(Topic ID: 132130)

Cabinet Restoration - Vid's Guide


By vid1900

4 years ago



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    #101 3 years ago

    that reminded me of some of Brian Kelly's picture
    76da0a94ac07c7aa3746df098cc502647035899d_(resized).jpg

    #102 3 years ago
    Quoted from Syco54645:

    would I want 2 of these? one for the length and one for the width?

    Squeeze the joint together by hand to get an idea of how much pressure you are going to need. 2 clamps at least, maybe 4 if the the joint is fighting you.

    #103 3 years ago

    REPAIRING SEPARATED CORNER ON LOWER CAB

    =====================================

    1. Prop up milk crates or bar stool to take weight off of the leg.

    2. Remove leg on affected side.

    3. Using a chisel, knock out wood Gusset from inside corner. Be careful not to nick your blade on the staples.

    3a. Save Leg Bolt Plate from Gusset.

    4. Wedge the joint open and scrape out any wood chips or other garbage that would prevent the joint from closing evenly.

    5. Vacuum the joint clean.

    6. Apply a liberal amount of Titebond3 or Carpenters Glue to BOTH sides of the joint.

    7. Clamp joint together. Use some scrap wood strips to keep the clamps from scratching/denting the cab.

    8. Remove staples from Gusset. Glue in Gusset in corner. Pneumatically staple it in place, or flex a thin scrap of wood from the bottom brace to hold it.

    8a. If Gusset is cracked, make a new one. Set your table saw blade to 45 degrees and run a few feet of 2x4 lumber through the saw. Cutting off a corner makes a perfect replacement Gusset. Save the excess Gusset for next time.

    9. With a damp cloth, wipe glue squeeze-out from along the outside of the joint.

    10. Allow to dry over night.

    11. Run a 3/8" drill through the cab holes and through the Gusset to clean out any glue. Ream the drill bit around a few times because you want the hole **slightly** bigger than 3/8".

    12. Reinstall the Leg Bolt Plate.

    1 week later
    #104 3 years ago

    One thing I hope you cover in this series is how to replace sagging cabinet bottoms. It seems pretty chronic in all my old pins.

    #105 3 years ago
    Quoted from uncivil_engineer:

    One thing I hope you cover in this series is how to replace sagging cabinet bottoms. It seems pretty chronic in all my old pins.

    I second this request!

    #106 3 years ago
    Quoted from Syco54645:

    how about repairing this corner. Pretty bad so I want to repair it before it gets any worse. I have beefier leg brackets on hand I just do not know how to squeeze the corner back together. I have titebond but I am not sure what clamping method to use. I have used ratchet straps around a machine in the past and do not feel that it worked too well.

    Just thought I check in and see how this worked. Have you tried it yet, using pipe clamps?
    Here's the thing (with apologies to Vid for wading in on his thread): I could be wrong, as I don't know what other peoples' experience of this has been like, but I personally would not hold out a lot of hope for an effective and lasting repair being accomplished by squirting tons of glue at the seam and then clamping the hell out of it. If you use enough wood glue for it to make a decent bond, the squeeze out is gonna make a bloody mess (and you'll have that to deal with during and after clamping). I'm coming at this from the perspective of being a professional cabinet maker. It's next to impossible to make a good glue joint if you can't get the seam open and get good, consistent glue coverage on the surfaces. To repair this you really have to plan on emptying out the cabinet just about entirely, then try to pry open the seam, messily apply glue as best you can using a toothbrush or plumber's acid brush, and work quickly enough to get it clamped up within 8 minutes. Vid's bullet point instruction list is just about exactly how you should go about attempting this. It's surely worth a try, as salvaging the cabinet is a smaller project than replacing it, but to my eye those cabinets are pretty much at death's door.

    #107 3 years ago

    All of that is a little bit of a self-serving windup to this...
    I am currently (read:intermittently, as primary occupation has been blessedly busy of late) working on figuring out a good method for making replacement pinball cabinets. One consideration in this potential venture is the high cost of shipping a big empty box. But if people are willing to go to the trouble of messily trying to re-glue plywood that is delaminating, I would think that glueing up a fresh cabinet would be actually way easier. There are a couple ways to go about assembling a pin cabinet; the later model Williams cabinets use locking mitered corners, which are finicky to glue up but extremely strong when finished, and if I was going to build one for myself that's probably what I'd do. On the other hand, it's entirely possible to make a very strong cabinet using knock down hardware. Purists would certainly object to this, but a pragmatist might consider the cheaper cost of shipping + 10 minutes' simple assembly time and see the value in that.

