(Topic ID: 163782)

BoP: Father and Son's First Restoration [COMPLETE]


By jsa

3 years ago



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There are 450 posts in this topic. You are on page 7 of 9.
#301 2 years ago

Problem solved.

IMG_3725 (resized).JPG

#302 2 years ago

We received my 2.0 kit (batch 3) today. Again, we plan on fully restoring the 1.0 functionality before we put in the 2.0 upgrade. The only real exception to this is the cabinet speaker.

My challenge with all-things-audio is I'm somewhat of a sound snob. With my first pin, a ToM, I completed the speaker upgrade process that is outlined here:

http://www.dziedzic.us/wpc_speaker_replacement.html

The difference was night and day, a major improvement in the sound quality. We would do the same for my BoP, but knowing that we will likely eventually be putting in the 2.0 speaker panel, we feel like it would be a waste of time.

The kit came with Flipper Fidelity speakers on the new speaker panel and an 8" Flipper Fidelity speaker for the cabinet. The speaker has a thick foam ring integrated into the speaker, which does create some space for the throw, but it doesn't change the fact that the BoP cabinet has an opening for a 6" speaker. Our plan would be to install the Flipper Fidelity cabinet speaker and for now, plug it into the existing system. The challenge with this approach is that we won't be satisfied unless the hole in the cabinet matches the speaker, and also that we add an MDF mounting block.

The last time I did this, I took a hand-held jigsaw and cut the hole larger in the cabinet. I used the process here:

http://www.dziedzic.us/wpc_speaker_8_cabinet.html#newmountingblock

Honestly, it was really challenging for me to make a smooth cut. Does anyone have any tips on a better way to make the cut? It's not like there is any margin for error here. My default method will be to take the mounting block and trace the hole with a pencil, then cut the hole larger with a jigsaw.

Also, I struggled with making the mounting block without breaking it. I did after a few tries, but I'll be honest, I'm sure someone with better tools could do this better than we could. I don't suppose I could pay anyone out there would be willing to fashion me a proper mounting block (designed to go over the correct size hole) in MDF? I see Flipper Fidelity sells adapter plates here:

http://flipperfidelity.com/parts-and-diy/wood-and-plastic-adaptors/8-square-wood-adaptor-for-williams-bally-and-data-east.html

The problem with this is that it's designed for adapting to the smaller hole, not simply serve as a proper mounting block for the 8" hole.

You guys tell me, am I over-thinking this?

#303 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

The kit came with Flipper Fidelity speakers on the new speaker panel and an 8" Flipper Fidelity speaker for the cabinet. The speaker has a thick foam ring integrated into the speaker, which does create some space for the throw, but it doesn't change the fact that the BoP cabinet has an opening for a 6" speaker. Our plan would be to install the Flipper Fidelity cabinet speaker and for now, plug it into the existing system. The challenge with this approach is that we won't be satisfied unless the hole in the cabinet matches the speaker, and also that we add an MDF mounting block.
The last time I did this, I took a hand-held jigsaw and cut the hole larger in the cabinet. I used the process here:
http://www.dziedzic.us/wpc_speaker_8_cabinet.html#newmountingblock
Honestly, it was really challenging for me to make a smooth cut. Does anyone have any tips on a better way to make the cut? It's not like there is any margin for error here. My default method will be to take the mounting block and trace the hole with a pencil, then cut the hole larger with a jigsaw.

I forgot, did you put solid wood on the bottom of the cabinet? If so:

See if a local equipment rental store has one of these for rent:

amazon.com link »

Alternate plan? Just drop the $59 and buy one. You know this isn't the last time you'll need to cut an 8" hole. Admitting you have a problem is the first step to recovery.

Depending on which one you get, some of them say they work on MDF and particle board, too (if you cut slowly).

#304 2 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

I forgot, did you put solid wood on the bottom of the cabinet? If so:
See if a local equipment rental store has one of these for rent:
amazon.com link »
Alternate plan? Just drop the $59 and buy one. You know this isn't the last time you'll need to cut an 8" hole. Admitting you have a problem is the first step to recovery.

