Best Way To Clean Old #44 Sockets?

(Topic ID: 238306)

Best Way To Clean Old #44 Sockets?


By CUJO

11 days ago



Topic Stats

  • 28 posts
  • 13 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 days ago by CUJO
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

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    #1 11 days ago

    Thought I might try this on my Caveman and Alien Poker first.
    How well do these really work?

    https://www.marcospecialties.com/pinball-parts/77-SCS

    Thanks!

    #2 11 days ago

    From my experience any socket bad enough to need that treatment also needs the barrel soldered to the mounting tab and/or the wire moved from the solder tab to the base/nipple. In which case I’d say your time & money are better spent just replacing sockets. I’ve tried those band aids on old Bally games, and the whack-a-moke of flaky sockets never ends.

    #3 11 days ago

    Use a Dremel tool and a 443-2 bit. Dip it in a bit of rubbing alcohol and run it in the socket for a couple of seconds. Works almost every time.

    #4 11 days ago

    Ronnie - I saw this in another thread, but haven't tried it yet. Any advice on speed? I'm assuming just get it in there and hit the edges/bottom as best you can and give it a try? I'll be the first to admit flakey light sockets have been one of the last things I've worried about in my collection and I'm just getting to the point to start reviewing these. (I'd rather get them up and flipping first, then worry about lights... and usually I have a new project in before I get to the lights... 17 machines later... haha)

    #5 10 days ago

    I keep a cleaning stick in my toolbag since I don't normally bring a dremel tool with me when I'm on the go. It's handy to clean out a socket in a pinch, or if the socket is in a place that's hard to reach. It's not something I really use very often, though.

    Like yancy said, if the socket is bad enough, it sometimes just needs to be replaced.

    #6 10 days ago

    I would say with your tongue. Be sure that the pin is turned on so you have plenty of light to see what you are doing.

    On a serious note, I've just used some twisted steel wool (similar to how you would form a tissue to stuff into your nostril to stop a nosebleed). Make sure the pin is turned off, insert the steel wool fully, then give it several twists to rub off any rust or other gunk from the contacts.

    #7 10 days ago

    About as well as a pencil eraser.

    Best fix for old sockets is replace with new, especially if the cardboard (or whatever it is) in the bottom has shrunk over time.

    Some people try to be cheapies and "fix" old sockets - not worth it in the long haul. Lots of work and you will still have some flaky sockets.

    #8 10 days ago

    If you are just wanting to clean the inside to make good connections the cleaning sticks work pretty well, they are like round sandpaper with just the right amount of grit. Doing more than one or two by hand will get to you though. I chuck mine into my cordless variable speed drill and hit every socket. Let it spin for 2 seconds or so making sure it hits the bottom and around the sides. If a socket still gives me trouble I will move the wire on the tab to the nipple and also make sure the connection to the base is solid. Of all the pinball machines I have gone through I’ve only had to replace a handful of sockets. Mind you, I am not trying to make them brand new, just reliable player machines. Have never had to go back in and fix any sockets so this method works well for me.

    #9 10 days ago
    Quoted from statictrance:

    Ronnie - I saw this in another thread, but haven't tried it yet. Any advice on speed? I'm assuming just get it in there and hit the edges/bottom as best you can and give it a try? I'll be the first to admit flakey light sockets have been one of the last things I've worried about in my collection and I'm just getting to the point to start reviewing these. (I'd rather get them up and flipping first, then worry about lights... and usually I have a new project in before I get to the lights... 17 machines later... haha)

    Use your high speed setting. Try and get the interior sides of the socket and the bottom spring nub inside the socket

    #10 10 days ago
    Quoted from Ronnie1114:

    Use a Dremel tool and a 443-2 bit. Dip it in a bit of rubbing alcohol and run it in the socket for a couple of seconds. Works almost every time.

    I have a Dremel tool and might try your suggestion first , then replace if necessary.
    Can you tell me more on this 443-2 Bit? I don't speak Dremel...lol

    #11 10 days ago

    Replace with a new socket and bulb and move on, trust me it's the only way to go.

    John

    #12 10 days ago
    Quoted from Dayhuff:

    Replace with a new socket and bulb and move on, trust me it's the only way to go.
    John

    I agree, spent a ton of time cleaning a bunch during a MH restoration, ended up just buying new because they were still flaky... Biggest problem though was people having them in stock, had to go through 3 different companies to get all I needed.

    #13 10 days ago
    Quoted from CUJO:

    I have a Dremel tool and might try your suggestion first , then replace if necessary.
    Can you tell me more on this 443-2 Bit? I don't speak Dremel...lol

    Every Dremel brand tip has a number desigination associated with it. If you just throw Dremel 443-2 into Google, it comes up with the right one. Has a little nub of metal bristles on the end. You can sometimes find them at local hardware stores, but not usually the big ones.

