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(Topic ID: 132130)

Cabinet Restoration - Vid's Guide


By vid1900

5 years ago



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  • 646 posts
  • 145 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 28 days ago by PinballBillinFL
  • Topic is favorited by 500 Pinsiders

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    There are 646 posts in this topic. You are on page 11 of 13.
    #501 2 years ago
    Quoted from tsinger873:

    Can someone please describe the process of stripping or sanding the cabinet? Can you begin with sandpaper or do you normally use a liquid paint stripper then move on to paper? Does all of the original paint have to be removed down to bare wood before you prime and paint it or just enough to get a smooth finish?

    If the cabinet is just painted... not decals... save yourself the time and cleanup and just sand. If you use stripper... you’ll still be doing a sanding pass anyways. Use a heavy grit and just knock it out quick with an orbital sander. Normally you strip to wood if u are chasing the best finish. Less variables.

    #502 2 years ago

    Thank you Sir!

    #504 2 years ago

    Keep in mind that old cabs, esp EM's may have lead paint - in the paint and leached into wood. Protect yourself (respirator, hand washing, shop coveralls for this purpose only) and control/collect/dispose of resulting dust. I use a citrus based stripper to remove the bulk of the paint thus reducing the hazard and sand with an attached vac w/ filter and/or outside.

    #505 2 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    5. Glue up
    Here is the big moment.
    Once you apply the glue, the clock starts ticking.
    Don't look at your phone, don't let your boyfriend talk to you, keep your head on straight.
    You already did your dry run, so you KNOW the joint will clamp up squarely and you know how many clamps you will need.
    Use an Acid Brush, to apply glue to 100% of the joint on both sides.
    [quoted image]
    Apply more glue than necessary, it's cheap, and any extra will simply squeeze out and get wiped away.
    Make sure your clamping leaves room to wipe the extra glue away.
    Use a damp (not wet) cloth to wipe away the extra.
    How do you know if you used enough glue?
    You are looking for a 100% Squeezeout once clamping pressure is applied:
    [quoted image]
    Even on the inside, we want a 100% Squeeze out, the sign of a quality glue joint:
    [quoted image]
    Wipe up any excess and check for squareness one last time before you let the joint sit overnight.
    6. Once the joint is dry the next day, put the leg back on the game.
    If you installed a new Gusset, drill it out with an 3/8" drill bit, using the outside cab holes as your guide.

    Just an FYI from one of the pics in this post. You should always clamp using a block.

    The block does two things:

    1. Protects work piece from indentations from the clamp face. You don't have to over-tighten to get indentations. Softer woods and plywoods often are not hard enough to accept suitable clamping pressure.
    2. Distributes the clamping pressure more uniformly over a larger area. In this case, I would have a simple 2x4 cut to the length of the cab joint and apply multiple clamps.

    One of the most common errors, if not the most common error, in woodworking is not appropriately applying clamps. Hint: there is no such thing as too many clamps.

    #506 2 years ago
    Quoted from robotron911:

    Just an FYI from one of the pics in this post. You should always clamp using a block.
    The block does two things:
    1. Protects work piece from indentations from the clamp face. You don't have to over-tighten to get indentations. Softer woods and plywoods often are not hard enough to accept suitable clamping pressure.
    2. Distributes the clamping pressure more uniformly over a larger area. In this case, I would have a simple 2x4 cut to the length of the cab joint and apply multiple clamps.
    One of the most common errors, if not the most common error, in woodworking is not appropriately applying clamps. Hint: there is no such thing as too many clamps.

    Great points. Sometimes though the clamp is not large enough to accomodate the extra block as we've all found out in the past.

    #507 2 years ago

    Too also add- use parchment paper under blocks/clamps, etc to prevent glueing unwanted items together.