The cabinet has MDF as the bottom of the cabinet. I had no idea this tool existed. Do you think it will work on MDF? It also solves my problem fabricating a mounting block. Hmm!

#305 2 years ago

Me, I would either cut corners and live with a messy imperfect hole hidden by the speaker OR try to make the cut using a small round plate and a cutter/xacto knife, OR use the Dremel Moto saw I just purchased to make the cut. Probably option 3.

#306 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

The cabinet has MDF as the bottom of the cabinet. I had no idea this tool existed. Do you think it will work on MDF? It also solves my problem fabricating a mounting block. Hmm!

Some of the tools of this type say they work on MDF, but you have to go slow. I'd probably try it on scrap first, and tape the surface with painter's tape before cutting.

1 week later
#307 2 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

Some of the tools of this type say they work on MDF, but you have to go slow. I'd probably try it on scrap first, and tape the surface with painter's tape before cutting.

FYI, I've been traveling in southeast asia for work (no freaking pinball anywhere, by the way, it's not at all ok) but we'll be back at this soon. The next step is going to be fabricating a MDF mounting block for the new 8" cabinet speaker, enlarging the cabinet speaker hole, installing the crossover for the speaker...disassembling the speaker panel, enlarging the speaker panel holes for 6 1/2" speakers, fabricating a new wiring harness for the speakers, etc etc... Once all of that is done, I'll finish reassembling the backbox and begin the playfield teardown.

#308 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

FYI, I've been traveling in southeast asia for work (no freaking pinball anywhere, by the way, it's not at all ok)

Yeah, pinball never really caught on in Asia. It's extremely hard to find, even in an electronics mecca like Japan where you think it would be all over the place (even though pachinko and game arcades certainly are!).

#309 2 years ago

Fabricating the mounting plate for the new speaker using a circle cutter. The end result is acceptable:

IMG_3958 (resized).JPG

The problem is that circle cutters (at least the one I used) have a maximum depth of about .25". This requires you flip over the MDF to meet at the middle. It then "bevels" the cut slightly so you have to sand the inside:

IMG_3959 (resized).JPG

Anyway, that part complete, it's always scary and fun to cut a hole in a standing pinball machine. NOT.

IMG_0076.JPG (resized).jpeg

My son opted to have me make the cut.

#310 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

My son opted to have me make the cut.

I would have too.

J/K. It is coming out great!

#311 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Fabricating the mounting plate for the new speaker using a circle cutter. The end result is acceptable:

The problem is that circle cutters (at least the one I used) have a maximum depth of about 1.25". This requires you flip over the MDF to meet at the middle. It then "bevels" the cut slightly so you have to sand the inside:

Anyway, that part complete, it's always scary and fun to cut a hole in a standing pinball machine. NOT.

My son opted to have me make the cut.

That worked out pretty well. Congrats!

#312 2 years ago

Now for properly installing the mounting plate and speaker hardware.

First, we need to countersink the speaker screws. They are long enough for most speakers, but the Flipper Fidelity speaker that was sent as part of a BoP 2.0 kit has a thick foam ring to create a strong seal. As such, at least 1/8" additional length would be necessary, so we countersink the screws:

IMG_3999 (resized).JPG

So now we have four speaker screws with just enough length to grab the new cabinet speaker:

IMG_4001 (resized).JPG

We also countersink the screws to mount the plate, so the speaker grille sits flush with the plate:

IMG_4003 (resized).JPG

Then we add the speaker grille. We are using a new metal grille, as the plastic ones I've found from Marco and others were either too small or too weak. The original one was metal, so why not use metal again? Note that in this photo we haven't put the ground braid back around the speaker screw under the grill yet, we were just making sure everything fit properly.

