(Topic ID: 163782)

BoP: Father and Son's First Restoration [COMPLETE]


By jsa

3 years ago



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There are 450 posts in this topic. You are on page 4 of 9.
#151 3 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

When in doubt; always powdercoat hardware.
Seriously; powdercoating is the bomb!

Yeah that's it, powdercoat the cab and bb.

#152 3 years ago
Quoted from MustangPaul:

Yeah that's it, powdercoat the cab and bb.

It is possible you know. Not recommended but possible.
I was referring to the screw heads he was working on a couple of posts back.

#153 3 years ago
Quoted from MustangPaul:

When you sanded the last coat of black paint how long did you let it dry after sanding before you sprayed the clear?

I didn't spray on clear in this case, it was another layer of black paint, three days later. Unfortunately, not long enough for curing.

Quoted from vireland:

That temp should be fine. You have to get into the 60's before you could have issues.
Other causes could be two incompatible types of paint/primer or the timing of the second coat.

Alas, you have all deduced correctly, I rushed it. I'm learning a new level of patience watching paint dry.

Quoted from Classic_Stern:

That is doing too much to fast. The layers need time to cure and if too thick same thing.

Yes, I agree, I will force myself to take more time. Interestingly, the raised areas sank back down after about an hour. More evidence that patience is a virtue.

#154 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Alas, you have all deduced correctly, I rushed it. I'm learning a new level of patience watching paint dry.

It wasn't anything major, at least. I really like what you're doing and am a little jelly.

Two questions:
1. Are you going to make this a Bride 2.0 machine? That new DP software is amazing.
2. Putting in a new repro playfield? Most of the BoP's I've seen are fully mylared and pretty ugly compared to the new repros:
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/bop-bride-of-pinbot-repro-playfield-list-closing/page/8#post-3034943

#155 3 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

It wasn't anything major, at least. I really like what you're doing and am a little jelly.
Two questions:
1. Are you going to make this a Bride 2.0 machine? That new DP software is amazing.

Honestly, my son and I haven't decided. We both really enjoy playing BoP 2.0, so it may be in the future. Before we would do that, we would want to fully restore the original as best we can.

Quoted from vireland:

2. Putting in a new repro playfield? Most of the BoP's I've seen are fully mylared and pretty ugly compared to the new repros:
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/bop-bride-of-pinbot-repro-playfield-list-closing/page/8#post-3034943

We are going to be using a repro playfield. Our playfield is actually in decent shape, and if we had some more experience, would probably be worth restoring. It is fully mylared, though that could also be a good thing as once removed it might be somewhat protected. However, as you might see from this thread, painting is our biggest weakness, so we'll stick with the repro playfield.

Doing a playfield swap is also new for us, so we're researching good ways to document our teardown.

#156 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

We are going to be using a repro playfield. Our playfield is actually in decent shape, and if we had some more experience, would probably be worth restoring. It is fully mylared, though that could also be a good thing as once removed it might be somewhat protected. However, as you might see from this thread, painting is our biggest weakness, so we'll stick with the repro playfield.
Doing a playfield swap is also new for us, so we're researching good ways to document our teardown.

Just take a LOT of pictures, from every angle, with each step of taking everything off, top and bottom. You'll never be sorry you took too many pictures, or not taking pictures from enough angles. When you're done, send them to me and I'll add them to www.theteardown.com for everyone to reference in the future!

When I do a teardown, I usually have either 4 or 6 large ziplock bags and label them in quadrants to keep the pieces in the approximate areas they came from. Big stuff like ramps I obviously don't put in the bags, but where they go is self-explanatory.

#157 3 years ago
Quoted from vireland:

Just take a LOT of pictures, from every angle, with each step of taking everything off, top and bottom. You'll never be sorry you took too many pictures, or not taking pictures from enough angles. When you're done, send them to me and I'll add them to http://www.theteardown.com for everyone to reference in the future!
When I do a teardown, I usually have either 4 or 6 large ziplock bags and label them in quadrants to keep the pieces in the approximate areas they came from. Big stuff like ramps I obviously don't put in the bags, but where they go is self-explanatory.

You got it, I'll be sure to organize the photos as best I can for your reference site. So far, the only playfield elements that have been photographed/removed is the apron, rear wood panel (whatever you call that), and the two wireform rails, as I intend on having them plated. I took photos from various angles as I removed them.