    This might really be the subject for another thread altogether, come to think (this conversation just got my wheels turning). If any of you guys want to weigh in with an opinion, I'd welcome the input in a PM. For now, I'll bow out and let Vid have his thread back

    #108 3 years ago

    Nobody makes anything but WPC cabinets, so someone who makes Bally, Gottlieb, etc. cabs would be welcome.

    #109 3 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    Nobody makes anything but WPC cabinets, so someone who makes Bally, Gottlieb, etc. cabs would be welcome.

    Would be happy to do those, ideally would like to have a library of files for all different cabinet styles. Will need donor cabs or good plans to work from in order to build such a library.

    #110 3 years ago

    I will be building (again) a new cabinet for my custom tiki retheme, and I'll make a point of posting up some pics when I do.

    I have a few photos from the first build, but they're only of so-so quality for the purposes of seeing what is going on. I'm re-doing the cabinet again because I learned so much on the first attempt that I want to fix everything I got wrong or could improve upon. I should end up with tighter/cleaner joints, will be using better quality plywood, and will know what the heck I'm doing for the veneer work for the artwork on the sides so I can get nice tight seams and no bubbling.

    All of the corners are using a lock miter joint routed into the edge of the plywood. The better quality ply I will be switching to will make for a smoother routed joint with less tear out.
    IMG_1255_(resized).JPG
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    Some pics of the veneer work here. Side of the cabinet uses zebrawood, ebony, mahogany, and curly maple veneers, and the legs are solid sapele and laminated bamboo.
    IMG_20160221_210322_(resized).jpg
    IMG_20160224_224650_(resized).jpg
    The W.I.P. cabinet at the 2016 Texas Pinball Festival.
    20160320_145947_(resized).jpg

    #111 3 years ago

    Vid, did this thread die?

    I have a faded Scared Stiff that is otherwise in good shape, it needs the reds and greens. I'd hate to sand off the original artwork and put on crappy decals, (or use sharpies).

    What's the best way to recolor faded but otherwise good cabs?

    #112 3 years ago
    Quoted from mamawaldee:

    Vid, did this thread die?
    I have a faded Scared Stiff that is otherwise in good shape, it needs the reds and greens. I'd hate to sand off the original artwork and put on crappy decals, (or use sharpies).
    What's the best way to recolor faded but otherwise good cabs?

    There was a thread somewhere where someone airbrushed the reds on a faded No Fear cabinet.

    #113 3 years ago
    Quoted from mamawaldee:

    Vid, did this thread die?
    I have a faded Scared Stiff that is otherwise in good shape, it needs the reds and greens. I'd hate to sand off the original artwork and put on crappy decals, (or use sharpies).
    What's the best way to recolor faded but otherwise good cabs?

    Use Frisket, just like you would do on a playfield.

    Cut out the green first, then do the red.

    #114 3 years ago

    I am about to strip and repaint my Bally Skateball cabinet. I received my stencil kit from Pinball Pimp, he recommends using regular Rustolium 2x enamel (or Krylon)rattle can paints. Earlier in this thread enamel was frowned upon. I have spray equipment available. I could use Createx paints for the base coat and accents. How much will I need to cover the whole cabinet and back box? Does anybody recommend a favorite paint?

    And how are we best to determine the proper colors other than a side by side comparison?

    #115 3 years ago

    For the Createx 2X I had a bad experience with it skinning over and pulling up with the stencil. I spent a lot of time experimenting with dry time and paint brands using scrap stencil pieces. I recommend against a super fast drying paint for that reason. I went with an oil based rust paint also by Rustoleum (Tremclad brand in Canada but sold as something else in the US). It worked extremely well. It also mimics most the old school paint the factory used.

    I use the 2X stuff quite a bit for other things and it is great for a base coat and really does cover well. If using it with a stencil though, I finish spraying, put down the can, and immediately start peeling up the stencil. I keep Q-tips and Naptha nearby to touch of the inevitable little strings that can form.

    #116 3 years ago
    Quoted from Platypus:

    And how are we best to determine the proper colors other than a side by side comparison?

    Usually, I just roll the cab or head into the local paint store on a dolly.

    As long as they have a dime size spot of unfaded paint (under the armor, under the coin door frame, under/inside head), they will match it no problem.

    Get a quart of their highest quality paints, because you will probably have to thin them to spray them. Cheap paints are already too thin.

