(Topic ID: 93211)

Burned J115 G.I. Connector replacement on WPC (Bop)


By Chet

6 years ago



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  • 50 posts
  • 15 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by smoothbore19
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WPC Bop J115 Connector.jpg

#1 6 years ago

As shown on the photo, the "Ac power in" J115 connector housing on my Bride of Pinbot is burned and I am going to replace it with a new housing and new header pins. It is a 12 pin housing with the 9th pin being the key pin. Note that several of the pins have two wires including the one that is burned the worst. This connector looks like it had been replaced at some time also. I already removed the 12 pin header and soldered in a new one. I ordered some "high current" Molex Trifurcon crimp contacts from Ed and Greatplains Pinball. Pinwiki says to use these type of "box" crimp contacts instead of the standard ones for this connector because of the higher 13 amp rating.
Question I have is how is best way to install /Crimp two wires to a single contact pin? Pinwiki says "Do not use solder on a crimped pin connector; it changes the temper of the connector pin which allows oxygen to penetrate the wire bundle, allowing oxidation." However, some of the other repair guides and videos say to remove the wire insulation, slightly tin the wires together, crimp and then re-heat the crimp with a solder iron (but don't add more solder).

Thanks for any tips, comments, ideas on how to best make this repair.

WPC Bop J115 Connector.jpg

#2 6 years ago

There are a lot of opinions on this, but mine is that using the original IDC connectors is fine for home use, and is less likely to produce crappy crimps like the one you see on the pin third from the right in that picture. IDC is much easier to use for newbies.

If using Trifurcon terminals, however, I use a separate piece of wire and don't try to stuff two wires into the same crimp terminal. It's hard to explain in words, and I don't have pictures handy.

1. Put a piece of heat-shrink tubing on the original wire.
2. Crimp one terminal on the original wire.
3. About 2" back on the original wire, use wire strippers to cut into the insulation and spread apart about 1/8" inch, exposing the wire, but not cutting the wire.
4. Using a new piece of wire ~2" long, make a hook to loop around the exposed wire.
5. Solder the two wires together.
6. Slide the heat-shrink into place over the splice and shrink it.
7. Crimp a second terminal onto the new piece of wire.

#3 6 years ago

Thanks Herg for your comments and suggestions. For information, I already had switched to LEDs in the backbox and also on the PF GI, so that will reduce the amperage from the transformer, I would think. I also replaced the header pins for J121 which is the GI output connector to the PF. I am going to replace the connector on J121 as it is slightly burned on one of the pins. In my picture the, third pin that is burned the original incoming wire from the transformer was just jammed along side the other wire that is crimped, the incoming power wire was not crimped, just jammed in there beside the crimped wire.

In ref., to your comments above, I can see how a new IDC connector might be a good solution since the current molex connector has the two wires in several of the pins that just jump to other pins on the header. I could use IDC and just loop the incoming power wires to the other pins on a new IDC connector instead of using two wires and the crimp molex connector housing. Is that pretty accurate?

#4 6 years ago

The best way to fix these, IMO, is with a secondary cable from a later machine, where the pins of J115 are all home-runs to the transformer instead of looped.

Pics that help explain:

Original WPC era secondary transformer connector:

photo 3 (Small).JPG

Later WPC era secondary transformer connector:
photo 1 (Small).JPG

Later WPC era driver board connector:
photo 4 (Small).JPG

Couple ways to accomplish this...

Easiest way, but costs more:

Ask Jim Shird to make you one. Either a complete secondary harness, or just the transformer output to J115.

http://www.jimspinballshop.com/contact/

Cheaper, DIY way:

You could convert the one you have, out of the game, on your workbench, pretty easily.

You'll need some .093 crimp pins, some .156 trifurcons, most likely a new housing for J115, keying pin for the new housing, and some wire.

Remove the entire secondary harness from the machine

Measure the existing wire from xformer to J115, the wires should all be about the same length. Add an inch or two for wiggle room. The parts breakdown for Dirty Harry specifies 47 inches *per run* - but you need 2 runs for some colors

BAA sells the 'right' wire to get the colors original and everything! For this application, you want 18 gauge wire.