What I remembered most from the cabinet was that I really needed a photo of a removed screw in context. As I unscrewed something, I would lay the screw sideways near the hole and take a photo, so I could get a sense of what size screw went there. This being said, I really think I'll throw a spreadsheet together saying how many of which type of screw is associated with each removed part, and put the part and its associated screws in a bag labeled with a sharpie. Maybe I'll take a photo of the parts all on a table together for each bag as well.

Then, for screws/washers/nuts etc., I'll total up the count when it's all torn down and buy new ones (cheaper than Flitz). I'll tumble the rest of the stuff, or in the case of guides, polish them up.

That's the current plan. I got a bunch of ideas from this thread I started last year:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/teardown-techniques

If there is something I could add to make your reference site easier let me know.

#158 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Also, can someone explain to me the science/wisdom around this:

or from another angle:

It seems that after sanding a coat of paint (say, at 320 grit), the entire surface will appear 100% uniform. Then, when I paint a new coat, there will be some areas that look like that. Almost like a naturally occuring steel diamond plate pattern. Is this random? Something left behind in the previous coat? We're at a loss.

What you have here is exactly what I described earlier and still routinely happens to me.

Quoted from lb1:

I have used the Rustoleum spray cans quite extensively for my TZ cab and other stuff. I like them a lot except that I find the solvent so hot that unless you wait long enough between two coats, you end up dissolving the previous coat. It's happened to me multiple times, as recently as Sunday, painting wood rails.

The problem with the spray cans is that the solvent is very hot. Unless you spray light coats, you risk melting the previous coat - unless you wait several days for the paint to cure, with makes for a very time consuming restoration. And it's hard to get a wet uniform coat without spraying quite a bit. Going forward, I'm thinking of either spraying can paint a bit diluted with a HVLP gun or spraying a light first coat just to get the color and using clear to get the finish - base coat / top coat. That's what I did in https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/lotr-refresh/page/2#post-3302312 after having had exactly the same problem you show in your pic.

#159 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

You can see some inconsistency with the semi-gloss clear. I'm pretty sure this happened because the pressure out of the can was so high, even at 12", it pushed or blew the previous line of paint aside.

Do you guys recommend we add a coat or two, or sand down (maybe wet sand with high grit) and then a new coat?

For this one, I would do a light sanding, and add two wet coats of clear applied with a foam brush or a spray can, but with the head horizontal. This way you can get a nice wet coat with no run.

#160 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

Doing a playfield swap is also new for us, so we're researching good ways to document our teardown.

Some good advice in your other thread. I typically do is what Bryan suggested and many probably do - take detailed pictures or the tear down process in the exact order of the tear down. For areas where there can be some ambiguity on say, the size of a spacer or a screw, I take extra pics showing a close up of the part.

In addition, I often go to HEP Gallery for some high-quality larger pics.

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#161 3 years ago
Quoted from lb1:

For this one, I would do a light sanding, and add two wet coats of clear applied with a foam brush or a spray can, but with the head horizontal. This way you can get a nice wet coat with no run.

My concern here with a rattle can is that we'll end up with the same effect (inconsistent gloss) due to the burning or blowing away the clear as the can makes each traversal across the face. That leads you to using a roller, but with a roller, does it dry flat or is the nap of the roller an issue? I suppose I could do a light sanding (what grit, by the way, do you recommend for this, and any reason to wet sand vs. dry at this stage) and then wait for a few days before spraying, and worse case, sand it again.

#162 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

My concern here with a rattle can is that we'll end up with the same effect (inconsistent gloss) due to the burning or blowing away the clear as the can makes each traversal across the face. That leads you to using a roller, but with a roller, does it dry flat or is the nap of the roller an issue? I suppose I could do a light sanding (what grit, by the way, do you recommend for this, and any reason to wet sand vs. dry at this stage) and then wait for a few days before spraying, and worse case, sand it again.

With the rails in https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/lotr-refresh/page/2#post-3302312, I had the exact same inconsistent gloss problem when spraying gloss black paint. This was resolved with the clear applied with a foam brush. The texture of the foam is not an issue because the clear is very fluid. I think the MixWax fast drying clear is more fluid because it contains more solvent. I like foam brush better than roller. Sometimes with the roller I get tiny bubbles.

Wet sand lightly with 400 or 600 grit.

Unless you get a wet coat with the spray, you can get inconsistent gloss.

