(Topic ID: 142768)

Capacitor and Resistor Question


By Joker2415

5 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 11 posts
  • 5 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by Joker2415
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    #1 5 years ago

    While working on and experimenting with my new found pinball hobby, trying to figure out what each part is doing on my boards and why, I was thinking.........This might be another dumb question for some of you guys! I'm trying to teach myself and was wondering why you can use a higher voltage rated cap. As an example, instead of a 35 volt 100 mf a higher voltage 50volt is Ok. I read a lot of articles saying it's fine to use higher voltage rated caps, but I haven't been able to find out why? What does it change? (if anything) where is the % limit, how big is too big? If there is no difference ,then why all the different voltages? Why, not just 100 volt or higher for everything? Can someone lay this out for me in half dummy terms? Or point me in a direction of something that explains this.

    Also, why not just use 1% resistors on everything? Is it a waste, would it help? Was it originally a cost issue in the assembly line, and the 5%, 10% were cheaper. Or is there some other reason that you would actually want a 5% 0r 10%?

    I know this stuff might be basic, but these questions might help someone else that is trying to learn and might be curious. I can somewhat read a schematic and can swap parts, but I want to know why, and what that part is doing.

    Again, I don't know enough....to know!

    Sry, if these are newbie repeat questions!

    #2 5 years ago

    The circuit that the capacitor is in will only charge it to a certain voltage. So you can usually use a higher voltage and have extra capacity. Even though it's not being used.
    Unless the circuit needs low esr. Then adding a higher voltage may mean higher esr too.

    Lower tolerance resistors are cheaper. Pull up resistors for example don't need to be an exact value. Close enough will do.
    An expensive analogue amplifier will have high persision resistors. On filters and transistor resistors.

    #3 5 years ago

    Cost drives most of it. 100V caps are generally more expensive than 35V caps. Same goes for resistor tolerances. Even though they are cheap parts individually, they can really add up in the long run when you're talking production volumes.

    Higher voltage caps don't change much other than what they're rated for. For example, you can get really nice tires for your car rated up to 170 MPH, but they're going to have a similar performance as 100 MPH tires if you're always driving the speed limit (generically speaking).

    #4 5 years ago
    Quoted from SoundUser:

    The circuit that the capacitor is in will only charge it to a certain voltage. So you can usually use a higher voltage and have extra capacity. Even though it's not being used.
    Unless the circuit needs low esr. Then adding a higher voltage may mean higher esr too.
    Lower tolerance resistors are cheaper. Pull up resistors for example don't need to be an exact value. Close enough will do.
    An expensive analogue amplifier will have high persision resistors. On filters and transistor resistors.

    Thank you! The caps question was bothering me! lol That helps! For some reason I was thinking they would keep charging. I guess If I think of it like a battery, it's only going to charge to what is pushed to it? Which makes sense, can't make more than what you have, basically!

    Ok, so some of this stuff doesn't have to be exact to work, Would tighter percentages/tolerances on the sound boards help to take out buzzing or clean up the sound? Is there anything I can modify there? This is what actually started me thinking on some of this. I have buzzing in both of my pins. Not loud, and probably wouldn't be noticed anywhere else. But for home use it's annoying sometimes. And of course.....I'm not the type of person that can just leave things alone! I have to take everything apart and Mess with it!

    #5 5 years ago
    Quoted from Allibaster:

    Cost drives most of it. 100V caps are generally more expensive than 35V caps. Same goes for resistor tolerances. Even though they are cheap parts individually, they can really add up in the long run when you're talking production volumes.
    Higher voltage caps don't change much other than what they're rated for. For example, you can get really nice tires for your car rated up to 170 MPH, but they're going to have a similar performance as 100 MPH tires if you're always driving the speed limit (generically speaking).

    That's what I was wondering, if it was a cost thing. And now that time has passed, some of the parts could be changed for better quality parts fairly cheap. Not that it would matter much, just my way of learning I guess. If I mess with it I remember a lot more, than if I just read it somewhere.

    I did have Z rated tires once! They didn't make the car go any faster. The computer shut it down!(limited it) Never did find the wire to cut to get past that! Jkg!! I understand what you were getting at!

    #6 5 years ago

    I'm with you. I like to know the why , what and how of the components. I learned a lot through the Navy but needed a primer when I got back into pinball and started doing board repair. This book is pretty good and uses physical experiments to show you how it all works from batteries to integrated circuits.

    http://www.makershed.com/products/make-electronics-2ed

    As for a buzzing machine, most can be eliminated by good grounding and a new volume pot.

    #7 5 years ago
    Quoted from Mk1Mod0:

    I'm with you. I like to know the why , what and how of the components. I learned a lot through the Navy but needed a primer when I got back into pinball and started doing board repair. This book is pretty good and uses physical experiments to show you how it all works from batteries to integrated circuits.
    http://www.makershed.com/products/make-electronics-2ed
    As for a buzzing machine, most can be eliminated by good grounding and a new volume pot.

    Thank you! I'll check the link out!

    You know, Now that you mention it, when I was turning the volume inside the one machine, it sounded scratchy. I think I have some in my "experiment" pile of parts. I'll have to see if I have one the same size and try it. I ordered parts for the cpu,to replace corroded SRC's and other parts in that area, so I'll have to wait till I get that back together to try it. The corrosion was bad enough I could taste it when I was messing with the board. Kind of like when you change and clean the terminals on a car battery.

    The other machine makes the noise with the display changes(Rescue 911) But...........That is "her game"(she thinks)! And she plays it every night. So, I have to leave that one alone until I get the other one completed!

    #8 5 years ago
    Quoted from Joker2415:

    Thank you! I'll check the link out!
    You know, Now that you mention it, when I was turning the volume inside the one machine, it sounded scratchy. I think I have some in my "experiment" pile of parts. I'll have to see if I have one the same size and try it. I ordered parts for the cpu,to replace corroded SRC's and other parts in that area, so I'll have to wait till I get that back together to try it. The corrosion was bad enough I could taste it when I was messing with the board. Kind of like when you change and clean the terminals on a car battery.
    The other machine makes the noise with the display changes(Rescue 911) But...........That is "her game"(she thinks)! And she plays it every night. So, I have to leave that one alone until I get the other one completed!

    The potentiometer controlling volume is probably dirty on the inside. You can take it apart and clean it or track down a replacement.

    If the DMD is making a lot of noise, it's usually a Cherry-branded display, and the only way to fix it is to replace it.

    #9 5 years ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    The potentiometer controlling volume is probably dirty on the inside. You can take it apart and clean it or track down a replacement.
    If the DMD is making a lot of noise, it's usually a Cherry-branded display, and the only way to fix it is to replace it.

    I just went and looked at the display, and it is a Cherry.

    Were these speaker covers originally glass? I'm guessing they broke when the top glass was lifted out with the molding, causing the bottom panel to fall? That is the only thing I can think of why there are so many missing. I found an older post from you with the link to the replacements(thanks by the way, I looked everywhere until I found that post). And your not Joking about shipping being a little pricey! They wanted more to ship it than what the part cost! So, I'll have to wait a little while to order that.

    #10 5 years ago

    The speaker panel covers are some sort of plexiglass. There were never made of actual glass.

    #11 5 years ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    The speaker panel covers are some sort of plexiglass. There were never made of actual glass.

    I guessed wrong .. lol I do notice a lot of them missing. I wonder where they go? Maybe they were picked at and broken when they were on routes? Who knows! It's one of the mysteries of pinball!

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