(Topic ID: 143181)

Best solvent to repair pinball ramps and plastics...end of story


By wantdataeast

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 62 posts
  • 27 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by gregh
  • Topic is favorited by 145 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 30 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    IMG_6016.jpg
    IMG_6017.jpg
    20140816_181223.jpg
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-06_at_9.28.06_PM.png
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-06_at_9.26.59_PM.png
    IMG_2300.jpg
    IMG_2043_copy.jpg
    IMG_2162.jpg
    IMG_2024.jpg
    IMG_2025.jpg
    IMG_2027.jpg
    IMG_2028.jpg
    IMG_2029_1.jpg
    IMG_2029.jpg
    IMG_2015.jpg
    IMG_1707.jpg

    There are 62 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    13
    #1 3 years ago

    What is the best glue to repair pinball ramps and plastics?

    I hope this information contributes to the final answer to this question.

    The product is called: 
Weld-on - SciGrip Smarter Adhesive Solutions
    3 Very Fast Set - Clear, water thin solvent cement
    (used with the applicator shown)

    It is one of the solvent cements that the plexiglass industry uses.
    It works so well that it is considered welding…not gluing.

    First of all I have no idea what ALL “plastic” pinball ramps are made of but, the few I have worked with seem to be made of polycarbonate. Also, I have no idea when pinball machines began using polycarbonate plastics, but it is unlikely that it was earlier than 1970, because it was only in 1970 that they perfected making “glass-clear” polycarbonate.

    Most pinsiders have heard of the Lexan washers that protect play field plastics from breaking. Lexan is a brand name for polycarbonate. Lexan (polycarbonate plastic) takes a whack much better than plexiglass (acrylic); so it is a reasonable assumption that most modern games are using polycarbonate in all ball impact areas.

    This stuff has a VERY fast working time of 1 minute, fixture time of 7 minutes, 80% strength in 24hours (and about as strong as it is going to get at 48 hours)

    No need to give your plastic “bite” by roughing it up. In fact, you want smooth surfaces. Capillary action will suck it in place.

    CONS: Weld-on solvent cement is easier to use on plexiglass (acetate) because it drys clear on plexiglass (acetate) if you make a mistake and accidentally drip some of it on the surface of your material (don’t attempt to wipe up a mistake, it will evaporate)

    But unfortunately, if you make a mistake on polycarbonate it will not dry clear, it will cloud your clear material. So when working with it LESS IS MORE.

    The secret of joining any two pieces of plastic is having the applicator (and figuring out how to use it without dripping) and letting the capillary action do its job, and most of all practice makes perfect.

    Capillary Action:
    This can have its cons as well. You will be tempted to tape two broken halves of plastic together before joining them. That is a mistake, because capillary action can suck the liquid up under the tape which can ugly-up the visible surface of your play field plastic. Don’t get me wrong, you can use tape to hold two pieces of plastic together, but just make sure the tape does not touch the crack you are attempting to join; use a toothpick to raise it from the surface slightly. so basically if you use tape to hold your two pieces together keep the tape off the surface of the plastic so the solvent will not travel under it as well.

    IMG_2159.jpg

    IMG_2160.jpg

    IMG_2161.jpg

    #2 3 years ago

    Strength experiment:
    I put my Addams Family play field in a service position and glued two 1/16 inch thick strips of polycarbonate plastic to part of the plastic near the swamp under the play field. I let it adhere for 48hours. On one strip I used Weld-on solvent cement, the other strip i used epoxy (seen in position below the other, was a total fail)

    I then tried to break the Weld-on joint by stressing it with weight. After putting nearly 19 pounds of weight the weld would not fail.

    The plastic was even being pulled in a direction where weight should have sort of peeled it apart, but still the joint would not fail.

    BTW the epoxy piece literally pop off when I touched it (you can see that one below the weld-on solvent one)

    I threw a mini clamp on the polycarbonate piece and wired a bag on the end and started adding weight
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_1.09.04_PM.png

    It would bend, but the joint would not break.
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_1.10.25_PM.png

    I actually became more worried I would break the plastic gutter on the pinball machine.
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_1.11.53_PM.png

    I put over 18 pounds of steel junk weight on it but could not break the joint
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_1.13.41_PM.png
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_1.14.07_PM.png

    Ultimately I had to cut off the test piece, the joined hunk is part of my pinball forever
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_1.14.49_PM.png

    #3 3 years ago

    I used something similar works amazing

    #4 3 years ago

    Very cool, I like the strength test. Thank you for sharing!