If you look at https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/lotr-refresh#post-3182125 you can see the melted paint from the hot solvent.
I ended up spraying semi-gloss paint as a mist from 2 feet away to get a egg-shell pearl like texture that has an homogeneous gloss and hides surface defects a bit more. Result in https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/lotr-refresh#post-3187382. I did the exact same for my TZ cabinet (see https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/another-tz-restoration-thread#post-2131726).

#163 3 years ago
Quoted from lb1:

I think the MixWax fast drying clear is more fluid because it contains more solvent.

Thanks for the advice, I'll give it a shot. Any problem using a polyurethane clear on top of a latex paint?

#164 3 years ago

I seem to recall Vid saying that oil-based polyurethane will yellow over time...

#165 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

I seem to recall Vid saying that oil-based polyurethane will yellow over time...

Yes, hence, not a good choice for a playfield. Could yellow a bit your cabinet. It wasn't a problem for my black rails. Water base will dull a bit the color. Do you really need to clear your cabinet? A good semi-gloss paint should hold on well. I did https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/another-tz-restoration-thread#post-2265972 with three coats of black semi-gloss enamel and a roller. No clear. The finish is nice enough.

#166 3 years ago

I agree, no need for clear, the issue was that my HVLP sprayed on latex had inconsistent semi-gloss on the back of the backbox. The purpose of the semi-gloss clear was to even it out. Ironically, it just made it less even, furthering the wisdom that what is on bottom is amplified by coats above it.

Pretty soon we'll be finished with the painting... I can't wait. I'm done with this respirator! We need to psych ourselves up for wet application of decals next.

#167 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

I agree, no need for clear, the issue was that my HVLP sprayed on latex had inconsistent semi-gloss on the back of the backbox. The purpose of the semi-gloss clear was to even it out. Ironically, it just made it less even, furthering the wisdom that what is on bottom is amplified by coats above it.
Pretty soon we'll be finished with the painting... I can't wait. I'm done with this respirator! We need to psych ourselves up for wet application of decals next.

Folks aren't joking when they say they spend 60+ hours on the cab alone.

The wet decal isn't difficult at all.

Use some Windex and a rubber brayer, not a squeegee. You can press as hard as you need with a brayer. You can't with a squeegee.

Put some paper towels all around to avoid Windex leaking onto the rest of the cabinet.

Start with the head.

The transformer is great to hold the decal in place. Make sure you put plenty of protection though.

Cut right away and close to the edge (1/32")

Use a wood panel to fill in the door area. I have one you can borrow though it isn't hard to make from an old piece of plywood.

#168 3 years ago
Quoted from lb1:

This was resolved with the clear applied with a foam brush. The

Did you do one side at the time laying the cabinet face up or did you do all sides with the cab standing normal? Would the clear run down? would the brush mark show up for large surface?

I'm tempted to try it with Varathane interior Diamond Finish, it ends up way more cheaper in pint than in spray cans.

#169 3 years ago
Quoted from lb1:

Folks aren't joking when they say they spend 60+ hours on the cab alone.

No, not a joke. I don't understand how professionally restoring pinball machines can be profitable or how much it must cost to get it professionally redone... Does not even include the cost of all the new parts...

#170 3 years ago
Quoted from Plumonium:

Did you do one side at the time laying the cabinet face up or did you do all sides with the cab standing normal? Would the clear run down? would the brush mark show up for large surface?
I'm tempted to try it with Varathane interior Diamond Finish, it ends up way more cheaper in pint than in spray cans.

These were rails. The clear did not run down but this was a small surface. I probably would do the cabinet standing normal because this clear is thin and you can easily correct the runs. Runs when spraying are a killer but not so much when using a brush and some thin clear.

#171 3 years ago
Quoted from Plumonium:

No, not a joke. I don't understand how professionally restoring pinball machines can be profitable or how much it must cost to get it professionally redone... Does not even include the cost of all the new parts...

I could not agree more. The talent it takes to do top end restorations relative to the money that's in it makes me respect the top pros all the more.

1 week later
#172 3 years ago

After traveling for a week, we're almost finished painting. I'll post some final photos of the paint work soon. Meanwhile, does anyone here have a good photo of the ground braid behind the pcb panel in the backbox? I failed to take a good photo.

#173 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

After traveling for a week, we're almost finished painting. I'll post some final photos of the paint work soon. Meanwhile, does anyone here have a good photo of the ground braid behind the pcb panel in the backbox? I failed to take a good photo.