    #14 10 days ago

    This obviously won't repair sockets that are physically damaged in any way. If the nub that the wire is soldered on to is loose at all, that socket just needs to be replaced.

    #15 9 days ago
    Quoted from mrm_4:

    I agree, spent a ton of time cleaning a bunch during a MH restoration, ended up just buying new because they were still flaky...

    For sure. Never understood why people wanted to waste so much time and effort to save what? .75 cents by not buying a socket since I'm assuming there at least replacing the bulb. Replace the socket and the bulb once and be done with it the rest of your life.

    John

    #16 9 days ago

    Sometimes it's not the nipple-tab connection but the socket-bracket connection that's bad. When that's the case, it takes very little time and effort to connect the bracket to the socket with a little solder.

    #17 9 days ago

    Some folks have more time on their hands to clean sockets. Replace them on bally games and then stand back and admire your work. You cant polish a turd.

    #18 9 days ago
    Quoted from Dayhuff:

    For sure. Never understood why people wanted to waste so much time and effort to save what? .75 cents by not buying a socket since I'm assuming there at least replacing the bulb. Replace the socket and the bulb once and be done with it the rest of your life.

    John

    The way I do it as mentioned above takes wayyyy less time the replacing a socket

    #19 9 days ago
    Quoted from Ronnie1114:

    Every Dremel brand tip has a number desigination associated with it. If you just throw Dremel 443-2 into Google, it comes up with the right one. Has a little nub of metal bristles on the end. You can sometimes find them at local hardware stores, but not usually the big ones.

    I Googled it earlier and got nada and now when I add Dremel to the PN, I got the pic and specs on Amazon.
    I think I have that brush so will try it and if it doesn't help, replace the socket.
    It's the 5X insert light on Caveman so it's not like I have a bunch to do. It's the only one that comes on when it's in a good mood and I'm playing well!

    Thanks.

    #20 8 days ago

    Well, it isn't the socket afterall. Turns out there is an issue on the signal input side of the 5X light. I jumpered the 4X light to the 5X light and then the 5X light flashes together w/ the 4X light.
    It's the yellow green wire so time to pull a schematic out to see where it goes to upstream.

    #21 7 days ago

    Update: Stumped.
    See pics.
    I jumpered the wire on bulb socket 5X to Connector A3J4 Pin 5 and got continuity beep on DVM. (looked at schematic)
    However I get beeps on every pin in the connector??
    Trying to trace the wire to the board connector to see if there is a break.
    Am I going about this the wrong way? I know the bulb socket is good from prior test.
    And what does the 544 mean in the little box?
    Thanks if you have any experience in Gottliebs (as I do not).

    IMG_20190316_143513 (resized).jpgIMG_20190316_143522 (resized).jpgIMG_20190316_144058 (resized).jpg
    #22 7 days ago
    Quoted from CUJO:

    And what does the 544 mean in the little box?

    my guess would be wire color code

    #23 7 days ago
    Quoted from DNO:

    my guess would be wire color code

    Yes DNO. Thanks.
    544 makes the wire color: GREEN, YELLOW, YELLOW.
    And in the pic of the socket, that's what the wire color is.

    Now for the Part2, the harder part of what am I missing here...

    #24 6 days ago

    Would anyone know what transistor drives the controlled lamp for L32 (5X) so I can test it?

    #25 6 days ago
    Quoted from CUJO:

    Would anyone know what transistor drives the controlled lamp for L32 (5X) so I can test it?

    Q33 which should be in your manual, just on a different page (it's on the driver board schematic page instead of the wiring page which I think is what the pic you posted above is)

    #26 5 days ago
    Quoted from slochar:

    Q33 which should be in your manual, just on a different page (it's on the driver board schematic page instead of the wiring page which I think is what the pic you posted above is)

    Great help. Thanks.
    Found it's location on A3 Driver Board.
    Parts list shows it as a MPS-A13 NPN Darlington.
    Gonna pull the board and test.

    #27 5 days ago

    Tried to google how to test this MPSA13 but not much.
    Test it the same way as a TIP102 or TIP122 for readings?

    #28 5 days ago

    Update: Reseated the A3J3 connector after cleaning card edge contacts.
    5X light now working! It would appear the yellow sticker designation was on the wrong connector.
    The top left connector was where I thought to look (A3J4) but it was actually the middle left black connector that was the issue. (A3J3)
    I dunno but seems the factory put the wrong sticker on the wrong connector which threw me off the trail.

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