    #508 2 years ago
    Quoted from robotron911:

    Just an FYI from one of the pics in this post. You should always clamp using a block.
    The block does two things:
    1. Protects work piece from indentations from the clamp face. You don't have to over-tighten to get indentations. Softer woods and plywoods often are not hard enough to accept suitable clamping pressure.
    2. Distributes the clamping pressure more uniformly over a larger area. In this case, I would have a simple 2x4 cut to the length of the cab joint and apply multiple clamps.
    One of the most common errors, if not the most common error, in woodworking is not appropriately applying clamps. Hint: there is no such thing as too many clamps.

    Yep blocks (called Cauls by us woodworkers) help bring even pressure across a panel.

    When I did the test run (before applying glue), the parts locked perfectly together with no gaps at all with the clamps as shown.

    So I did not want to "fake it" when that is exactly all the repair needed.

    I've had other games that needed 5 total clamps & 2 Cauls to resquare the cab, so it's not one size fits all.

    I once fixed a cab with 2 ratchet straps and some waxed paper around the corner to keep the glue from forever sticking the the straps.

    It was in a restaurant and I did not have any tools with me except the straps, lol. The owner had some Elmers glue. Still holding to this day.

    I've got a SBM in the shop right now with the whole front panel off, I'll see what it takes to fix it, and post pics (of course).

    2 weeks later
    #509 2 years ago

    Two questions:

    How do you properly remove the metal security plate from a classic Bally?

    How do you quickly remove the panel? (since there isn't a need for these in home use)

    metal plate (resized).jpg

    #510 2 years ago
    Quoted from djblouw:

    Two questions:

    How do you properly remove the metal security plate from a classic Bally?

    How do you quickly remove the panel? (since there isn't a need for these in home use)

    It depends on if you are going to reuse it.

    If you are just making a new ghetto plate (usually out of a door kicker plate), then just pry it up with a screwdriver, then pull the staples out with a pair of Vise-Grips

    If you need to reuse it, put a heavy scraper under the plate and slowly lift it up, puling staples as you go.

    #511 2 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    It depends on if you are going to reuse it.
    If you are just making a new ghetto plate (usually out of a door kicker plate), then just pry it up with a screwdriver, then pull the staples out with a pair of Vise-Grips
    If you need to reuse it, put a heavy scraper under the plate and slowly lift it up, puling staples as you go.

    Thanks for the reply. I can get the nails out (with a little work). The problem is removing it from the machine. It doesn't want to flex/bend enough to pull it out, since its very rigid.

    My fear is the only way to remove it would be to cut the trim pieces holding it in around that area. But these also hold the floor in the cabinet.

    #512 2 years ago

    A router with an edge guide can remove 1/8" of the plywood lip on one side. Easily replaced latter.

    Or just sandblast it in place and reprime and repaint

    #513 2 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    A router with an edge guide can remove 1/8" of the plywood lip on one side. Easily replaced latter.
    Or just sandblast it in place and reprime and repaint

    Thanks for confirming. I was hoping there was a super secret way of removing this. I'll have to weigh my options for doing this.

    #514 2 years ago
    Quoted from djblouw:

    Thanks for confirming. I was hoping there was a super secret way of removing this. I'll have to weigh my options for doing this.

    Just like if I'm replacing the entire bottom, I rout off 1/8" lip from two adjoining side of the bottom of the cab.

    Easily replaced by wooden "windown screen molding" from the home center

    #515 2 years ago
    Quoted from djblouw:

    Two questions:
    How do you properly remove the metal security plate from a classic Bally?
    How do you quickly remove the panel? (since there isn't a need for these in home use)
    [quoted image]

    I just got one out by removing the T headed nails, then lifted it up enough to grab it with vice grips. I tapped the vice grips towards the back of the cabinet. Once it cracked free I pried up and out, the plate was fine. I trimmed the corners at the front a little and was able reinstall it.

    #516 2 years ago

    I ended up taking a sharpened scraper, and could split a couple layers of the plywood off the cabinet. This allowed for the plate to be removed without bending it. I'll end up putting the trim piece back on with window screen molding, as Vid mentioned.

    1 month later
    #517 1 year ago

    Just got a Diner.