Sorry, I don't have a good pic, but I look forward to the paint job!

here's a shameless link to my current project, I used Krylon rattle cans, I think it turned out ok, but i wasn't going for restoration perfection

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/gamatron-scratch-build/page/3#post-3334379

#174 3 years ago
Quoted from Chosen_S:

Sorry, I don't have a good pic, but I look forward to the paint job!
here's a shameless link to my current project, I used Krylon rattle cans, I think it turned out ok, but i wasn't going for restoration perfection
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/gamatron-scratch-build/page/3#post-3334379

I think it looks fantastic, though I grant you my son does most of the detailed observation. My eyes aren't what they used to be!

#175 3 years ago
Quoted from Chosen_S:

Sorry, I don't have a good pic, but I look forward to the paint job!
here's a shameless link to my current project, I used Krylon rattle cans, I think it turned out ok, but i wasn't going for restoration perfection
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/gamatron-scratch-build/page/3#post-3334379

Sweet lord that Gamatron is going to be ridiculously sweet. I want video when it's done.

#176 3 years ago
Quoted from Chosen_S:

Sorry, I don't have a good pic, but I look forward to the paint job!
here's a shameless link to my current project, I used Krylon rattle cans, I think it turned out ok, but i wasn't going for restoration perfection
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/gamatron-scratch-build/page/3#post-3334379

Just peeked at your work, great job buddy! Don't sell yourself short!

#177 3 years ago
Quoted from Plumonium:

Just peeked at your work, great job buddy! Don't sell yourself short!

Thanks guys!

Still want to see that paint job, lol

#178 3 years ago
Quoted from Chosen_S:

Thanks guys!
Still want to see that paint job, lol

Ok, it's coming! I need to move the cabinet out of its redneck spray booth and into the harsh light of day and take some photos. When I get back from work tomorrow (if there is still daylight) I'll roll it out. Seeing as tomorrow is my birthday, I might leave work early, we'll see.

#179 3 years ago

The paint job is finally complete. We now present to you our very first pinball cabinet paint job! We're clearly not perfectionists. Regardless, we learned a ton during this process that will come in handy in the future. Here are the photos, hope you don't mind all the angles:

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I believe next stop is the warning label screen printing. Does anyone have any recommendations on thinning the ink, how much and with what? Then we will move on to the dreaded decal application. My son wants to do it wet, because he believes we should have a second chance if we screw anything up.

#180 3 years ago
Quoted from jsa:

My son wants to do it wet, because he believes we should have a second chance if we screw anything up.

I've always done it wet with good results. It's more forgiving.

#181 3 years ago

Took a break from the cabinet today to work on the PCB panel. I took a note from Bryan Kelly (who in turn credited Chris at HEP) and tried to make my panel a bit nicer to look at. Here's what I started with:

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Here's my son giving it a once over with 120 grit:

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He recently cleaned a steel machete which had oxidized with lemon juice. While I realize the nature of this corrosion was a bit different, we decided to try the experiment anyway. First, apply lemon juice to paper towel:

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Next spread the lemon juice over the panel:

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After a minute or so, the lemon juice creates this film over the panel. At first I thought maybe it was just oxidizing it worse.

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Then, after a few minutes, I cleaned it with naptha and sanded again with 120. You can see it seemed to be a bit shinier than before:

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I have no idea the science behind this. Here is the final result, after 220, 320 and a red Scotch Brite pad:

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I then sprayed it with some semi gloss clear and called it a day. It's not perfect and as shiny as Bryan's but considering it's a piece of metal you can't see I'm pretty satisfied.

#182 3 years ago

We restored the light panel and did our silk screens. Unfortunately, we made a rookie mistake on the screens.

First, the light panel. The plastic light shield that fastens to the front of the light panel is super brittle. It looks like, over time, heat from the incandescent lamps caused some of the very thin outer plastic to shrink, causing them to crack or bend inward. I made an executive decision we shouldn't bother trying to restore the outer edge of this component, it was way too brittle. Instead, I just sprayed it with Rustoleum 2X Painters Touch Semi-Gloss White.

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The light panel itself required I remove the bulb sockets from the back. I then sanded the back with 120 and 220, cleaning it up quite nicely. For the front, I did a very light sanding with 320 and then sprayed also with Rustoleum 2X Painters Touch Semi-Gloss White. I think it looks quite nice.

