(Topic ID: 132130)

Cabinet Restoration - Vid's Guide

By vid1900

7 years ago


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    There are 925 posts in this topic. You are on page 19 of 19.
    #901 86 days ago
    Quoted from reconsider59:

    My thought is that I can sand down the messed up layers of spraypaint on there, do one quick coat of automotive primer for a new base, then proceed normally.

    I had two instances of needing to fix paint issues after stenciling....one being an accident in the garage where a shelf fell and damaged the cabinet (after the stenciling was done!) and the other I still don't know exactly what happened, but some base paint came up pulling off the stencil despite a week's cure time before stenciling.

    Both repairs came out "ok" and look fine in a nominally lit room. But if you shine a flashlight on it from the right angle, you can see the slight difference in paint shade. If I run into a situation like this again, I think I'd bite the bullet, strip everything off, and re-do the whole side.

    Cabinet
    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/1980-black-knight-player-s-condition-to-something-better/page/2#post-7052623

    Backbox:
    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/1980-black-knight-player-s-condition-to-something-better/page/2#post-7159202

    #902 86 days ago
    Quoted from Mathazar:

    I had two instances of needing to fix paint issues after stenciling....one being an accident in the garage where a shelf fell and damaged the cabinet (after the stenciling was done!) and the other I still don't know exactly what happened, but some base paint came up pulling off the stencil despite a week's cure time before stenciling.
    Both repairs came out "ok" and look fine in a nominally lit room. But if you shine a flashlight on it from the right angle, you can see the slight difference in paint shade. If I run into a situation like this again, I think I'd bite the bullet, strip everything off, and re-do the whole side.
    Cabinet
    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/1980-black-knight-player-s-condition-to-something-better/page/2#post-7052623
    Backbox:
    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/1980-black-knight-player-s-condition-to-something-better/page/2#post-7159202

    Yeah, I'm definitely going to re-do the whole thing. I tried some fixes, but there was bleed, and the difference was really obvious to my eye. I'm not super-picky on cabinets, but it's a scratch-build and my first attempt at doing any sort of painting/cabinetry, so I'm of the mind that if I'm going to do it, I really need to do it right.

    Once more unto the breach!

    1 week later
    #903 78 days ago

    None of my stencils pulled up paint, not even a speck. I started with the backbox, and pulled them fairly soon after painting. Got some bleed when I did that. As we progressed through each stencil, I started leaving them on longer after painting. By the end of the process, ten stencils altogether, I was leaving them on for several hours after painting. For me, it cut down on the bleed over. For some reason, I had the most problems with yellow. Don't know why, that's just how it worked out.

    As Stretch7 said, depends on how bad the area is, and also how much area it covers. Use frisket, or whatever you prefer, mask it off really good, prep it and re-touch. It's tedious, but unless it's really messed up, might be overkill to redo the whole thing, not to mention the cost of a new set of stencils.

    #904 77 days ago

    How to fix screw holes in decals ?

    Hi Pinside, seeking your collective wisdom on this.

    My STTNG arrived. It is mostly in better condition that I thought, and is cleaning up quite nicely.

    I was going to redo the cabinet with new decals, but no longer will, as they are mostly in great condition, and being original, are screen printed.

    Below are photos, left side - mostly excellent, right side has some minor issues with screw holes (see enlarged sun photo as example).

    Right Side headbox decal destroyed, so that will get replaced.

    The advice I am looking for;
    1 - how would you repair the screw holes so they fade away ?
    2 - do I leave the engraved serial # as part of its heritage ? see 4th photo

    Appreciate your thoughts.

    As an fyi, I sourced new legs.

    Thanks,
    Steve

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    #905 77 days ago

    If it was my machine, I would leave the serial numbers. Even with our repainting of Fireball recently, I didn't repair the wood, for instance, some really worn out spots on the front of the backbox below the back glass. They just got worn down from fifty years of use. Cleaned em up as best I could, and repainted. We kind of like the used look, character marks over a long life I guess

    Now, wood rot, or severe wood damage, that's a different story.

    But that's just our/my preference. Mileage definitely will vary.

    #906 77 days ago

    For any of this thread's reference to Titebond III glue, is there a reason to use this glue rather than some type of 'Liquid Nails'? Isn't Liquid Nails stronger?