HW-30018-49 - Yellow with White Stripe. You need 47 inches
HW-30018-91 - White with Brown Stripe. You need 94 inches (2 pcs, 47 inches each)
HW-30018-1 - Brown wire. You need 94 inches (2 pcs, 47 inches each)
HW-30018-93 - White with Orange Stripe. You need 47 inches.
HW-30018-5 - Green wire. You need 47 inches.
HW-30018-94 - White with Yellow Stripe. You need 94 inches (2 pcs, 47 inches each)
HW-30018-3 - Orange. You need 94 inches (2 pcs, 47 inches each)

It comes in 10 foot lengths for about $3 per color. A 10 foot length is 120 inches, so 10 feet of all 7 colors will suffice. Yeah, it's $21 or so, but that's just a few LEDs, right?

Cut the wire into the 47 inch lengths, and put a .156 trifurcon pin on one end of each cable.

In the case of the 4 wires where you have 2 47 inch lengths (orange, white with yellow stripe, brown, brown with white stripe), strip the ends of those wires, twist them together, and carefully crimp them both into a .093 pin.

In the case of the other 3 wires (yellow w/white stripe, white with orange stripe, and green), crimp the single end into a .093 pin.

If you take your 03-09-2092 molex connector housing and remove all the wires from it (or start with a new one, preferably), you can turn it sideways so the 3 'teeth' are facing to the left. The top left pin is pin 1, bottom left is pin 3, top right is pin 7, bottom right is pin 9.

Pin 1 - White with Brown Stripe (pair)
Pin 2 - No Connection
Pin 3 - Brown (pair)
Pin 4 - White with orange stripe
Pin 5 - Yellow with white stripe wire
Pin 6 - Green wire
Pin 7 - White with yellow stripe (pair)
Pin 8 - No Connection
Pin 9 - Orange wire (pair)

Then, take a new 12 pin .156 housing. Insert a keying pin at pin 9. Insert the wires as follows:

Pin 1 - Yellow wire, white stripe
Pin 2 - White wire, brown stripe
Pin 3 - White wire, brown stripe
Pin 4 - White wire, orange stripe
Pin 5 - White wire, yellow stripe
Pin 6 - White wire, yellow stripe
Pin 7 - Orange wire
Pin 8 - Orange wire
Pin 9 - Key
Pin 10 - Green wire
Pin 11 - Brown Wire
Pin 12 - Brown wire

#5 6 years ago
Quoted from Chet:

the incoming power wire was not crimped, just jammed in there beside the crimped wire.

I would be willing to wager that it was crimped at one time, it came loose, then it got jammed back in there. As you know, the crimp terminals are not designed for more than one wire, so you almost always end up with a poor job when you try to do it.

Quoted from Chet:

Is that pretty accurate?

Yeah, that describes my thoughts on it. Whether you use an IDC with loops or a crimped housing with a splice, avoid two wires in one terminal. Others will have different opinions, but it's way easier to screw it up than it is to get a good result.

Finally, John's suggestion is definitely a great way to handle it, but obviously, it is more work.

#6 6 years ago

Waste .25 cents and practice your crimping on some same gauge wire.

Don't make your first crimps on the actual machine.

Read this before you start:

http://www.pinrepair.com/connect/

#7 6 years ago

I have been able to accomplish this by removing several strands from each wire to make the over all diameter of the two wires smaller. Then, without twisting them together, just sandwiched together, crimp as usual. I've only done this once or twice but it worked for me.

#8 6 years ago

Thanks for the great input on this. I have done crimps using single wire molex trifurcon pins and housings with no problem but have not run into this situation so It's really good to see some options on how to rehabilitate this.

My secondary harness is like the one you show John for early WPC games with the just the seven yellow/white strip wires running to the J115 connector from the transformer connector. Since my game is BoP, it is a very early WPC game. I like the idea of just replacing that entire secondary harness with the later version with the eleven dedicated colored wires running to a new connector at J115 instead of the loops, etc. Your detailed DIY way to accomplish this is very clear.