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Removing the bulb sockets from the back did result in a few chips and pieces of old, brittle plastic coming off some of the sockets. None of the integrity of the sockets themselves were damaged so it's not that big a deal, but has anyone ever sourced new sockets anywhere? I've never seen these for sale. Also, those wires love to pop out of the IDC connectors. What's the best tool for punching them down? I was hoping my 110/66 punch tool would work but it's not perfect for these. The IDC punch tool I use for the wires in the backbox also doesn't fit right for these sockets. I'm just curious what you all use.

The amateur mistake with the silk screen was we put in too much thinner. Basically, I thinned it until it looked about the viscosity I saw in the video in which Bryan Kelly shows us how to do the screens. Here was the final result:

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The letters came out satisfactory, maybe a bit soft on the edges:

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Honestly, that doesn't bother me at all. It's the CAUTION area that really came out blotchy that really bothers me:

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The patent text on the back of the cabinet also was blotchy, you can see from this photo:

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Now the question: Should I try to fix this stuff? There is something almost realistic and legit about it not being perfect. Thoughts? How would I even begin to tackle fixing it even if I wanted to?

#183 3 years ago

Perfection can be the enemy of good. Looks good enough to me, particularly for your first resto.

If I think the sockets are what they are, you can find them at https://www.marcospecialties.com/control/keywordsearch?SEARCH_STRING=24-8818. That's what I used for TZ. No need for a tool. Use a flat screw driver to gently push the wire back in. Verify the connection through the whole circuit afterward with a DMM.

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/backbox-plastic-idc-lamp-sockets-extraction

#184 3 years ago

I agree. I'd leave it go. If it was the lower small one screen and was just laid down I'd consider wiping it clean and redoing, but if that's your first try, it's better than mine! It's pretty minor for the effort to redo it. It just depends on how particular you are.

#185 3 years ago

Personally, I tend to OCD over the playfield. That's what you see and experience when you play.

#186 3 years ago

I like all this advice. Besides, it looks already better than when it was new by any comparison, and no one ever sees the back of the machine anyway.

Next step for us is the decals. My son is most anxious about this step, because he's afraid (even with wet application) of ruining all the previous work. Personally I think it will go well.

Do you think it's really critical to have wood to fill the coin door area during the application? What purpose does that serve, just provide support for the decal in that space?

#187 3 years ago

You are better off with the wood. It takes 15 minutes to build using plywood scrap. It helps support the decal particularly when you press on it to get the application fluid (i.e. Windex) out. And you want to press pretty hard if you use the brayer. This is the front decal, the one you see the most. No point cutting corners there.

#188 3 years ago
Quoted from lb1:

You are better off with the wood. It takes 15 minutes to build using plywood scrap. It helps support the decal particularly when you press on it to get the application fluid (i.e. Windex) out. And you want to press pretty hard if you use the brayer. This is the front decal, the one you see the most. No point cutting corners there.

Based on that, it sounds like I would want to temporarily screw the wood into place with a support block of some kind, correct? I've seen photos of this, it looks like it would work well to avoid anything protruding outward.

#189 3 years ago

You can sort of see what I did in https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/another-tz-restoration-thread#post-2110881.

You're welcome to borrow mine though it's probably not worth the round trip to Berkeley.

The fit does not have to be exact but the panel has to be flush. You can easily adjust the depth with washers The wood panel is screwed into a support bar. The support bar is behind and is screwed into some of the existing #6 holes on each side of the opening. Two on each side is enough as you won't push like crazy. To locate the place where you need to drill, screw in some old #6 machine screws and put a small drop of paint on top, then, put the support bar. This will mark the spots. The fit won't be exact but that's fine as you can drill fairly large holes and use some washers. If you have a piece of http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-1-1-2-in-x-14-Gauge-x-72-in-Zinc-Plated-Slotted-Angle-800517/204225758 lying around it's even better as you'll likely find a position with holes facing each others.

#190 3 years ago

Why did you spray clear on the ground plate? You need it to make good contact with the ground braid for a solid ground connection. At this point I'd sand down around the holes where the ground screw clips go. Double check resistance/continuity with a multimeter.

As for the light panel, Terry at Pinball Life is 3D printing new ones of these for CFTBL, perhaps if you contact him and send him yours he'll be able to make a reproduction of it?