IMG_4005 (resized).JPG

Here's the finished product. We also installed a 100hz crossover with spacers. With BoP 1.0, we'll be using this along with a new speaker wiring harness and upgraded speakers in the speaker panel (following Tony's how-to here: http://www.dziedzic.us/wpc_speaker_replacement.html). I realize that when we install BoP 2.0 components this will be bypassed, as BoP 2.0 has an amplifier with a crossover inside of it (which is why the Flipper Fidelity doesn't come with the usual crossover). However, since we're restoring BoP 1.0 to the max before we do anything remotely 2.0, we want this machine in better-than-new 1.0 condition first!

Next stop: Restoring the speaker panel.

IMG_4010 (resized).JPG

#313 2 years ago

And so it begins.

IMG_4020 (resized).JPG

We disassembled the speaker panel, removed the plastic and all the parts. Next, we enlarged the two speaker holes to accommodate 6.5" speakers (the screw holes were correct for the left speaker but the hole is slightly too small). We then fabricated spacers to keep the coaxial speaker tweeters from pressing up against the speaker grille. Next the cut areas all had a coat of matte black paint so you won't see the exposed MDF through the front of the speaker holes. Tomorrow, we'll reassemble everything back together again and put it back in the machine, the first time it's been there since last June.

#314 2 years ago

Enlarging the speaker holes is no simple task. We used a circle cutter but continued to run into problems because of the bevel/angled nature in which the cutter cuts. Making spacers was easy, though. Today/tomorrow, we'll fully reassemble the speaker panel with new speakers. Getting ready to re-apply the plastic to the front of the panel:

IMG_4037 (resized).JPG

#315 2 years ago

Speaker panel is now complete. Getting the spacers right required a little shaving off the sides. For future reference, the spacers for a typical 6.5" speaker has to go no farther than the leftmost and rightmost edge of the speaker itself so it does not interfere with the backbox wood which the J hook holds on to. Here's the new panel from the back:

IMG_4044 (resized).JPG

The front:

IMG_4045 (resized).JPG

...and finally, in the backbox!

IMG_4046 (resized).JPG

Next up: Cleaning and replacing the cabinet wiring harness and creating/installing the new speaker wiring harness. Maybe also returning the backbox light panel... Then onto the playfield. We find the playfield intimidating, as it's our first playfield swap, but we'll take it slow.

#316 2 years ago

You guys are doing great. It'll be a nice specimen when you are done. Keep up the good work.

#317 2 years ago

Thanks! Restored light panel installed (we're wondering for later, since we plan on used LEDs, if the red bubble is required with a red LED):

IMG_4047 (resized).JPG

We were a little worried if the backbox, after all the restoration work, still would fit and the hinges work properly. Looking good:

IMG_4048 (resized).JPG

Finally, we had to see what this thing looked like with a new mirrored backglass. I won't lie, it's pretty amazing. Can't wait to light this thing up.

IMG_4049 (resized).JPG

#318 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Thanks! Restored light panel installed (we're wondering for later, since we plan on used LEDs, if the red bubble is required with a red LED):

We were a little worried if the backbox, after all the restoration work, still would fit and the hinges work properly. Looking good:

Finally, we had to see what this thing looked like with a new mirrored backglass. I won't lie, it's pretty amazing. Can't wait to light this thing up.

I would leave the red lens, even with an LED because it has facets inside that diffuse the light.

#319 2 years ago

Yesterday, we cleaned the wiring harnesses.

IMG_4050 (resized).JPG

Today, we finished wiring the cabinet and added all the new harnesses for the new speaker system. You can see the new L-pot and wired crossover here, along with the cabinet wiring harnesses.

IMG_4055 (resized).JPG

Next, we added the warning label to the light panel. Big moment!

IMG_4056 (resized).JPG

Then, finally, the Williams serial stickers and FCC labels:

IMG_4059 (resized).JPG

IMG_4060 (resized).JPG

Ok folks. We can't procrastinate any longer. There's nothing left we can do on the cabinet (besides mods later). It's time to move the playfield into teardown mode!

#321 2 years ago

I like all the little details. Really good work. Looking forward to the next stage. Big Thumbs up.