    Outside artwork needs some TLC.

    As a first time pinball owner, I’m seeking some advice.

    Wondering just to leave it alone, attempt to touch it up, or just get new side art.

    07F333DF-7D73-44A9-8F22-3326B3432DBF (resized).jpeg63586441-5474-443B-AB1C-21BDA022153D (resized).jpeg125B8520-640F-4B72-8F45-018BCD10300C (resized).jpeg5493E98E-8DC9-4D0A-8D5E-A24CEFF33DBA (resized).jpeg8122C313-D3CA-47A3-92A9-3C1FE7D3408B (resized).jpegEF9CBC02-4A2F-40D8-9D33-843D620B4566 (resized).jpeg

    #518 1 year ago

    ^ that's going to be a big job!

    If it's your first pin, I'd play and enjoy it for a while, as is.

    Then after a year, you could get a stencil kit if you totally love the game.

    #519 1 year ago

    Vid, what would your approach be to this large hole in my TZ project cabinet? The game was definitely mistreated. possibly dropped off a loading dock. And at some point someone did some major damage with overtightened straps.

    The non pinball internet says popcicle sticks and wood putty. Would this be a better job for fiberglass resin?
    FJIMG_20180921_130842 (resized).jpgFJIMG_20180921_130117 (resized).jpg

    #520 1 year ago

    Vid, the local birch plywood(wanted to try this route before MDO, is the standard plywood sizing. So the 3/4" is not the full 3/4".

    The old williams cabinets had the full 3/4" wood. Is this something I can somewhat easily find or should I try and just use the 23/32”?

    #521 1 year ago
    Quoted from McSquid:

    The non pinball internet says popcicle sticks and wood putty. Would this be a better job for fiberglass resin?

    Wood putty will shrink way too much.

    I'd clean up the edges and scarf in a piece of plywood.

    Fill gaps with fiberglass resin, skim with easy to sand Bondo.

    Quoted from lordloss:

    Vid, the local birch plywood(wanted to try this route before MDO, is the standard plywood sizing. So the 3/4" is not the full 3/4".

    The old williams cabinets had the full 3/4" wood. Is this something I can somewhat easily find or should I try and just use the 23/32”?

    Some real plywood wholesalers have 3/4" Baltic Birch, but you don't need anything fancy for this patch.

    Find some MDF that's 3/4" and patch it in.

    3 weeks later
    #522 1 year ago

    I just got a Flash project, and I noticed some wierd splinter on the side of the cabinet. The inside doesn't show anything so it wasn't bent/broken. Any ideas on what would be a good way to go on this? pry off the splinters and fill with bondo or try and lift a little and squeeze some glue underneath and clamp or what?

    IMG_3803 (resized).jpgIMG_3805 (resized).jpg
    #523 1 year ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    I just got a Flash project, and I noticed some wierd splinter on the side of the cabinet. The inside doesn't show anything so it wasn't bent/broken. Any ideas on what would be a good way to go on this?

    That's some nice checking you got in that top layer.

    Poke under with an awl and see if there is a void.

    If not, then lift, glue and clamp. Bondo any remaining hole.

    If a void, fill with fiberglass resin (lay cab on it's side and fill void).

    #524 1 year ago

    well slight separated corner... i'll to see what the inside looks like next *_*

    20190110_082024 (resized).jpg

    #525 1 year ago
    Quoted from hisokajp:

    well slight separated corner... i'll to see what the inside looks like next *_*
    [quoted image]

    Just need a little gorilla tape

    #526 1 year ago
    Quoted from hisokajp:

    well slight separated corner... i'll to see what the inside looks like next *_*
    [quoted image]

    Snip off the nail brads and it should be an easy re-glue.

    At least most the damage is under the leg!

    #527 1 year ago

    Put the leg back on. No one is even going to notice that.