    #907 77 days ago

    If your not going too do decals I would just leave it over the years trying to fix that most times u just make it worst then what it is now

    #908 77 days ago
    Quoted from Steve100:

    How to fix screw holes in decals ?
    Hi Pinside, seeking your collective wisdom on this.
    My STTNG arrived. It is mostly in better condition that I thought, and is cleaning up quite nicely.
    I was going to redo the cabinet with new decals, but no longer will, as they are mostly in great condition, and being original, are screen printed.
    Below are photos, left side - mostly excellent, right side has some minor issues with screw holes (see enlarged sun photo as example).
    Right Side headbox decal destroyed, so that will get replaced.
    The advice I am looking for;
    1 - how would you repair the screw holes so they fade away ?
    2 - do I leave the engraved serial # as part of its heritage ? see 4th photo
    Appreciate your thoughts.
    As an fyi, I sourced new legs.
    Thanks,
    Steve
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

    Put a screw in each hole, paint the heads black.

    No one will notice them and it will look factory.

    #909 77 days ago

    I agree with leaving the serial number alone but for the hole, it should be a pretty easy fix. I would carefully sand/deburr it, plug with epoxy putty and the man sand smooth. The paint repair can be done with a very fine point brush just laying down dots to replicate the silkscreen. I did this on my AFM as a total newbie and it turned out ok. I bought a little set of water based oil paints that mixed very easily and I was able to match the colour pretty well. If you look closely you can see the difference but if you don’t know it’s there, it blends right in. My colour match wasn’t perfect but for a first attempt I was happy. With the size of repair you are doing it will be invisible.
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    #910 74 days ago
    Quoted from reconsider59:

    My thought is that I can sand down the messed up layers of spraypaint on there, do one quick coat of automotive primer for a new base, then proceed normally.

    If you’re able to safely shoot automotive primer, automotive paints are a pleasure to work with. Dries instantly, and they bite into the layer under them, so you can remove stencils immediately with no paint tearing. Semigloss clearcoat on top and you have a very professional end product.

    #911 74 days ago
    Quoted from bayoubilly70:

    is there a reason to use this glue rather than some type of 'Liquid Nails'? Isn't Liquid Nails stronger?

    Totally depends what you are doing.

    If you are repairing wood - such as, say, a splintered off piece of plywood that you want to glue back on - PVA glue (any of the Titebond ones) will work very, very well, provided you can get the pieces set cleanly and without voids.

    Liquid Nails is great for things like glueing back a little corner block to the bottom panel of the cabinet (which you want to also pop a new staple or two into) or running a bead of glue around the bottom panel where it sits in the dado of the cabinet body. It’ll bond different things (like solid wood and fiber board) and will fill small gaps nicely.

    “Kitty Hair” is a really useful filler when you need a bit of structure in a damaged area but don’t need to build back as much mass as Vid shows in his example of restoring a broken off corner. It’s a fiberglass resin which is thick, not syrupy, and has shredded fiberglass mixed in. It’s a nice thing to use to toughen up the exposed bottom edges of the cabinet plywood.

    #912 74 days ago
    Quoted from Deleenhe:

    If you look closely you can see the difference but if you don’t know it’s there, it blends right in. My colour match wasn’t perfect but for a first attempt I was happy.

    Very nicely done!

    #913 74 days ago

    is there a write up on replacing the back and lower panels on the lower cab of 80s bally/sterns? got a few games local that could use some replacements, never really done cabinet repair so any help would be appreciated.

    #914 74 days ago

    Deleenhe, how did you avoid brush strokes. I would rather brush paint when I can, especially small areas, but I have never been able to get that smooth look. I know it's possible, but I do believe that technique was not included in my talent pool

    #915 74 days ago

    When I'm doing repairs on badly damaged cabinets, I use 2 part epoxy. No polyester resins. Learned this when building boats years ago.
    It's a bit more expensive and harder to work with, but it bonds so much better. I just use tape to overfill the area, then and it down to a crisp corner. Works great. I use wood flour or other fillers sometimes, but it's usually straight epoxy.

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    #916 73 days ago
    Quoted from jlbintn:

    Deleenhe, how did you avoid brush strokes. I would rather brush paint when I can, especially small areas, but I have never been able to get that smooth look. I know it's possible, but I do believe that technique was not included in my talent pool

    With that paint I found it went on pretty smooth with no visible brush strokes and once you add the dots on top anything underneath just blends in.

