This type of epoxy is used in the locker rooms of all the Pro and College stadiums as well as some high schools. When it dries, it looks and feels like tile. It's so thick and strong.

    The second type of epoxy is the water based. That's also an A B - 2 part system, but a lot less toxic. If you choose this, wear a good mask and open all the windows to air it out. A fan is a good thing to use as well to circulate the air. You should use one no matter what paint you use. It has about a 60 - 90 minute pot life before it starts to harden on you. It will dry well in about 8 hours but needs about 72 hours to fully cure. It's very durable too. Will it chip? Yes, it's paint, but, you can always take and mix some more as needed and do touch ups. You'll see a little sheen difference when the touch up dries of course, but it will fade and blend with time. You could rough it up lightly with a green scrungy pad. Not hard to scratch it all up, but just to dull the sheen a little bit. This is the way I myself would go if I were to paint.

    The second way you could go would be to use what they use for spray in truck bed liner. We did this at work and it holds up awesome. Vehicles driving over it as well as tool carts and heavy equipment. This is expensive stuff, but if money weren't an issue, I'd definitely use this.

    The product we used was called Raptor. It is a 2 part epoxy based rubberized coating. The rubber is what makes it so durable. It gives it some flex and resistance. It also dries flat so that you can touch it up at will and you don't really notice what was redone. You can even add sand to it for gripiness if needed. Same goes for the epoxies and I highly recommend that you use a sand in the paint because if it gets wet and you hit it without noticing it, you could easily take a Dixie and really hurt yourself on that hard non forgiving cement.

    I will say this, this may be a great option for you. I thought of it while typing. Check out this link. I almost used this in my finished basement with its concrete floor. it's high strength plastic snap locking flooring that simply clicks together. And if a piece gets ruined, you just pull it out and snap in a brand new piece. Pretty cool stuff and a few different companies make it in a wide array of colors, textures, and designs, including carpet style. Definitely give this a look see. I think this is a better alternative to paint myself and a lot less labor intensive.

    Me, I ended up using faux wood looking rubber gym flooring. My wife works out down there so it gives here extra cushion, and it looks really cool. It's a simple jigsaw puzzle pattern and installing it is a BREEZE! You simply cut it with a nice sharp razor blade. They come in all different colors including different faux wood types. We went with the light wood look. We're very happy with it. It will leave an indent if you have a heavy object on it. So if you have something on it, then move it to another place after it's been there for a little while, it will leave that imprint. BUT, you can simply pull out the affected piece and install a new one. Then your good as new again.

    Here's a link for that.

    Anyway, if you have your heart set on painting it. I strongly suggest you go to Sherwin Williams. They'll help to steer you in the right direction as far as product, price and process.

    No matter which way you go, good luck and I hope this helped.

    Derek.

    #29 5 years ago
    Quoted from Pinfidel:

    The most important thing is the prep. Make sure you clean your floor really well. Then you need to acid etch it. That helps the paint to get in there and........

    The bed liner stuff isn't a bad idea. I had done the bottom of an old jeep of mine in it, used a paint sprayer with a big gauge nozzle turned out great. I just feel like it will be a lot more work than the epoxy and might not be as durable as most of the lining paints have a definite texture (chunky rubber), and I would think moving a machine around on it would snag this rubber and rip the paint. I expect some wear, I just don't want to be touching up constantly.

    If the dogs were out of the picture, I would consider those plastic snap locking pieces, or carpet or whatever. I just worry about spills or dog accidents.

    As far as prepping, I am actually having a restoration company come in today to clean all of the cement, floor and the partial walls (walls go up to my shoulders). Once it is clean, no dogs allowed until I complete everything. Plan on giving it a couple of days to dry, then hope to paint or stain this weekend. At this point I think I am leaning towards epoxy paint. I also want to coat the partial walls as well. I don't plan on doing a total finishing job with sheet rock etc, and the walls get just as dirty from these dogs as the floor. I don't think staining would work well for rough walls. Wonder what the thought is about putting pads or something under the pin legs so the damage will be minimal from nudging/moving.

    #30 5 years ago

    You can call the company that makes the Raptor liner because they sell it in 5 gallon barrels that way. You don't spray it on. You mix it and cut the room in. Then you roll it on the floor right of the bucket. You'll get the roller texture and that helps with the grip. If you want extra grip you can add sand. When we did this on our work floors we didn't use sand on the whole floor, just at the entrances for extra grip with how wet it get from a thousand guys walking in and out when it rains or snows. The rest of the floor was straight product.

    This paint has held up unbelievably. 20 ton trucks and busses ride across it. Mechanics and machinists drag 1000lb tool carriers across it and tons of other stuff. It has held up through all that. Some spots have chipped here and there and when it does, we just mix a little and then take a small 4" or 6" roller and pour the stuff on the floor and roll it out.

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