    #528 1 year ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    That's some nice checking you got in that top layer.
    Poke under with an awl and see if there is a void.
    If not, then lift, glue and clamp. Bondo any remaining hole.
    If a void, fill with fiberglass resin (lay cab on it's side and fill void).

    Thanks!

    #529 1 year ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Snip off the nail brads and it should be an easy re-glue.
    At least most the damage is under the leg!

    Agree, looks worse than it is

    #530 1 year ago

    Any tips on what to do about it this edge?

    I'd like to strengthen it up. It leaves a pile of chips underneath.

    IMG_20190112_223854 (resized).jpg
    #531 1 year ago
    Quoted from kcZ:

    Any tips on what to do about it this edge?
    I'd like to strengthen it up. It leaves a pile of chips underneath.
    [quoted image]

    I have soaked such particle board with wood glue with good results.

    #532 1 year ago
    Quoted from dasvis:

    I have soaked such particle board with wood glue with good results.

    I was tempted to do such thing... clamp it between some boards and soak it with glue. I'll give that a try first. My second thought was to cut it out and replace it but that just seems excessive.

    #533 1 year ago
    Quoted from kcZ:

    Any tips on what to do about it this edge?
    I'd like to strengthen it up. It leaves a pile of chips underneath.
    [quoted image]

    Fiberglass resin.

    AA94C4B0-906C-4031-9C68-D76E3928C38D (resized).jpegA886D9AB-96BD-4BA0-9CD6-F62F1F832D70 (resized).jpeg91CF9C68-1F41-4D79-87D2-4D8369647A07 (resized).jpeg61A5BB34-3565-414C-B9D6-B0C5E6C9ADBB (resized).jpeg13CEBA3E-3B9F-4AF6-970D-327810B2D5E6 (resized).jpeg

    1 month later
    #535 1 year ago
    Quoted from kcZ:

    Any tips on what to do about it this edge?
    I'd like to strengthen it up. It leaves a pile of chips underneath.
    [quoted image]

    Late the party, but I'd agree that fiberglass resin is probably the best in terms of strength. There is more work involved to finish the resin which may be a downside.

    Another alternative, that may be applicable here is a product from Minwax called Wood Hardener. You can get it at most big box stores or online. I've used it a fair amount on Arcade restorations with good success.

    https://www.minwax.com/wood-products/maintenance-repair/minwax-high-performance-wood-hardener

    1 week later
    #536 1 year ago

    I restored a roadshow and I have a question. I removed a sticker from each side of the head (on the inside). They were black. I filled and sanded the remains and painted it. My question is what are those black stickers called and where would i get them? I think the same type of sticker was used where i put side blades on the lower cabinet.

    #537 1 year ago
    Quoted from Juicerc51:

    I restored a roadshow and I have a question. I removed a sticker from each side of the head (on the inside). They were black. I filled and sanded the remains and painted it. My question is what are those black stickers called and where would i get them? I think the same type of sticker was used where i put side blades on the lower cabinet.

    Are you talking about these? They go over where the hinge bolt hole show inside the cabinet
    amazon.com link »

    #538 1 year ago

    No thats not it. It goes on the inside face of the side of the head. It was basically just a black vinyl sticker that was fairly thick. The picture shows where it was located.

    7C80A26A-111D-4A91-B89B-20C2A6D56B5C (resized).jpeg
    #539 1 year ago
    Quoted from Juicerc51:

    No thats not it. It goes on the inside face of the side of the head. It was basically just a black vinyl sticker that was fairly thick. The picture shows where it was located.
    [quoted image]

    Sounds like a non factory hack

    #540 1 year ago

    I wasnt planning on adding it back unless it was an OEM thing. Thanks.

    1 week later
    #541 1 year ago

    i think i have dealt with the separated corner and remaking a gusset however i have the back of the bottom panel deeping out. Looking at the back of the cabinet the whole lip and even cabinet bottom "flaked" off?

    20190310_170342 (resized).jpg

    reading your thread i saw the lip can be "Easily replaced by wooden "windown screen molding" from the home center ". Should I find the right size one at HD, then fix it on either side and what is left of the cabinet with nails before fixing the back of the cabinets? How best to attached the molding piece?