    #917 73 days ago
    Quoted from ThatOneDude:

    When I'm doing repairs on badly damaged cabinets, I use 2 part epoxy. No polyester resins. Learned this when building boats years ago.
    It's a bit more expensive and harder to work with, but it bonds so much better. I just use tape to overfill the area, then and it down to a crisp corner. Works great. I use wood flour or other fillers sometimes, but it's usually straight epoxy.
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

    Similar to the casting resin solution that Vid posted.

    #918 72 days ago
    Quoted from jlbintn:

    If it was my machine, I would leave the serial numbers. Even with our repainting of Fireball recently, I didn't repair the wood, for instance, some really worn out spots on the front of the backbox below the back glass. They just got worn down from fifty years of use. Cleaned em up as best I could, and repainted. We kind of like the used look, character marks over a long life I guess
    Now, wood rot, or severe wood damage, that's a different story.
    But that's just our/my preference. Mileage definitely will vary.

    Thank you. Serial number will stay. No rot or wood damage, so all good there.

    Cheers

    #919 72 days ago
    Quoted from Williampinball:

    If your not going too do decals I would just leave it over the years trying to fix that most times u just make it worst then what it is now

    Thank you. I will trial once hole 1st and see how I go. Cheers

    #920 72 days ago

    I agree with leaving the serial number alone but for the hole, it should be a pretty easy fix. I would carefully sand/deburr it, plug with epoxy putty and the man sand smooth. The paint repair can be done with a very fine point brush just laying down dots to replicate the silkscreen. I did this on my AFM as a total newbie and it turned out ok. I bought a little set of water based oil paints that mixed very easily and I was able to match the colour pretty well. If you look closely you can see the difference but if you don’t know it’s there, it blends right in. My colour match wasn’t perfect but for a first attempt I was happy. With the size of repair you are doing it will be invisible.

    Some excellent advice thank you. You did an excellent job on AFM repairs. Hope my paint matching skills can be as good. I guess I should be good on the black….

    Whilst a do want a beautiful looking pin, there is a lot to be said for keeping it as original as possible.

    Cheers

    #921 72 days ago
    Quoted from Deleenhe:I agree with leaving the serial number alone but for the hole, it should be a pretty easy fix. I would carefully sand/deburr it, plug with epoxy putty and the man sand smooth. The paint repair can be done with a very fine point brush just laying down dots to replicate the silkscreen. I did this on my AFM as a total newbie and it turned out ok. I bought a little set of water based oil paints that mixed very easily and I was able to match the colour pretty well. If you look closely you can see the difference but if you don’t know it’s there, it blends right in. My colour match wasn’t perfect but for a first attempt I was happy. With the size of repair you are doing it will be invisible.
    [quoted image]
    [quoted image]
    [quoted image]
    [quoted image]
    [quoted image]

    Some excellent advice thank you. You did an excellent job on AFM repairs. Hope my paint matching skills can be as good. I guess I should be good on the black….

    Whilst a do want a beautiful looking pin, there is a lot to be said for keeping it as original as possible.

    Cheers

    #922 71 days ago

    Folks - I have looked for about 30 min (so limited search) for any reference to what black cabinet base coat to use. I have an Addams Family cabinet that has a lot of worn areas (just needs some paint) and 2 large chunks on the top cabinet (will need to be filled and sanded) that I need to repair and am looking for something I can spray with an compressor airbrush. Any thoughts for a single stage option that is readily avail?

    1 week later
    #923 59 days ago

    Anyone have a tip on getting the collar off a Bally Harlem Globetrotters? I pulled the 6 long nails that I thought were holding it on but it still won't come off. Is it glued on as well? If so I will just put some screws back in instead of the nails and try to sand it and paint as best I can with the collar on.

    1 month later
    #924 3 days ago

    Hi everyone, I scoured this thread and I can’t seem to find an answer to this but I’m testing my paints on a piece of spare wood before applying to my freshly primed cabinet. I’ve laid down a gloss enamel (white) with my HVLP, let that dry for a few days then sprayed a few different colour patches over the white. Left that to dry for 12 hours then took a scotchbrite pad to it (lightly!) just to scuff it up before I put down a 2 pac auto clear. Problem is: the colours have run into the white base coat while scuffing it. This is obviously not what I want to happen. Any suggestions ? I’m not sure if it’s because I didn’t leave the colours to dry long enough before using the scotchbrite. Appreciate your input and suggestions

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    #925 3 days ago

    Clean it up with tack cloths, that’s totally normal and acceptable.

    There are 925 posts in this topic. You are on page 19 of 19.

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