    Remember to use compatible primer. If you don't, the new paint may lift when you pull the stencils.

    #117 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Usually, I just roll the cab or head into the local paint store on a dolly.
    As long as they have a dime size spot of unfaded paint (under the armor, under the coin door frame, under/inside head), they will match it no problem.

    That is a great idea, not so hard with the machine partly stripped. My problem is which paint store? I have an account at the local Sherwin Williams (for house paints) or do I go to the auto paints store? If I order Createx, I can't do that and have to mix my own.

    Quoted from vid1900:

    Remember to use compatible primer. If you don't, the new paint may lift when you pull the stencils.

    How will I know if it is compatible?

    I am aiming towards a PCL epoxy primer, spray with an auto base coat, scuff and accents with some sort of rattle can, probably Krylon.

    There are way too many choices.

    #118 3 years ago
    Quoted from sethbenjamin:

    Just thought I check in and see how this worked. Have you tried it yet, using pipe clamps?
    Here's the thing (with apologies to Vid for wading in on his thread): I could be wrong, as I don't know what other peoples' experience of this has been like, but I personally would not hold out a lot of hope for an effective and lasting repair being accomplished by squirting tons of glue at the seam and then clamping the hell out of it. If you use enough wood glue for it to make a decent bond, the squeeze out is gonna make a bloody mess (and you'll have that to deal with during and after clamping). I'm coming at this from the perspective of being a professional cabinet maker. It's next to impossible to make a good glue joint if you can't get the seam open and get good, consistent glue coverage on the surfaces. To repair this you really have to plan on emptying out the cabinet just about entirely, then try to pry open the seam, messily apply glue as best you can using a toothbrush or plumber's acid brush, and work quickly enough to get it clamped up within 8 minutes. Vid's bullet point instruction list is just about exactly how you should go about attempting this. It's surely worth a try, as salvaging the cabinet is a smaller project than replacing it, but to my eye those cabinets are pretty much at death's door.

    Been too busy to do it so far. Fixed another cab with this method though and it has held strong. Also will be replacing the inside with a stronger leg plate so there is that...

    #119 3 years ago

    Alright vid, here is yet another one. Same cab (pinbot) different issue. The mount for the head has broken free. In the back it was screwed together with 6 or so metal plates. How to fix it right? Pic is of the split.
    Thinking I will have to remove the head completely, remove the metal brackets from the back and then glue and clamp. Will that be strong enough after this?

    pasted_image_(resized).png

    #120 3 years ago

    Best glue to join delaminated plywood, open corners etc is av515 by bostik.
    HOWEVER you need to practice as the stuff foams up as it dries and once clamped you can't touch it until it dries. Once you get used to it it is truly unbelievable stuff.
    I REPEAT please practice first otherwise you will make an absolute mess.

    Another tip regardless of glue type is if you use a timber block to clamp something wrap it in plastic to prevent block gluing to cabinet etc.

    avs_av515_450g_web_(resized).jpg

    #122 3 years ago
    Quoted from Platypus:

    My problem is which paint store? I have an account at the local Sherwin Williams (for house paints) or do I go to the auto paints store? If I order Createx, I can't do that and have to mix my own.

    Most auto stores only sell factory colors, and don't do matching.

    Sherwin Williams would be your store.

    -

    A few colors (like hot orange) will have to be Createx, because no one locally can match/mix those.

    Quoted from Platypus:

    How will I know if it is compatible?

    Test on a scrap panel.

    2pack auto primers seem to be good with just about anything.

    Oil-based KILZ primer goes good with latex paints.

    #123 3 years ago
    Quoted from Syco54645:

    The mount for the head has broken free. In the back it was screwed together with 6 or so metal plates. How to fix it right?

    A bare wood to bare wood joint is the perfect candidate to be repaired with Titebond3.

    The wood will break before the glue will.

    #124 3 years ago
    Quoted from Platypus:

    I am about to strip and repaint my Bally Skateball cabinet. I received my stencil kit from Pinball Pimp, he recommends using regular Rustolium 2x enamel (or Krylon)rattle can paints. Earlier in this thread enamel was frowned upon. I have spray equipment available. I could use Createx paints for the base coat and accents. How much will I need to cover the whole cabinet and back box? Does anybody recommend a favorite paint?
    And how are we best to determine the proper colors other than a side by side comparison?