IMG_0590 (resized).JPG

#322 2 years ago

Are you planning on doing any mods? For example, this shuttle mod would be sweet.

IMG_0591 (resized).JPG

#323 2 years ago
Quoted from PinSinner:

I like all the little details. Really good work. Looking forward to the next stage. Big Thumbs up.

details make the difference.. shes gonna be sexy

#324 2 years ago

I love following your progress. I hope mine turns out half as nice as yours.

#325 2 years ago

Thank you for posting this. Amazing journey with your son and looking forward to the final result!

#326 2 years ago
Quoted from PinSinner:

Are you planning on doing any mods? For example, this shuttle mod would be sweet.

Yes, we are definitely doing some mods...Though we want to get this completely restored first. We'll probably accommodate the Pinduino (thanks lyonsden) including a path for the wiring, though other mods will have to wait until later. I'm nervous that we'll get this all together and have a lot of troubleshooting for switches or other issues, and mods could complicate that process.

#327 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Yes, we are definitely doing some mods...Though we want to get this completely restored first. We'll probably accommodate the Pinduino (thanks lyonsden) including a path for the wiring, though other mods will have to wait until later. I'm nervous that we'll get this all together and have a lot of troubleshooting for switches or other issues, and mods could complicate that process.

Wise move. You have new switches going in?

#328 2 years ago
Quoted from MustangPaul:

Wise move. You have new switches going in?

You know, I wasn't planning on it. I'm hoping I can just re-use what is there without re-soldering everything. What do you think?

This is the sort of thing I'm dealing with:

IMG_4068 (resized).JPG

#329 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

You know, I wasn't planning on it. I'm hoping I can just re-use what is there without re-soldering everything. What do you think?
This is the sort of thing I'm dealing with:

On route, usually it's drywall screws, the longer, the better. It's like some kind of lazy fix-all.

#330 2 years ago

For the record, the missing screw was for the launch rail.

#331 2 years ago

We have been busy, to say the least!

We moved the playfield and rotisserie into our pinball room. The garage was getting colder and damper and I didn't feel comfortable leaving everything out there. All of you have been incredibly helpful, with the most common advice being "take pictures of everything." I've taken hundreds of photos of the playfield, the underside, and everything I could get access to. I walked the playfield and underside slowly with a video camera.

Then it occurred to me... I had access to a GoPro Hero 3 I wasn't using at the moment, so I thought...This might make a really cool time lapse video, doing the complete teardown. I mounted the camera above our heads on a wide angle, and I've been turning it on when we work on the teardown. Here's a still from the GoPro:

GPExportPhoto (resized).jpg

I'll post the whole video once we've finished the entire teardown and playfield swap! I have it set to take photos every five seconds, so I figure if I miss something I could probably zoom in from the camera and have a good backup...Though mostly I'm doing this because I think it will look cool.

As of this moment, we've torn down the underside completely. We had to remove a few playfield components to get all the wiring harnesses out. We chose to leave the sockets and switches soldered on...We may regret that at some point, but for now, it seemed to make sense. We're finding no real consistency to screw sizes. Everything is disgustingly filthy. Here's a few photos of the current state. If you see anything that seems out of whack to you please point it out. There are certainly some missing pieces.

Underside:

IMG_4362 (resized).JPG

Topside:

IMG_4359 (resized).JPG

IMG_4360 (resized).JPG

IMG_4361 (resized).JPG

#332 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

We have been busy, to say the least!
We moved the playfield and rotisserie into our pinball room. The garage was getting colder and damper and I didn't feel comfortable leaving everything out there. All of you have been incredibly helpful, with the most common advice being "take pictures of everything." I've taken hundreds of photos of the playfield, the underside, and everything I could get access to. I walked the playfield and underside slowly with a video camera.
Then it occurred to me... I had access to a GoPro Hero 3 I wasn't using at the moment, so I thought...This might make a really cool time lapse video, doing the complete teardown. I mounted the camera above our heads on a wide angle, and I've been turning it on when we work on the teardown. Here's a still from the GoPro:

I'll post the whole video once we've finished the entire teardown and playfield swap! I have it set to take photos every five seconds, so I figure if I miss something I could probably zoom in from the camera and have a good backup...Though mostly I'm doing this because I think it will look cool.
As of this moment, we've torn down the underside completely. We had to remove a few playfield components to get all the wiring harnesses out. We chose to leave the sockets and switches soldered on...We may regret that at some point, but for now, it seemed to make sense. We're finding no real consistency to screw sizes. Everything is disgustingly filthy. Here's a few photos of the current state. If you see anything that seems out of whack to you please point it out. There are certainly some missing pieces.
Underside:

Topside:

Are you polishing out your stainless ball guides? They look like mirrors when you're done if you do, and really add to the "wow" factor. Here's a couple pics from a ToM I did where I polished out the lane guides. Really makes a difference.

ballview (resized).jpg

ramp_sideview (resized).jpg

#333 2 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

Are you polishing out your stainless ball guides? They look like mirrors when you're done if you do, and really add to the "wow" factor. Here's a couple pics from a ToM I did where I polished out the lane guides. Really makes a difference.

Ok, yes, that looks awesome. Tell me more...How do you polish the guides? Is it just incrementing sanding grit? Did you use a dremel or polisher of some kind?

I'd be happy with a "like new" stainless look, or a mirrored look. The challenge with mirrored is how fast the ball trail will show, don't you think?

#334 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Ok, yes, that looks awesome. Tell me more...How do you polish the guides? Is it just incrementing sanding grit? Did you use a dremel or polisher of some kind?
I'd be happy with a "like new" stainless look, or a mirrored look. The challenge with mirrored is how fast the ball trail will show, don't you think?

In my experience, once you mirror polish them, they actually resist ball trails much longer.

I made a buffer with this:
http://www.harborfreight.com/6-inch-bench-grinder-39797.html

Took off the protectors and grinding wheels and attached one of these on each side instead:
http://www.harborfreight.com/6-in-spiral-cotton-buffing-wheel-69700.html

(I think I had to play around with nuts and spacers to make it firmly attach to the spindle on each side - it's been a while)

Then polishing compounds:
Brown - rough polish to get ball trails out:
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-lb-brown-polish-compound-96775.html

White - smooth out the finish and make it shine:
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-lb-white-polish-compound-96780.html

Green - Super shine it:
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-lb-green-polish-compound-96778.html

You can to two of the three on all the stainless, but you'll have to change a wheel to do the green at last.

To polish posts and screws, I put them in a drill that I set to turn AGAINST the movement of the wheel and "drill" the post to a huge shine. Works fantastic.

Also, make SURE:
1. Always wear safety glasses around this
2. ALWAYS use relatively heavy leather gloves to protect you from the heat and getting cut/gouged if the metal catches the wheel.
3. Make sure your hair is nowhere near the spinning wheels. This includes if you drop something. DO NOT PICK IT UP WHILE WHEELS ARE ON.
4. If a piece you're polishing catches - LET IT GO. Don't try to hold on to it!
5. Always polish on the part of the wheel spinning AWAY from you (the bottom)

I usually start by going perpendicular to the grain to lose the ball trails, then going with the grain (that's now gone) to get the mirror finish. Sometimes I do 45 degree angles across the surface, too, if there are heavy trails.

The only piece in any game that's really tricky is the orbit guide, because it's so big and unwieldy, and if it catches, you can get smacked by a post stuck to it (safety glasses are very important, here, especially)

#335 2 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

I usually start by going against the grain to lost the ball trails, then going with the grain (that's now gone) to get the mirror finish. Sometimes I do 45 degree angles across the surface, too, if there are heavy trails.

This advice is gold. I'll give it a try once I get there. I've also got a ToM, I love that look in yours, I may have to do it myself.

#336 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

This advice is gold. I'll give it a try once I get there. I've also got a ToM, I love that look in yours, I may have to do it myself.