#9 6 years ago

I got the wire, the connector plug, and some .093 crimp pins ordered so I will hopeful tackle this in a week or so. Are there any tips on crimping the two wires into the single pin. I ordered the 14awg -18awg .093 crimp pins. Do you crimp the insulation of both wires or just crimp using both the condutor and insulation crimps on the stripped wire?

#10 6 years ago

The factory harness has both insulations in the crimp.

I'd make a few test crimps on scrap wire of the same gauge with some of the pins. Hopefully you ordered more than the 7 it takes

#11 6 years ago
Quoted from Chet:

Are there any tips on crimping the two wires into the single pin

http://www.pinrepair.com/connect/

#12 6 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

The factory harness has both insulations in the crimp.
I'd make a few test crimps on scrap wire of the same gauge with some of the pins. Hopefully you ordered more than the 7 it takes

Thanks, John, Yes, I ordered a bunch of the pins and sockets (50 each) for both sizes (wire gauge ranges), plus an .093 contact extraction tool from Ed.

03-09-2092 Connector, Plug, 9-Pin, 0.093" $0.55 5
03-09-1094 Connector, Receptacle, 9-Pin, 0.093" $0.55 5
02-09-1119 Crimp Contact, 0.093", Socket $0.10 50
02-09-1104 Crimp Contact, 0.093", Socket $0.12 50
02-09-2118 Crimp Contact, 0.093", Pin $0.10 50
02-09-2103 Crimp Contact, 0.093", Pin $0.12 50
W-HT-2038 Contact Extraction Tool, 0.093" $15.00 1

I already have the following hand Crimpers:
Waldom W-HT-1921-P
Waldom W-HT-1919
Mac Tools TCT 1028
I will have to experiment to see which of these is best for the .093 pins.

#13 6 years ago

This is a pretty good discussion regarding crimping two wires into a single pin, but this discussion specifically recommends that the insulation tabs on the pin be used to crimp the conductor in addition to the conductor part of the crimp..... See quoted text below:

"The second trick is to use the insulation-grabbing part of the terminal pin as an added area for the stranded wires. Because the insulation-grabbing portion of a crimped terminal pin is larger, this additional area handles the two wire together fairly well, without spilling-over the stranded wires outside of the crimp. Though this is definately not how to do a proper crimp, in this situation there really is no alternative. Note a bit of practice is needed to get a feel for this "illegal" crimp."

1 week later
#14 6 years ago

Update, I ordered the new wire for the secondary harness and removed the harness from the game. Measured the wire lengths and as it turns out, my wire runs are a full 74 inches long instead of being 47 inches long!! I had to order more of the 10' lengths of some of the wire colors in order to have enough. I guess some machines must be significantly different than others as far as harness wire lengths... No big deal, just measure the actual wire lengths first...

1 week later
#15 6 years ago

Update: Completed secondary harness using "home run" full length wires from J115 to transformer. Used new Molex connector and plug on ends and high current molex crimp contact pins and sockets. Next step is to remove old harness wires from the existing secondary harness, tie wrap on the new one to existing harness and install back into game.

#16 6 years ago

Nice job on the harness!! that should last basically forever.

I've fixed these using the "factory" original harness both by crimping two wires, and splicing in a wire split (1 wire to 2 wires, then each crimped individually) ... both have lasted w/out failing.

I'm a little confused, though, on the comment about don't solder crimps because soldering allows oxidation into the wire. What do you think happens on the other end of all the wires going to the playfield?

Soldering the crimps should be fine. Yeah, it's overkill, but it should be fine. You need to make sure you don't let any solder flow into the connector part, and you need to watch the heat, to make sure you don't affect the plating ... but there shouldn't be anything to prevent you soldering the crimps, if you desire to.

#17 6 years ago

I was just quoting what is written on the Pinwiki repair page. I would like to know more about that myself..

#18 6 years ago

What I've always heard about trifurcons is, when properly crimped (and that's a key phrase right there), the current carrying capacity of the crimp should easily handle the load presented. Therefore solder is not required.

I've always soldered them, though ... not necessarily for added current carrying capacity, but for mechanical reasons : it's a stiffer, sturdier connection when you do that.