    When I restencilled my Skateball, I used the Ironlak line of spraypaint. They have really good pigment loads in the lighter colors like yellow and white so you don't have to do a million coats. They have a huge selection of colors so you know each will be compatible as you spray. Skateball is easy color-wise - it's bright yellow, red and orange. Let the base coat dry fully - its the most likely to pull up when you remove the stencils. I did a Harlem Globetrotters with the Rustoleum 2x and it came out very nice as well. I prefer the Ironlak due to the color selection however.

    #125 3 years ago

    Hey Vid. Thanks for maintaining all of your guides! My question is loosely related to cabinet restoration. How does one go about repairing/installing/replacing the playfield holder? You know the stick that props up the playfield? On my Kings of Steel, it's broken on the cabinet side and on my Meteor its dangerously sharp on the playfield side. Is there a more Vid way of fixing these and creating a safer atmosphere when lifting and supporting a playfield?

    #126 3 years ago

    Our local auto *paint* store not only does custom matching they can also load the paint into a rattle can.

    #127 3 years ago
    Quoted from Tomahawkjim:

    Hey Vid. Thanks for maintaining all of your guides! My question is loosely related to cabinet restoration. How does one go about repairing/installing/replacing the playfield holder? You know the stick that props up the playfield? On my Kings of Steel, it's broken on the cabinet side and on my Meteor its dangerously sharp on the playfield side. Is there a more Vid way of fixing these and creating a safer atmosphere when lifting and supporting a playfield?

    Look for a replacement (put up a WTB ad in the marketplace) or fabricate your own.

    1 week later
    #128 3 years ago

    What's the best method of applying the kilz primer? It's too thick to spray and thinning it down seems to defeat the purpose of using this primer. I was thinking of rolling it on and then a light sanding with fine grit sand paper before spraying my finishing coats.

    #129 3 years ago

    You can spray it with a primer tip for your gun.

    Roll it and sand it is fine too.

    #130 3 years ago

    I have a Space Invaders backbox frame (the part that swings out) that needs repainting. It seems to be of a slightly "softer" wood than the rest of the plywood cabinet, and has taken a few scratches and dinks, especially along the edges. Overall these are small and/or shallow, and not knowing anything about wood repair, I thought I'd fill them in with some epoxy, the 2-part glue stuff in the syringe. Needless to say it didn't adhere well enough, I was able to pick it all off with a fingernail after it dried a couple weeks. What do I want to use to fill in these little imperfections, wood putty? something else?

    #131 3 years ago
    Quoted from jibmums:

    I have a Space Invaders backbox frame (the part that swings out) that needs repainting. It seems to be of a slightly "softer" wood than the rest of the plywood cabinet

    Yes, it's made of real pine lumber.

    Quoted from jibmums:

    and has taken a few scratches and dinks, especially along the edges. Overall these are small and/or shallow, and not knowing anything about wood repair, I thought I'd fill them in with some epoxy, the 2-part glue stuff in the syringe.

    Glues like epoxy, needs a rough surface (tooth) to adhere to. The smooth painted surface of a cab is not rough enough.

    The edge is the hardest thing to get a small section of brittle glue to stick to, and it usually chips off upon first impact.

    You will need to rough up the section you are gluing, and maybe even drill some small holes in it to allow the resin to flow into it.

    #132 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Yes, it's made of real pine lumber.

    Glues like epoxy, needs a rough surface (tooth) to adhere to. The smooth painted surface of a cab is not rough enough.
    The edge is the hardest thing to get a small section of brittle glue to stick to, and it usually chips off upon first impact.
    You will need to rough up the section you are gluing, and maybe even drill some small holes in it to allow the resin to flow into it.

    I can rough them up a bit with sandpaper, and scratch out the paint in the gouges (it was repainted by the former owner) with a knife or Dremel. Would you suggest using something like Kwikwood 2-pt putty this time around?

    #133 3 years ago

    Kwickwood is good.

    But the edge has very little surface area to grip to, yet it's the most exposed to damage.

    Sometimes if it's too dinged up on the edges, I'll just cut new wood - faster, and the repairs won't chip off on the first bump.

    #134 3 years ago

    Luckily this is just a spare "display" backbox, I wanted to practice...or rather, acquire...some woodworking skills on it. Thanks as always for the help, Vid.

    #135 3 years ago

    Vid-
    If you covered this and I missed it, I apologize. What is the best way to repair lock-bar holes? I was going to put cardboard on the inside of the cabinet, then fill with resin, but wondered if that would hold (can't score the inside of a hole, and can't put screws into a hole the way you did with a damaged corner) if I remove the cardboard. Alternatively, I could screw or woodglue a thin piece of wood inside the cabinet and just leave it there, but it wouldn't look good or original.

