(Topic ID: 132130)

Cabinet Restoration - Vid's Guide

By vid1900

6 years ago


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  • 820 posts
  • 170 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 days ago by Mathazar
  • Topic is favorited by 535 Pinsiders

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    There are 820 posts in this topic. You are on page 17 of 17.
    #801 29 days ago
    Quoted from radium:

    I’d be afraid to put anything water-based on it, would worry sanding would open the grain and make it want to move around again when wet. My space station cab was planked like that but I just built a new one.

    FWIW, Jeff Miller (Pinball Pimp Stencils) was the one who recommended Durham's. He said he uses it all the time as part of his cabinet painting process.

    I'm going to work on stripping the rest of the paint this weekend and then touch up some edges with wood epoxy. That'll give me more time to think about how to address the planking (Bondo, Durham's, Fix It All, or other). I picked up some Durham's today and practiced on some spare plywood with different mixing ratios for viscosity, from thicker putty for filling in holes to thinner glaze to smooth out scratches. Not too bad. It's more flexible than bondo in that way, and more importantly it does not set as quickly as bondo giving me more time to work. Within 20 minutes it was set hard and touchable. In under an hour, it was sandable. 4 hours later, hard as rock. At that 4 hour mark, I poured a little water on it and it did NOT soften up....still hard as a rock.

    #802 29 days ago
    Quoted from Mathazar:

    FWIW, Jeff Miller (Pinball Pimp Stencils) was the one who recommended Durham's. He said he uses it all the time as part of his cabinet painting process.
    I'm going to work on stripping the rest of the paint this weekend and then touch up some edges with wood epoxy. That'll give me more time to think about how to address the planking (Bondo, Durham's, Fix It All, or other). I picked up some Durham's today and practiced on some spare plywood with different mixing ratios for viscosity, from thicker putty for filling in holes to thinner glaze to smooth out scratches. Not too bad. It's more flexible than bondo in that way, and more importantly it does not set as quickly as bondo giving me more time to work. Within 20 minutes it was set hard and touchable. In under an hour, it was sandable. 4 hours later, hard as rock. At that 4 hour mark, I poured a little water on it and it did NOT soften up....still hard as a rock.

    Yeah I’ve used Durham's for years I’m just surprised you could use it on a moisture damaged piece, good to know. I used it to fix German Shepherd claw marks in my front door a month ago. Good stuff.

    #803 29 days ago

    Has anyone tried using a thin laminate to remove all grain from a project?

    #804 28 days ago
    Quoted from mof:

    Has anyone tried using a thin laminate to remove all grain from a project?

    As I mentioned before I'm still learning wms games. I wasn't aware of the coil difference so I ordered what ever coils the manual called for. Is there a benefit to using parallel coils?

    #805 28 days ago
    Quoted from Lovef2k:

    Is there a benefit to using parallel coils?

    The reason to switch is so your EOS (End Of Stroke) switches last longer. Here is a link to a thread that talks about doing it. There are lots of discussions on the subject.

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-upgradingrebuilding-flippers/page/2#post-453694

    #806 28 days ago
    Quoted from mof:

    Has anyone tried using a thin laminate to remove all grain from a project?

    What product? Would need to be something thick/rigid enough to bridge the gaps so that nothing would telegraph through. That’s why RadCals don’t need much prep.

    #807 28 days ago
    Quoted from mof:

    Has anyone tried using a thin laminate to remove all grain from a project?

    No, that would add thickness to the cab, that would have to be accounted for, similar to the radcal cut outs for side rails and coin doors—just not a good look.

    If you want to do it right:
    Sand the artwork down (or use the acetone strip method—preference)
    Remove dust
    Skim with fiberglass resin & let dry
    Sand with 60 or 80 grit, leveling as needed.
    Remove dust then sand with 100 or 150 grit
    Skim with dolphin glaze
    Sand with 150 grit, then 220 grit, checking for level with you hand.
    Clean and paint primer.
    Sand with 220 and fill with dolphin glade and sand/primer as needed until fully smooth.

    #808 28 days ago
    Quoted from mof:

    Has anyone tried using a thin laminate to remove all grain from a project?

    It would work, but filler is fast and easy.

    Chris Hutchins just fiberglasses the whole thing if needed with tiger hair or similar glass fiber resin.

    Then final glaze, primer and paint.

    Its quick and easy and can be done in a couple hours.

    #809 28 days ago
    Quoted from mof:

    Has anyone tried using a thin laminate to remove all grain from a project?

    I saw this and though I would try it.

    Ya I know some people trash this guy but I like what he did on this cab. I have several cabs that need to be restored. My Seawitch has the worst planking I have seen so far. Yes I know there will still be work that needs to be done to get the cab ready for veneer. The veneer is from Rockler, birch and is only 1/42 inch thick. It's fairly cheap, $60 for a 96 x 24 inch roll. So 2 of these will be more than enough to do an entire cab I think, depending on if the rear of the backbox needs it.

    I hate sanding, also hate the fast setting of epoxy and the smell. I already have the tools and the cement, so I thought why not?!

    #810 28 days ago
    Quoted from Pin-Pilot:

    The reason to switch is so your EOS (End Of Stroke) switches last longer. Here is a link to a thread that talks about doing it. There are lots of discussions on the subject.
    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-upgradingrebuilding-flippers/page/2#post-453694

    Ah ya threw me off, different thread but I got ya. If I hadn't of bought the flipper coils already, I would go for it. I was reading through the HS manual on the flipper page about how to correctly gap the EOS and lane change switches. I think if I follow this, the EOS should last a while. Well I hope anyway. Is there a specific parallel coil for HS in case I ever do upgrade?