#19 6 years ago

If you solder a crimped connection, it takes a flexible wire and makes it solid. Brittle. A place where the wire will fracture or break.

#20 6 years ago
Quoted from Chet:

Update: Completed secondary harness using "home run" full length wires from J115 to transformer. Used new Molex connector and plug on ends and high current molex crimp contact pins and sockets. Next step is to remove old harness wires from the existing secondary harness, tie wrap on the new one to existing harness and install back into game.

photo (19).JPG 139 KB

Nice work!

I'd also take some 4 inch cable ties, and tie your new GI input harness every 4-6 inches.

#21 6 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

If you solder a crimped connection, it takes a flexible wire and makes it solid. Brittle. A place where the wire will fracture or break.

Well, maybe ... any worse/better than the stiff edge of the crimp itself? I bet it's a wash, one against the other.

I've seen many, many crimped connectors where the copper's cracked and broken right at the crimp.

Every single solder point under the playfield has the same issue with stiff solder, after all.

#22 6 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

Nice work!
I'd also take some 4 inch cable ties, and tie your new GI input harness every 4-6 inches.

Done,
GI input harness joined together with new cable ties placed at the same locations (4-6'') where the original ties were located. It's a bigger wire bundle now because of the extra "home run wires". Hope my black corrugated plastic panduit covers the cables into the backbox. Old secondary cable is at top, completed GI input cable is at bottom of picture. Finishing up on the power driver board which I removed from game to put new header pins at the GI connectors and other locations. Any suggestions for which header pins for connectors should be replaced?

photo (20).JPG

#23 6 years ago

J115 (obviously) and J120 and J121 are the usual suspects for burning. I had some trouble with J101 on my board but I don't know if that's a common problem spot.

#24 6 years ago

With the age of these games, J101 is going to increasingly be an issue ...

It doesn't draw enough to burn as quickly as the GI circuits, but that's logic and lamp power, so time is catching up.

#25 6 years ago

So here are the header pins I am replacing so far: J119, J120, J120 (GI for Coin door, insert panel and Playfield), J128, J129, J131, J132 (low power and high-power solenoids) and J101. These all had some tarnished pins.. Others?

#26 6 years ago

Look at J115 also, that's the secondary input to the GI circuits.

The coin door GI, and solenoid headers probably are OK and don't need replacing, even if a bit tarnished.

They're not "always on" like the secondary plugs, and the GI output.

It won't hurt anything to replace them, but it's just more work for you.

On the J115, J120/121, and J101 make sure you replace the plug too, with new Trifurcon connections.

#27 6 years ago

Yeah, I forgot to include J115 header and connector. I did that one first. I used high current molex crimp contacts (box shaped) and the correct molex connector plugs (see completed harness picture above). I will be replacing the IDC connectors on all the GI connectors with Trifurcon crimp contacts and molex connector plugs as well. thanks.

#28 6 years ago

Cool ... pics when it's all done!

#29 6 years ago

Pictures of installed complete new secondary GI input harness, new header pins and connectors for J115, J119, J120, J121, and secondary J101. Black colored header pins are new ones.

photo (24).JPG

photo (23).JPG

photo (22).JPG

#31 6 years ago

Thank you John for your great help, very detailed instructions, wire and connector information for complete fabrication of the new secondary GI harness.
Lyn

#32 6 years ago

That should go a long way to not only fixing the GI issues, but also preventing future game reset issues.

6 months later
#33 5 years ago

Wanted to revive an old thread.

Discovered J115 was burnt on my T2 this week, and figured I'd follow my own advice, and update the harness properly. So, I ordered the wire from Planetary, made a couple harnesses, and installed one, figuring the 2nd one could be a spare.

Fixed the problem right up - but I realized the harness seemed a little short when compared to original.

Then, it hit me

Dirty Harry is a WPC-S game, where the xformer mounts to the rear of the cabinet.

Games made before WPC-S had the transformer mid way in the cabinet - behind the cashbox. So, 47 inches per run is too short!