    #136 3 years ago
    Quoted from shirkle:

    Vid-
    If you covered this and I missed it, I apologize. What is the best way to repair lock-bar holes? I was going to put cardboard on the inside of the cabinet, then fill with resin, but wondered if that would hold (can't score the inside of a hole, and can't put screws into a hole the way you did with a damaged corner) if I remove the cardboard. Alternatively, I could screw or woodglue a thin piece of wood inside the cabinet and just leave it there, but it wouldn't look good or original.

    Get some a wood dowel stock a bit bigger than the hole, drill the hole to match the dowel diameter & glue it in. Fill & sand smooth. Paint & you will never know it was there.

    #137 3 years ago

    Nice thread!

    #138 3 years ago
    Quoted from shirkle:

    Vid-
    If you covered this and I missed it, I apologize. What is the best way to repair lock-bar holes? I was going to put cardboard on the inside of the cabinet, then fill with resin, but wondered if that would hold (can't score the inside of a hole, and can't put screws into a hole the way you did with a damaged corner) if I remove the cardboard. Alternatively, I could screw or woodglue a thin piece of wood inside the cabinet and just leave it there, but it wouldn't look good or original.

    A wood dowel is good to glue in (like Dasvis said), tap it in about 1/8" below the front surface, then Bondo and feather out.

    Or you can fill with resin. No need to score the inside of the hole, because the plywood will be naturally rough.

    #139 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mxzmark:

    What's the best method of applying the kilz primer? It's too thick to spray and thinning it down seems to defeat the purpose of using this primer. I was thinking of rolling it on and then a light sanding with fine grit sand paper before spraying my finishing coats.

    I just sprayed kilz through a cheap HF HVLP gun last week on some doors in my house. I thinned with 20% windshield washer fluid. Sounds crazy but it worked great and are not tinted blue whatsoever. I will more than likely finish painting them this week/weekend.

    #140 3 years ago

    Vid, what's your thought on putting a clear coat over decals? Overkill?

    #141 3 years ago
    Quoted from jsa:

    Vid, what's your thought on putting a clear coat over decals? Overkill?

    Some decals melt from the clear.

    You can get decals laminated for about $1-2 a square foot at any sign shop.

    Then they look like those Rad-cals from JJP

    #142 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Some decals melt from the clear.
    You can get decals laminated for about $1-2 a square foot at any sign shop.
    Then they look like those Rad-cals from JJP

    Good tip! I'll avoid melting the decals.

    Also, presuming I get some good coats of Kilz Original primer per your recommendation, for the parts of my cabinet that aren't vinyl decals, (either black or purple on a BoP), but have a rather large surface area, just a high-end semi-gloss urethane-based paint from a good paint store, correct?

    #143 3 years ago
    Quoted from jsa:

    Also, presuming I get some good coats of Kilz Original primer per your recommendation, for the parts of my cabinet that aren't vinyl decals, (either black or purple on a BoP), but have a rather large surface area, just a high-end semi-gloss urethane-based paint from a good paint store, correct?

    Ideally, you want a primer that matches your paint.

    If you are shooting 2 part Urethane paint, you should shoot the matching 2 part primer.

    Way less chance of lifting or wrinkling if everything is the same process and brand.

    #144 3 years ago
    Quoted from sethbenjamin:

    Just thought I check in and see how this worked. Have you tried it yet, using pipe clamps?

    I just did it, used titebond 2 and 6 ratchet straps. Will report back how it works. Will need to cut a new gusset in the am.

    Scratch that, new gusset cut and installed. looks like I will be done sooner than I thought. Can't wait for it to dry so I can move fix the last bit of cab integrity.

    #145 3 years ago

    BEST PLYWOOD FOR CABINET REPAIR OR BUILDING FROM SCRATCH

    ==================================================

    If you've ever gone to Home Depot and tried to find an actual flat piece of plywood, you know how difficult it can be.

    Big box store's plywood is terrible, full of voids and patches (known as "boatmen").

    boatman_(resized).jpg

    These boatmen often telegraph through the paint over the years as the wood expands and contracts.

    -

    cheap plywood (resized).jpg

    Voids in cheap plywood can come back and bite you in the ass.

    -

    Big Box stores also sell "Oak" or "Birch" plywood. Don't be fooled, that plywood is the same soft Pine plywood as the other junk, just with a paper thin veneer of Oak on the two faces.

