(Topic ID: 263142)

Biting off more than I can chew?

By undrdog

1 year ago


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  • 23 posts
  • 15 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by bingopodcast
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    #1 1 year ago

    I prefer early solid state games and EMs to the new machines. My first game is Mystic. I have room for another pin and I’ve got the bug.

    TPF is coming up and I hope to find a playable game in my budget.

    Basically, I can follow directions but don’t know what I’m doing.

    I’m comfortable soldering lamp sockets and switches, but I wouldn’t know how to trace down a problem on a schematic. Don’t know squat about circuit boards, resistors and such.

    Would getting an EM be biting off more than I can chew?

    #2 1 year ago

    Spiders and snakes, do what you want to do.

    #3 1 year ago

    EM's are somewhat different to diagnose and repair.

    #4 1 year ago

    Just buy one that works.

    #5 1 year ago

    Do it! Might I suggest a 1 player that is already working for you to buy. If something breaks between the show and your home it won’t be several issues; just one thing (hopefully)

    #6 1 year ago
    Quoted from undrdog:

    I prefer early solid state games and EMs to the new machines. My first game is Mystic. I have room for another pin and I’ve got the bug.
    TPF is coming up and I hope to find a playable game in my budget.
    Basically, I can follow directions but don’t know what I’m doing.
    I’m comfortable soldering lamp sockets and switches, but I wouldn’t know how to trace down a problem on a schematic. Don’t know squat about circuit boards, resistors and such.
    Would getting an EM be biting off more than I can chew?

    Pm sent

    #7 1 year ago

    Depends what you enjoy...I like the repair and restore aspect as much as playing. Nothing that can’t be learned if you are motivated!

    #8 1 year ago

    We have several local EM gurus. If you can't figure it out.....I'm sure one of the Kens can!

    And I can generally help with solid state stuff, if you need some guidance on a specific issue.

    #9 1 year ago

    If you want to learn to fix them, then buy the most messed up one you can find. Not that much to learn compared to SS

    #10 1 year ago
    Quoted from jrpinball:

    Just buy one that works.

    your new avatar photo looks like its gained some weight.

    #11 1 year ago

    EMs are not that difficult once you figure out how they work.
    Dig in and be patient. Also like early SS pins but I've found
    that after they have been gone through properly EMs are
    more reliable.

    If you're up for a real challenge, get a bingo. Intimidating at
    first and game play is on the boring side but get one working
    properly and you've done something you can be proud of.
    Steve

    #12 1 year ago
    Quoted from pinwiztom:

    your new avatar photo looks like its gained some weight.

    That was Wayne when he attended the opening of the National Pinball Museum in DC.
    He was probably a young man in his 80s at that time.

    #13 1 year ago

    For your first EM buy a 100% working one from an experienced collector. Then when something goes wrong, it will only be one thing to fix at a time. You can learn anything with patience and perseverance (and a little help from pinside).

    #14 1 year ago

    I’d say get one. Yes, they can be a bit cantankerous once in a while. But they are a joy. Make sure you get a schematic with it. And if you go for a working machine, get into it anyway. Learn how to adjust things. Learn how score reels work. Learn how relays work. Learn how the score motor works. Ask for advice on Pinside, because the EM community is the friendliest community here. They will not only help you learn, but they will teach you how to do things. They will explain sections of schematics and show you how to find your problem (hoping you learn so next time you solve it yourself). And after some time the schematic will make sense. It may take months, or it might take years, but eventually you can learn EMs. And the reward is awesome fun games.

    #15 1 year ago

    Thanks everyone. All the gadgetry was pretty intimidating to me. Now I feel much more confident.

    Two years ago friends offered me their Royal Flush, and I didn’t jump on it. Now they've decided to keep it. It’s been in their house unused for ten years, at least. They got it free from my brother, who played it until something quit working.

    #16 1 year ago

    Frax PM sent.

    #17 1 year ago
    Quoted from jrpinball:

    That was Wayne when he attended the opening of the National Pinball Museum in DC.
    He was probably a young man in his 80s at that time.

    I was going to say he looked healthier and more robust.

    #18 1 year ago
    Quoted from zarco:

    If you're up for a real challenge, get a bingo. Intimidating at
    first and game play is on the boring side but get one working
    properly and you've done something you can be proud of.

    How hard would it be to find parts? Especially coin payoff parts. Would I have to figure out how to manufacture major components?

    #19 1 year ago

    I’ll have two EM single-player games for sale, nicely shopped, but might be higher than your price range. Either way, stop by and enjoy Top Card and Spin Out!

    Quoted from undrdog:

    I prefer early solid state games and EMs to the new machines. My first game is Mystic. I have room for another pin and I’ve got the bug.
    TPF is coming up and I hope to find a playable game in my budget.
    Basically, I can follow directions but don’t know what I’m doing.
    I’m comfortable soldering lamp sockets and switches, but I wouldn’t know how to trace down a problem on a schematic. Don’t know squat about circuit boards, resistors and such.
    Would getting an EM be biting off more than I can chew?

    #20 1 year ago
    Quoted from goldenboy232:

    Either way, stop by and enjoy Top Card and Spin Out!

    I will!

    #21 1 year ago
    Quoted from undrdog:

    How hard would it be to find parts?

    Pretty easy. Majority of parts were also used by their flipper games. Very robust and generally not destroyed. Generally being the key word.

    Quoted from undrdog:

    Especially coin payoff parts.

    No bingos came from the factory (except one) of the 139 games produced with a coin payoff option. Even for that one it was totally optional.

    Quoted from undrdog:

    Would I have to figure out how to manufacture major components?

    Nope! Again, very robust.

    They are a joy to work on and a thinking person's game. The action is all the drama in build up of features and the agony of missing a number that you need. Another ball is right around the corner to definitely 100% make it into the hole you need
    ... this time. There are tons of features that allow you to physically move the numbers on the card, change the layout, or return some or all of the balls to be replayed. Endless depth, endless challenge.

    Working on EMs is quite fun and pretty easy. It's a matter of logical thinking and testing assumptions based on reading of the schematic (and manual if it's a bingo or very late flipper game).

    Above all types of games I work on, I vastly prefer EMs. I help people all over the world work on their games (as do many that have posted in this thread). EM schematics are great!

    Games from the 30s and 40s are challenging if you don't have EM repair experience (since there are usually no schematics), but after you've worked on a couple of games and understand the general routines for startup and gameplay, you'll be able to troubleshoot them as well.

    Good luck!

    #22 1 year ago

    There's two NIB old stock bingos on eBay. Look to be from a flooded warehouse. Out of my budget, just kind of amazed there’d be pinballs from the 70s still in boxes.

    #23 1 year ago

    DennisDodel brought a Silver Sails from 1962 to be unboxed at the York Show two years ago. Simply amazing.

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