Referencing the Twilight Zone parts list on IPDB, it appears each wire needs to be 79 inches, not 47. So, 47 inches is almost 3 feet too short!

I'd recommend if you were making your own harness, you might want to measure the harness that's in your game, and add an inch or two. The wire is inexpensive, so it won't break the bank...

At 47 inches, it still reached but the wire isn't properly routed through all the clips. I'll get more wire with my next planetary order and try again

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#34 5 years ago

At what point do you know if your header pins are stuffed, needing replacing

#35 5 years ago

If the female connector is browned or burnt, replace the male header

If the male connector is tarnished, charred or burnt, replace it.

A small flashlight in your toolkit is very valuable. Shine it on the headers. How do they look?

7 months later
#36 4 years ago

So how much did making your own harness cost? I'm debating making my own or purchasing one from Jimspinballshop.com. It looks like he sells them for $50.

3 weeks later
#37 4 years ago

Cost was just get get the correct wire color/gauge from Bay Area Amusements to run from the transformer to the backbox. I already had all the molex connector pins and sockets, crimpers, and molex housings and new board header pins, and the nylon wire ties for the new GI secondary harness Maybe 10-12 bucks for all the wire that I needed.

#38 4 years ago

This could work also i suppose and would be much easier.
I used this method in the 90's on the always burned system 11 interconnect boards.
Only needs single trifurcon crimped wires.
Can also be made undone very easily.

20150927_111150.jpg

#39 4 years ago
Quoted from cudabee:

This could work also i suppose and would be much easier.
I used this method in the 90's on the always burned system 11 interconnect boards.
Only needs single trifurcon crimped wires.
Can also be made undone very easily.

20150927_111150.jpg

VERY CLEVER!!!!!

#40 4 years ago

Yeah, I did the solder bridge across the back of the pins also, in addition to running new harness, header pins and molex connector. Maybe overkill but what the heck.

2 months later
#41 4 years ago

Just found this post John. Helpful for what I am about to do with my j115 conversion.

1 year later
-1
#42 3 years ago

did anyone make an extra cable
i could use one

10 months later
#43 2 years ago

Just found this thread. I'm new to pinball. I have Demo Man, T2, and World Poker Tour. T2 being the one that needed the most work. The T2 driver board is hacked up at J115. I am going to order a new Rottendog board for it, then see about having the original fixed if possible. Does anyone know a place where I can buy a plug and play ready wiring harness for the J115 plug? I think it would be easier for me then try and fix the old one. V/R

#44 2 years ago
Quoted from smoothbore19:

Just found this thread. I'm new to pinball. I have Demo Man, T2, and World Poker Tour. T2 being the one that needed the most work. The T2 driver board is hacked up at J115. I am going to order a new Rottendog board for it, then see about having the original fixed if possible. Does anyone know a place where I can buy a plug and play ready wiring harness for the J115 plug? I think it would be easier for me then try and fix the old one. V/R

Fix the original board and pass on the Rottendog, which has been having spotty quality problems and some people have had issues getting the driver board working correctly in TZ.

No replacement P/P ready wiring harness available. Replace the J115 wired connector with crimped .156" triforicon molex pins/housing and the .156" male header PCB strip.

#45 2 years ago

I don't have the skills to fix the board myself. Are there any reputable places I can send the board to get fixed?

#46 2 years ago

Could you post a picture of the J115 area? chrishibler will be happy to repair it for you. Much cheaper than buying a new board.

#47 2 years ago

FYI. The wiring from J115 goes to one of the back connector on the backside of the transformer.

#48 2 years ago

Here is a pic as it is now.

20180104_195459 (resized).jpg

#49 2 years ago

If you send out the driver board, send the MPU with it to install NVRAM. You will be happy to be battery free. http://www.pinitech.com/products/6264_nvram.php

#50 2 years ago

NVRAM is def in the plans. I doo have a remote battery holder for the T2 and Demo man. I have new ICD connectors and wire coming in. I think Ill try and put together a new wire set for the J115 once I have the board fixed. I looked wire connector for J115 at the transformer it has two slight burn marks. This machine has all LEDs. So hopefully that helps with heat. Thank for all the info

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