    This veneer is so thin, that you can sand through it in a blink of an eye.

    This veneer is so thin, that often underlying boatmen telegraph through the veneer over time.

    quarter-sawn-oak-veneer-plywood-jq8fsnsf1kv2vnzz_(resized).JPG

    Even the veneer of Oak plywood is very "open grain" so the grain will require much filling and sanding to give a smooth paint surface.

    -

    Baltic Birch is a great plywood with about 3x the number of plys for the same thickness sheet.

    The 1/4" Baltic Birch is great stuff for the bottom panel of a cabinet.

    But 3/4" Baltic Birch is 2.25 pounds per square foot, compared to regular plywood at 1.4 pounds - so it makes for a VERY heavy cabinet. Do not underestimate how heavy a Baltic cabinet will end up being!

    baltic_birch_(resized).jpg

    All those plys in Baltic Birch make it very stable, because they are all the same wood species; Birch.

    -

    The best plywood for building cabs from scratch is MDO Plywood. Medium Density Overlay Plywood.

    It's real plywood, so it glues and holds screws perfectly.

    But it has a thin venier of MDF on both faces, that is usually pre-primed.

    Because the MDF is 50x thicker than a "birch" veneer, the defects in the underlying wood do not telegraph through.

    The MDF is perfectly flat. No filling, no sanding, no graining, no telegraphing and usually no priming is needed.

    This saves you about 8 hours of prep time, and gives you a flatter cab than you could sand by hand.

    Williams used this stuff on it's latter games that had super detailed silkscreened graphics.

    http://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/panel-products/industrial-panels/mdf-mdo-panels/roseburg-3-4-x-4-x-8-mdo-plywood/p-1444452506069-c-13338.htm?tid=8840372650345142831

    MDO-A_(resized).jpg

    #146 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Ideally, you want a primer that matches your paint.
    If you are shooting 2 part Urethane paint, you should shoot the matching 2 part primer.
    Way less chance of lifting or wrinkling if everything is the same process and brand.

    Let's presume that I was using a 1 part oil-based primer like Kilz Original. I then used a semi-gloss oil-based paint for the top coat (i.e., the back of the back box, the top of the back box). The silk screen warning label then goes over that. Do you then clear over that?

    #147 3 years ago
    Quoted from jsa:

    Let's presume that I was using a 1 part oil-based primer like Kilz Original. I then used a semi-gloss oil-based paint for the top coat (i.e., the back of the back box, the top of the back box). The silk screen warning label then goes over that. Do you then clear over that?

    The original cab did not have any clear coat.

    So, it's up to you if you want to take it to "the next level".

    #148 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    The original cab did not have any clear coat.
    So, it's up to you if you want to take it to "the next level".

    I've been researching using Sherwin Williams paint but I'm not sure if they have a product that would work. For example, they have this:

    http://www.sherwin-williams.com/homeowners/products/catalog/all-surface-enamel-oil-base/?referringCategory=interior-paint-coatings/paint/&N=106978319

    but it's only available in satin and gloss, not semi-gloss. I'm not sure I have the tools to do a 2 PACK style automotive paint so I'm trying to see how I could pull it off with a high quality home paint.

    #149 3 years ago
    Quoted from jsa:

    I've been researching using Sherwin Williams paint but I'm not sure if they have a product that would work. For example, they have this:

    http://www.sherwin-williams.com/homeowners/products/catalog/all-surface-enamel-oil-base/?referringCategory=interior-paint-coatings/paint/&N=106978319

    Oil based paint in lighter colors tend to discolor (oil paints turn yellow).

    Maybe find a Latex paint that has a semi-gloss sheen?

    Quoted from jsa:

    I'm not sure I have the tools to do a 2 PACK style automotive paint so I'm trying to see how I could pull it off with a high quality home paint.

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/16#post-1668988

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/16#post-1670975

    #150 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Oil based paint in lighter colors tend to discolor (oil paints turn yellow).
    Maybe find a Latex paint that has a semi-gloss sheen?

    It sounds like you're saying a latex will work over a Kilz Original oil-based primer, which is great news. The two color top coats will be black and a purple, both fairly dark colors. Given that, would I be better off, in general, with an oil-based for compatibility? For example:

    http://www.sherwin-williams.com/homeowners/products/catalog/proclassic-alkyd-interior-enamel/?referringCategory=interior-paint-coatings/paint/&N=106978319

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