On re-reading that I saw there was a typo and I also wasn't clear that I meant going perpendicular to the grain when I said "going against" the grain.

That particular Theatre was my favorite restoration job, ever. I did a cool orange-ish powder coating that really looked boss on the cabinet. Playfield was cleared, too.

rt_corner (resized).jpg

rollovers (resized).jpg

overtrunk (resized).jpg

#337 2 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

On re-reading that I saw there was a typo and I also wasn't clear that I meant going perpendicular to the grain when I said "going against" the grain.
That particular Theatre was my favorite restoration job, ever. I did a cool orange-ish powder coating that really looked boss on the cabinet. Playfield was cleared, too.

As my son and I are going through this process, he asks me from time to time if we'll give the same treatment to the ToM. My ToM is in really great shape. Any further work on it is just my OCD. However, at some point, I'll want to restore the playfield to perfection, and when I do, I'll do some work on the cabinet.

Meanwhile, there is a Harbor Freight not far from here, I think I'll learn how to polish.

#338 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Meanwhile, there is a Harbor Freight not far from here, I think I'll learn how to polish.

Don't forget to take a 25% off coupon from the paper.

The main reason I did that particular ToM was it had a literally perfect cabinet. It was a warehouse find that had to have been parked right after it came out because I've never seen a non-HUO cabinet that was literally as perfect as the day it came out of the box. The insides were a different story. They had been using it for parts, so it was missing a ton of playfield stuff. The playfield itself was okay with just some scratches from careless removal of parts, so I decided to have it cleared. The whole thing took a little over a year (6 months to get the cleared PF back and another 6 months to let it cure completely, plus the re-assembly time and experimentation on powdercoating rails). I sold it before pin prices went crazy, I think maybe $5k? It'd pull about twice that now. It is still the most beautiful ToM I've seen.

#339 2 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

Don't forget to take a 25% off coupon from the paper.
The main reason I did that particular ToM was it had a literally perfect cabinet. It was a warehouse find that had to have been parked right after it came out because I've never seen a non-HUO cabinet that was literally as perfect as the day it came out of the box. The insides were a different story. They had been using it for parts, so it was missing a ton of playfield stuff. The playfield itself was okay with just some scratches from careless removal of parts, so I decided to have it cleared. The whole thing took a little over a year (6 months to get the cleared PF back and another 6 months to let it cure completely, plus the re-assembly time and experimentation on powdercoating rails). I sold it before pin prices went crazy, I think maybe $5k? It'd pull about twice that now. It is still the most beautiful ToM I've seen.

Yeah, I'm going to have to agree that it looks pretty fantastic. My only question now is what to polish to that level... My son will have some opinions!

Our ToM had an interesting history (at least to a nerd like me). It was purchased by William Hollenbeck and his brother who operated Pacific Coast Pinball. They did restorations and repairs for years, but apparently kept this ToM as their personal favorite. They took care of it like a classic car. Mike Chestnut gold plating of the rails and playfield hardware, nice work with the saw blade, fairly unique trunk chain that matched the "Joos" locks on the cabinet art. They sold it to someone in the SF pinball league who took great care of it and then sold it to me. I learned the provenance because I found a little treasure: Wedged deep inside the cabinet underneath a cross cabinet bracing was an envelope, addressed to the Hollenbecks, return address from Leon Borre, the famous Belgian pinball repair genius. Inside the envelope was a mysterious chip labeled "Atari Test." I ended up contacting William Hollenbeck and learning the history of the machine, and the chip. Leon created these custom ROMs that if you placed into a machine, would somehow help you diagnose issues for repair. It was a fairly nuanced and mysterious process and it turns out he created one for Atari pinball machines, which the Hollenbecks accidentally lost in this ToM. It's fun to know where your machine has been!

