(Topic ID: 317812)

Brass sleeves in flipper coil

By Silverstreak02

2 years ago


Topic Heartbeat

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  • 19 posts
  • 16 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by Quercus22
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    #1 2 years ago

    I’m working on my Around the World pin and discovered there are brass sleeves in the upper flipper coils. I’d like to replace them with the nylon ones, but they appear to be stuck. Are they removable? If so what is the trick?

    #2 2 years ago

    Tap the sleeve out with a correspondingly sized nut driver.

    #3 2 years ago

    You're more likely to destroy the coil than get the sleeve out.

    #4 2 years ago

    Use an 11/32" nut driver. You can tap the nut driver with a hammer to remove the sleeve. Most times this works unless the coil is already damaged by heat.

    #5 2 years ago

    I would give the brass sleeve a drop of wd40 and let it soak in and then try the nut driver method. Be sure to support the other end of the coil as you tap it out or you will destroy the coil. Make sure to remove the wd40 residue off afterward for obvious reasons

    #6 2 years ago

    If the brass sleeves are undamaged are they a better option than the nylon?

    #7 2 years ago

    Nylon sleeves will be better here. Likely there will be some wear on the brass that will result in more friction vs nylon.

    #8 2 years ago

    Anybody ever polish the inside of a brass sleeve with a dremel polishing attachment tool or something and make it shiny again? If somebody was real picky about it being original but wanted to make it as slick as possible.

    #9 2 years ago
    Quoted from allsportdvd:

    If the brass sleeves are undamaged are they a better option than the nylon?

    No. Coils pull the plunger to one side. Eventually wearing through a metal ( brass or aluminum ) sleeve and into the coil windings, shorting it out.

    I've never seen that kind of wear in a nylon sleeve.

    LTG : )

    #10 2 years ago

    I always clean the brass sleeve and plunger with rubbing alcohol and reassemble. I’ve never replaced a brass sleeve and have never had any problems. I have seen nylon sleeves worn through.

    #11 2 years ago
    Quoted from frenchmarky:

    Anybody ever polish the inside of a brass sleeve with a dremel polishing attachment tool or something and make it shiny again? If somebody was real picky about it being original but wanted to make it as slick as possible.

    I have done this. Never had any issues with it afterwards. Just make sure its extra clean after polishing by going through it with an alcohol wipe or three. I have little doubt that it will wear through eventually as LTG said, but nylon ones also need to be replaced so… I also polish the plunger or replace it. I was never able to get the sleeves to pop out, thus I made due with what I had

    #12 2 years ago

    I used to try (emphasis on the try) to replace brass sleeves. Occasionally they will slide right out. Most of the time they range from difficult to get out to impossible to remove. It's just not worth the effort and the possibility of destroying a coil. Unless that brass sleeve is scratched or damaged, you probably won't see any difference anyway.

    I've replaced damaged coil sleeves, both nylon and brass, because I had no choice, but I don't even replace nylon sleeves anymore unless I see signs of wear or damage. I think people just get stuck on the idea of: "Well their only 50 cents, I'll just replace them while I've got this apart". That's fine if you can push it out with little effort, but that's usually not the case with most brass sleeves.

    Just one more thing that follows my, if it ain't broke don't fix it policy

    #13 2 years ago

    I recall changing a brass one to nylon on purpose once, but the plunger had actually worn all the way thru the brass in one area, now *that's* friction! Plunger probably had some mushrooming on the end that helped it along

    #14 2 years ago
    Quoted from Vintage-Pinball:

    I would give the brass sleeve a drop of wd40 and let it soak in and then try the nut driver method. Be sure to support the other end of the coil as you tap it out or you will destroy the coil. Make sure to remove the wd40 residue off afterward for obvious reasons

    Might also "try" putting the coil/sleeve in the fridge for awhile. Theoretically, the metal should contract while the plastic coil bobbin should be relatively inert.

    #15 2 years ago

    I like the nut driver option the best. Aside from the fact I have a generous friend who made me a custom coil sleeve remover tool.

    You’ll have better luck and leverage if you remove the coil from the machine first. Less chance of damaging the coil, the machine, or yourself. Don’t ask how I know.

    I like to put on a bench vice (on, not in) and open it enough to let the sleeve fall through the gap but closed enough to hold the coil.

    #16 2 years ago
    Quoted from EJS:

    You’ll have better luck and leverage if you remove the coil from the machine first. Less chance of damaging the coil, the machine, or yourself. Don’t ask how I know.

    And have a good sense of humor if it comes apart like a slinky.

    LTG : )

    #17 2 years ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    And have a good sense of humor if it comes apart like a slinky.
    LTG : )

    Yup, I found that out the hard way with a Williams wood rail. I assumed all sleeves were removable. Nope.

    Dave

    1 week later
    #18 2 years ago
    Quoted from Grandnational007:

    Tap the sleeve out with a correspondingly sized nut driver.

    Thanks for the suggestion. I removed the coil, supported one side with a large socket and used a smaller one with a hammer to drive the bushing out. It worked great.

    #19 2 years ago

    The way I do it is to cut it out (carefully) with a junior hacksaw.

    Put the blade in first then attach the hacksaw frame and cut along the length of the sleeve.

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