    #542 1 year ago

    Not an expert, but my cab had the same particle board rot there.
    I scraped out all the weakened material and built a form fronted with wax paper. (as Vid has already described)
    Then I filled that up with Bondo fiber reinforced filler. (it took about 2/3 of a can to fill it)
    Bondo Fiber (resized).JPG
    That stuff is green while wet, but drys dark brown.
    It looks and sands like wood when dry. (really a lot stronger than the particle board)
    Don't forget to drive in some long wood screws down into the healthy fiber board before you poor in Bondo to hold it together.
    (Vid has described that already)
    BTW, only do all that work if the cab is really worth saving.
    Mine came out fine and the repair is not noticeable.

    #543 1 year ago

    I routed the particle up about 2" and about 1/2" deep. I cut a piece of plywood with a rabbet cut and glued and screwed it to cabinet. Then I finished it with bondo

    #544 1 year ago

    Glue and clamp it in place

    20190303_143734 (resized).jpg20190303_143743 (resized).jpg
    #545 1 year ago

    Vid -

    I was going to use fiberglass resin on the back of this cab (and corner). It is my first time using resin. I usually bondo. I intend on putting a stern cabinet protector over this corner once I'm done. My question is this: Would it be o.k. to put a screw through the resin (for the cabinet protector) or will it crack? Apologies for the poor pics...

    20190306_203222 (resized).jpg20190306_203227 (resized).jpg20190306_203230 (resized).jpgcp (resized).jpg
    1 month later
    #546 1 year ago

    Saving the rest of the pic deck for when I post the total restore, but here's a sneak peek of my first fiberglass corner restore. I'm proud of my first effort. (pre-sanding down)

    Thanks for the step-by-step tips, vid!!!
    -mof
    20190428_231857 (resized).jpg

    #547 1 year ago
    Quoted from 2Fun:

    Vid -
    I was going to use fiberglass resin on the back of this cab (and corner). It is my first time using resin. I usually bondo. I intend on putting a stern cabinet protector over this corner once I'm done. My question is this: Would it be o.k. to put a screw through the resin (for the cabinet protector) or will it crack? Apologies for the poor pics...
    [quoted image][quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

    I bet it would crack. That fibreglass is tough but brittle, man, that doesn't make sense, but it does. hmmm.

    Quoted from mof:

    Saving the rest of the pic deck for when I post the total restore, but here's a sneak peek of my first fiberglass corner restore. I'm proud of my first effort. (pre-sanding down)
    Thanks for the step-by-step tips, vid!!!

    -mof
    [quoted image]

    Nice corner mof, i'm going to fire up a cab refurb soon and plan on fibreglass corner repairs again on my WW

    #548 1 year ago
    Quoted from northerndude:

    I bet it would crack. That fibreglass is tough but brittle, man, that doesn't make sense, but it does. hmmm.

    Nice corner mof, i'm going to fire up a cab refurb soon and plan on fibreglass corner repairs again on my WW

    Pre-drill and you should be fine. If you tighten enough to crack cured fiberglass resin backed by wood, then you are likely overtightening the screw/bolt.

    #549 1 year ago

    This vid really helped me see the whole process of using Bondo on wood, which I'm about to do for the first time.
    I really like the move of laying down the painter's tape, and shaping the bondo while it's still drying... Look forward to trying that!

    #550 1 year ago
    Quoted from mof:

    This vid really helped me see the whole process of using Bondo on wood, which I'm about to do for the first time.
    I really like the move of laying down the painter's tape, and shaping the bondo while it's still drying... Look forward to trying that!

    THX mof!! That was really good to see. Looks to be much cleaner, and maybe easier than the fiberglass I was using, I believe they both have their uses individually but man, I might have to go with the "bondo" also on my next cabinet refurb.

    The fibreglass was so rank smelling in my garage i couldn't believe it.

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