(Topic ID: 123208)

Can this hack be fixed? Will it be reliable?


By Dawson

4 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 19 posts
  • 10 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 years ago by thedefog
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

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#1 4 years ago

I blew a right flipper fuse on the Austin powers.. I though that was weird...
A week later the left flipper has blown a fuse, I replace the fuse, turn the game on and the flipper Locks on .. I check q-15,Q16. Looks like a hack from the top ..

Q-15 was blown .. But how reliable is this

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#2 4 years ago

Just because guns and soldering irons are cheap, does not mean that everyone should use them.

That is an awful repair but it might last a while.

If it were in my possession, I'd fix it better.

Keep some extra fuses handy.

#3 4 years ago

ya not pretty but it should be fine

if the flipper is stuck on the transistor probably failed but not necessarily from the hack

#4 4 years ago

Thanks for the input , ordered a few transistors from pinball life (man they ship fast) ..I guess to "fix it better I would have to rebuild traces and pads ... I Never have done that .. I did see a trace pen at the local electronic supply store ... It was heavy and 70 bucks, it had silver in it . They also had a flux pen , anyone ever use one of them ..

Tj

#5 4 years ago

I would trust a piece of wire (as used) more than a trace pen personally

whatever solder you use should have rosin core so you should not really need flux for any of that work... you might want some pcb cleaner/flux remover though to clean up after

#6 4 years ago
Quoted from Dawson:

Thanks for the input , ordered a few transistors from pinball life (man they ship fast) ..I guess to "fix it better I would have to rebuild traces and pads ... I Never have done that .. I did see a trace pen at the local electronic supply store ... It was heavy and 70 bucks, it had silver in it . They also had a flux pen , anyone ever use one of them ..

If you want to do the repair: read-up on soldering, buy the right tools and practice on something less valuable than a pinball circuit board. Working on a board that has already been hacked is not the easiest of repairs.

http://pinballrehab.com/1-articles/solid-state-repair/tutorials/167-soldering-tutorials

Skip the trace pen (they're worthless in this type of application) and when you're first starting out some additional flux will make your life a lot easier. Even experienced solderers use flux when de-soldering.

#7 4 years ago
Quoted from terryb:

Even experienced solderers use flux when de-soldering.

that depends on the tools being used... if you are using braid then yes, flux is almost mandatory... if you are a using a nice de-soldering station with a pump it is unnecessary

#8 4 years ago

Post that pic in the worst hacks thread. That looks like something I would have done the first month I started doing electronics in High School.

#9 4 years ago
Quoted from thedefog:

Post that pic in the worst hacks thread. That looks like something I would have done the first month I started doing electronics in High School.

Cool soldering in high school , we didn't have that class ..

Quoted from flecom:

that depends on the tools being used... if you are using braid then yes, flux is almost mandatory... if you are a using a nice de-soldering station with a pump it is unnecessary

From my experience ,soldering transistors is easy business..with a cheep pump and loads of flux.. I like lots of flux , flux just seems to conduct heat upon contact ..

But man these modern machines have tiny traces .

Great input
Thanks again

#10 4 years ago

The soldering trace pen was way too expensive for me anyway and it seemed gimmickry .. I've had crap luck using braid.. What about a flux pen ?

#11 4 years ago

I personally would get a desoldering iron and get all the old crap out of there, then resolder them.
Then as far as that broken trace, using a piece of wire isn't such a bad idea if it done neatly.
Those trace pens can leave broken contact spots and the tight space of those fine lines may make it very difficult to make some nice clean lines.
Better than paying a huge chunk of change to buy a new board.
But if that's the route you go, that board is the 520-5137-01 on Austin Powers.

#12 4 years ago

The trace pen will work but not when you have to cross over another trace, thats why a wire or a copper trace repair kit would be best.

This hack job would be reliable, it just isnt neat or pretty.

Would I try to fix it better? Not if it didnt need anything (although I couldn't stand to leave it that way)
But since you have to replace the transistor, I would straighten up that mess.

You would have peace of mind for your pin and future reliablity.

#13 4 years ago
Quoted from Dawson:

Cool soldering in high school , we didn't have that class ..

Neither did we. I had my dad's soldering iron and broken machines that I would try to "fix".

#14 4 years ago

I fixed it up continuity checks out so hope for the best

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#15 4 years ago

You can solder on the top side of the board when someone destroyed the through holes. You can use wire leads to stitch the blown out holes too.

Your fix looks fine as long as there is continuity everywhere.

Andrew

#16 4 years ago

My compliments to you. You did an excellent job of cleaning up that board. The MPU on my STTNG was about as bad. To add insult to injury, the person who had hacked it decided that it would be a good idea to cover over the hack job with blobs of silicon. Lot's of fun to clean up.

#17 4 years ago
Quoted from flecom:

that depends on the tools being used... if you are using braid then yes, flux is almost mandatory... if you are a using a nice de-soldering station with a pump it is unnecessary

Completely depends on the board you're looking at and what condition it's in.

A board where the solder is dull and not shiny often desolders 10x easier if you use a little liquid or paste flux. Resoldering the part before desoldering accomplishes about the same thing, but then you're heating the board up one more time.

Liquid flux is inexpensive, works well, and easily cleaned up. I'd rather be 'safe than sorry' in applications where the traces are fine and not forgiving - like a RAM chip on a WPC CPU.

Don't be afraid of flux, just make sure you clean it up when finished.

#18 4 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

Completely depends on the board you're looking at and what condition it's in.
A board where the solder is dull and not shiny often desolders 10x easier if you use a little liquid or paste flux. Resoldering the part before desoldering accomplishes about the same thing, but then you're heating the board up one more time.
Liquid flux is inexpensive, works well, and easily cleaned up. I'd rather be 'safe than sorry' in applications where the traces are fine and not forgiving - like a RAM chip on a WPC CPU.
Don't be afraid of flux, just make sure you clean it up when finished.

If a part is being uncooperative I usually just add a bit more solder as you mentioned (I just use the desoldering gun itself so not much reheating) so like I said, its unnecessary, as in, you don't HAVE to... but you certainly can use flux if you want to go that route... like I said when I am working on large things and need to use braid flux is like magic... different strokes

#19 4 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

Liquid flux is inexpensive, works well, and easily cleaned up.

I probably overuse my liquid flux pens, always use them it on SMD stuff and mostly on corrosion jobs. I have yet to run into the issues people say can happen from using it too much (it is an acid, so it eats away at the surface of the copper to make a better bond, but it isn't like you're pouring feric-chloroide on it). The paste I only use on coils, pots, and and ground connections that require higher heat, and if something previously had flux on it, I don't use it.

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