    Another thing I noticed, is the EOS mounting brackets on my game are short and there's no space to zip tie the caps in place.

    #811 27 days ago
    Quoted from Lovef2k:

    Ah ya threw me off, different thread but I got ya. If I hadn't of bought the flipper coils already, I would go for it. I was reading through the HS manual on the flipper page about how to correctly gap the EOS and lane change switches. I think if I follow this, the EOS should last a while. Well I hope anyway. Is there a specific parallel coil for HS in case I ever do upgrade?
    Another thing I noticed, is the EOS mounting brackets on my game are short and there's no space to zip tie the caps in place.

    The coils for HS are FL-11630 Here is a thread: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/high-speed-flipper-coils#post-6048325

    You will need new base plates as well. It is a big upgrade but worth it.

    3 weeks later
    #812 3 days ago

    Looking for a method on how to flatten a cabinet side after applying bondo. I've used bondo to do similar work on a couple of previous cabinets but hadn't run into this problem: After sanding down the bondo, I've got high and low areas that feel "wavy" as you run your hand across the surface. I likely caused this by applying to much pressure on the orbital sander as I was sanding down the clumpy areas of the initial bondo application. I'm not sure how to rectify this without potentially making it worse. My research on belt sanders suggests that might be too aggressive. The area of needed coverage might be too large for a hand or electric planer - I've never used either, and the only usage examples I can find on YouTube are with small boards or 2x4's and not with something this large.

    What do you guys suggest for getting this surface flatter?

    Bondo'd Side 01b (resized).jpgBondo'd Side 02b (resized).jpgBondo'd Side 03b (resized).jpg
    #813 3 days ago
    Quoted from Mathazar:

    Looking for a method on how to flatten a cabinet side after applying bondo. I've used bondo to do similar work on a couple of previous cabinets but hadn't run into this problem: After sanding down the bondo, I've got high and low areas that feel "wavy" as you run your hand across the surface. I likely caused this by applying to much pressure on the orbital sander as I was sanding down the clumpy areas of the initial bondo application. I'm not sure how to rectify this without potentially making it worse. My research on belt sanders suggests that might be too aggressive. The area of needed coverage might be too large for a hand or electric planer - I've never used either, and the only usage examples I can find on YouTube are with small boards or 2x4's and not with something this large.
    What do you guys suggest for getting this surface flatter?
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

    Fiberglass resin. Skim the entire thing with it. See my post above.

    I just did a heavily planked cabinet. Came out glass smooth.

    #814 3 days ago
    Quoted from djblouw:

    Fiberglass resin. Skim the entire thing with it. See my post above.
    I just did a heavily planked cabinet. Came out glass smooth.

    The bondo is already smooth. Wouldn't the fiberglass resin just follow the high and low contours of the bondo and wind up with the same wavy-ness? Or are you suggesting to sand off the bondo entirely and start over? I'm happy with the bondo coverage and smoothness...there's got to be a technique, method, or tool to get it flat.

    #815 3 days ago
    Quoted from Mathazar:

    The bondo is already smooth. Wouldn't the fiberglass resin just follow the high and low contours of the bondo and wind up with the same wavy-ness? Or are you suggesting to sand off the bondo entirely and start over? I'm happy with the bondo coverage and smoothness...there's got to be a technique, method, or tool to get it flat.

    Skim with a wide blade spreader so it spans gaps and deposits material in the low spots. A wide sanding blockwill also help.

    #816 3 days ago

    You could try using a straight edge by dragging it from end to end and mark the low spots with a pencil. Use an 8 inch taping blade for drywall to fill in low spots with resin. Remember plywood is a natural material and your working with a 43 year old cab that has seen better days. There will most likely be some warpage of the wood that you may have to live with.

    #817 3 days ago
    Quoted from radium:

    Skim with a wide blade spreader so it spans gaps and deposits material in the low spots. A wide sanding blockwill also help.

    This is the correct technique to address the issue.

    You may need to pour the fiberglass resin twice. First time use the large spreader. Then use a large flat sanding block, or 1/3rd sheet sander. Once you start to see the wood show through on the peaks, apply the resin a second time, building up the valleys more.

    #818 2 days ago

    Not sure why fiberglass has to be used?
    buy a cheap black can of spray. very lightly spray dust the area that you want to work. let if dry for a few mins. then use a sanding block and sand it. All the paint will we remove from the high spot first so now you know your high spot. any painting that still there, is your low spots which bondo can taken care of. repeat this a few times until you get a nice level surface

    #819 2 days ago
    Quoted from borna:

    Not sure why fiberglass has to be used?
    buy a cheap black can of spray. very lightly spray dust the area that you want to work. let if dry for a few mins. then use a sanding block and sand it. All the paint will we remove from the high spot first so now you know your high spot. any painting that still there, is your low spots which bondo can taken care of. repeat this a few times until you get a nice level surface

    I think it has to do with how warped a cabinet is. Some are mild enough to just get by with primer and paint. Others need more extreme measures where the fiberglass resin and Bondo come in.

    #820 2 days ago

    In my case, it's pretty minor. The cabinet side was flat after stripping and sanding the paint but I've got some highs and lows after applying bondo to cover up/protect the planking that was present. I just need to remove some of those highs where I apparently got a little bondo-happy.

    I like the idea of the black paint dusting to mark the areas and using a sanding block to get them down. Will be trying that this weekend.

    There are 820 posts in this topic. You are on page 17 of 17.

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