#191 3 years ago
Quoted from dudah:

Why did you spray clear on the ground plate? You need it to make good contact with the ground braid for a solid ground connection. At this point I'd sand down around the holes where the ground screw clips go. Double check resistance/continuity with a multimeter.
As for the light panel, Terry at Pinball Life is 3D printing new ones of these for CFTBL, perhaps if you contact him and send him yours he'll be able to make a reproduction of it?

I thought the same when I saw it but the braid goes behind and it hopefully wasn't cleared.

#192 3 years ago
Quoted from dudah:

Why did you spray clear on the ground plate? You need it to make good contact with the ground braid for a solid ground connection. At this point I'd sand down around the holes where the ground screw clips go. Double check resistance/continuity with a multimeter.
As for the light panel, Terry at Pinball Life is 3D printing new ones of these for CFTBL, perhaps if you contact him and send him yours he'll be able to make a reproduction of it?

I didn't spray the back where the ground braid makes connections. Also the boards make contact with clips that touch the rear of the pcb panel so they would have a good connection there. I may go a little overboard and sand a bit on the back on the panel where those clips come in to be 100% sure everything is grounding right.

My light panel baffle looks pretty good and should work fine, despite having some dimples. I'm not sure it's worth the effort having one reproduced. If it was broken, different story. (I could also 3D scan the baffle myself and print a replacement, though honestly I'm not sure I see the point, unless it cracks completely.)

#193 3 years ago

Someone needs to make a reproduction light shield and while they're at it... Skill shot rollers !

#194 3 years ago
Quoted from mollyspub:

Someone needs to make a reproduction light shield and while they're at it... Skill shot rollers !

I may 3D scan mine if I can get the right tools together. I'll suggest it to my son who is the 3D genius in the house. If I do and we're successful I'll post the STL file. Meanwhile, after the decals go on, we'll test our 3D printed leg bracket adapters.

#195 3 years ago

Washing the light panel wire harness.

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#196 3 years ago

You could always put it in the dishwasher.

#197 3 years ago
Quoted from MustangPaul:

You could always put it in the dishwasher.

You know, I probably could. I'm a little worried about the plastic parts melting. An ultrasonic cleaner would be ideal, but unless I'm using it a ton, I'm not sure I can justify the expense.

Regardless, this took about 10 minutes of work. As I tooth brushed each socket, I found a few that were partially cracked. I'll replace those with new ones.

#198 3 years ago

I used this for decal application and thought it was better than windex. It seemed more forgiving. Wet both the cabinet and the decal. Then press out the liquid. My TAF came out great. I also did it with the cabinets in the upright position. Try to get as much dust off your cabinet as you can just before application. My 2 cents.
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#199 3 years ago
Quoted from DiggerPSU:

I used this for decal application and thought it was better than windex. It seemed more forgiving. Wet both the cabinet and the decal. Then press out the liquid. My TAF came out great. I also did it with the cabinets in the upright position. Try to get as much dust off your cabinet as you can just before application. My 2 cents.
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I have some RapidTac which I believe is the same thing. We'll definitely do a wet application (Bryan and Jim make doing a dry application seem so simple it's tempting, but for my first time, I'd like the flexibility of a do-over)... Questions for those of you familiar with this:

I've heard using a brayer is great, or a felt squeegee. Does anyone have any opinions on this? Maybe the squeegee to get the water out and the brayer to lock it down? I have both available.

How does everyone trim their edges? My corners are beveled, but not perfectly and not 100% consistently. I get the sense that trimming the edges on the decal about 1/4" from the graphic edge prior to applying the decal would be a good first step to remove the unnecessary weight, then using a blade on a 45 degree angle to trim.

Do you all wait for it to dry to do the final trim?

What type of blade do you all use?

Finally, how long do you wait before flipping over and doing the other side? We'll start with the coin door side first.

#200 3 years ago

Brayer, FOR SURE. It acts just the same as the squeegee to get the liquid out. Start from the center and press outward.

Leave at least 1 inch all around. 1/4" seems like very little to play with.

Trimming is easy. Have a long straight edge Don't wait until it's dry. Use a fresh Xacto blade. Trim as close as you can from the edge. Like 1/16". Enough to avoid having the finger catch the decal edge but as little as you can get away with. I never did the 45 deg thing as my edges were not beveled.

Flip the next day. Use soft towels to protect the underside.

Start with the head, not the front. The head is easy. Once you are done with the head do the front then the sides since you have to do the alignment right for the start button and then the rays on the sides.

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