For this restoration of our BoP, we have no such history available to us. Even the guy who sold us the machine in its original crappy condition couldn't offer us much, as it had been traded for cheap amongst various pinball machine pushers for a number of years before finding us. Miraculously, despite the boot print inside the cabinet, it really was in decent shape and the electronics were spotless. The drywall screws seem to be where the ramps cracked, so at least I understand the method to the madness. I have Cliffy's for when the new ramps go in.

Anyway, my son and I finished the underside teardown and have begun removing parts from the topside.

Does anyone have any thoughts/recommendations on tumbling parts? Which parts are worth tumbling, which parts should never be put in a tumbler, how to keep from mixing up parts? We have a large and smaller tumbler so we can do a ton at once, but the challenge with that is the fear of losing track of what goes to what. (Obviously we'll take photos but I'm just being cautious.) Our intent is to clean all the assemblies and coils, put in new coil sleeves, re-paper them and do clean solder work for each coil. We may molex the assemblies, but honestly, I'm not sure it's worth it since I have no intention on removing anything with any frequency.

#340 2 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

Also, make SURE:
1. Always wear safety glasses around this
2. ALWAYS use relatively heavy leather gloves to protect you from the heat and getting cut/gouged if the metal catches the wheel.
3. Make sure your hair is nowhere near the spinning wheels. This includes if you drop something. DO NOT PICK IT UP WHILE WHEELS ARE ON.
4. If a piece you're polishing catches - LET IT GO. Don't try to hold on to it!
5. Always polish on the part of the wheel spinning AWAY from you (the bottom)

GREAT advice, particularly No-2. I polished up all guides on a JD project recently and Whoooaaaa boy does that metal get HOT and also YUP those suckers fly when it catches on a screw down tab

#341 2 years ago

Preview of our progress:

teardown_spin_3.gif

#342 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Preview of our progress:

What the heck is that??? You better take a look, something is wrong with that vid..

#343 2 years ago
Quoted from MustangPaul:

What the heck is that??? You better take a look, something is wrong with that vid..

You're right, it's missing the music soundtrack.

#344 2 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

You're right, it's missing the music soundtrack.

#345 2 years ago

Looks like you're a dj in a club using a playfield to scratch with.

1 week later
#346 2 years ago

Getting ready for the re-assembly. The original playfield has been fully stripped:

IMG_4766 (resized).JPG

New playfield up in the rotisserie. We put rubber pads on the clamps to protect the clear coat:

IMG_4767 (resized).JPG

We've pre-drilled out the clear from any of the smaller holes, and also the tops of the starter holes. Have you guys bothered to drill those starter holes any deeper or wider prior to adding wood screw type of posts? Also, if a screw hole had a counter-sink depression on the original playfield, I assume we should create the same on the new one. This has been a perfect opportunity for the hand drill. I love this thing.

IMG_4768 (resized).JPG

Also tumbled and organized all the loose post-related hardware. I still have to take apart each of the assemblies and tumble them. I'll begin photographing and doing that next as the initial work begins.

IMG_4771 (resized).JPG

#347 2 years ago

Make sure you drill out the clear for the top side T nuts and the nails for the pop bumpers.

#348 2 years ago
Quoted from MustangPaul:

Make sure you drill out the clear for the top side T nuts and the nails for the pop bumpers.

The t nuts seem to have counter sink depressions already, are you suggesting that I drill that out? Also, the original playfield had pop bumper nails that resembled large wood screws (with reverse threads). The new ones are fin-shank nails with a thinner head. Should those heads be perfectly flush with the playfield? I assume so... Though with the fin-shank nails it might make sense to pre-drill the clear and provide a SMALL counter-sink hole by comparison to the original screws. Thoughts?

#349 2 years ago

Yes drill only the clear out from those T nut and nail depressions, just the clear NOT any wood.

#350 2 years ago

Great use for a Forstner drill bit. When you have the tools...

IMG_4772 (resized).JPG

Disassembled the ramps, ramp switches, and a few assemblies to send to the tumbler. We've set aside all the brushed aluminum rail guides (and Cliffy kits) for polishing... While we're at it, let's restore those rubber rollers!

IMG_4897 (resized).JPG

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