    #5 3 years ago

    Now, that;s strong.

    #6 3 years ago

    I have not fixed any ramps yet, but I did butt joint some plastic together with that and it held like a MF.

    Good stuff.

    #7 3 years ago

    I later used Weld-on solvent cement to join two pieces of polycarbonate (and let set for 48 hours). I found that the bond was stronger than the original piece of polycarbonate. The weld shown no signs of failure after 58 lbs.

    It is tough to see what I did here so I will explain.

    The joined area was probably 3/8 x 3/8 of an inch.
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_3.14.52_PM.png

    I attached then suspended a bucket from the pieces and added every bit of steel I could I could find.
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_3.11.44_PM.png
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_3.12.30_PM.png

    My wired together testing rig broke before welded joint did.

    58 pounds of steel... no stress to the joined area.
    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_3.10.05_PM.png

    Screen_Shot_2015-11-01_at_3.08.13_PM.png

    After the rig broke this is what the piece looked like...as you can see the joint is unchanged.
    IMG_2043 copy.JPG

    #8 3 years ago

    Here was my first experience using the Weld-on solvent cement to repair and reenforce my Addams Family ramp.

    I had a break on my ramp were it is held in place by the screw, so I wanted to graft a piece of polycarbonate in there.
    IMG_1707.JPG

    So carved out a bit break in my ramp with my Dremel.

    Then put a piece of 1/16th polycarbonate on the bottom, I clamped it primarily because when I clamped it down to my grafted piece the two parts joined a bit more flat and that is essential for the capillary action to suck the stuff in and get you a good even adhesion.

    IMG_2015.JPG

    I only let it set up for about a half hour then I unclamped.
    IMG_2024.JPG

    In the mean time I had carved another piece of 1/16 inch polycarbonate and placed it in the broke area.
    IMG_2025.JPG

    then added solvent and held it in place until it set-up

    IMG_2028.JPG

    and finally another piece

    This was my end result. It is FAR stronger than the original and I am confident it will never fail again.

    IMG_2029.jpg

    Again, this was my first experiment. I am sure it would look better with practice.
    IMG_2162.jpg

    I ended up adding another shot of the solvent after I was done, which as you can see clouded it a bit. I did not really care, I was more interested in strength than beauty, and you really can not see it anyway unless you are looking for it. It is now solid as a rock.

    #9 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    I have not fixed any ramps yet, but I did butt joint some plastic together with that and it held like a MF.
    Good stuff.

    The secret is definitely learning to use the applicator to cut down the dripping.
    Here is a great video to learn how to use the applicator

    #10 3 years ago

    Gonna have to try this stuff

    #11 3 years ago

    Thanks for sharing.

    #12 3 years ago

    Nice demonstration, thanks.

    The only thing I would add is that Weld-on #4 is less likely to cloud the plastic then #3. It requires 72 hrs for 80% strength but the solvent evaporates completely leaving no marks. Don't try to wipe up any excess and the repair will be invisible.

    Solvent welding with methylene chloride is the ticket for polycarbonate repair but keep in mind it's a dangerous solvent so maintain good ventilation and safety practices.

    #13 3 years ago

    Attee with post- I have done some acrylic work on aquariums and this type of weld is the only way to go. Not the same material but similar handling properties and I only ever weld joints. I use the same principal- same applicator- same everything and it is by far and away the best way to weld overlap. It also will hold edge to edge welds fairly well but you need a very well joined edge- it has absolutely no glue properties, there is nothing in the solvent that remains after it evaporates. It is basically a solvent that dissolves the plastic at the joint and penetrates each joined surface a lttle ways- so basically your creating a new piece of plastic at the joint, made from a bit of both halves of the joint. Thus- its vital that the pieces are tightly opposed- so the plastics can melt together. This type of repair will not bridge even a small gap or air void- it des not work that way.

    Its awesome for many things. Just a lot different than a glue or epoxy joint. If you had roughed up the joined ends woth the epoxy and carefully chosen brand and type it would have held a lot better. If you need to add material to fill in small voids and join a piece- this is not the path you want to take.

    #14 3 years ago

    Great info.

    #15 3 years ago
    Quoted from rplante:

    Nice demonstration, thanks.
    The only thing I would add is that Weld-on #4 is less likely to cloud the plastic then #3. It requires 72 hrs for 80% strength but the solvent evaporates completely leaving no marks. Don't try to wipe up any excess and the repair will be invisible.
    Solvent welding with methylene chloride is the ticket for polycarbonate repair but keep in mind it's a dangerous solvent so maintain good ventilation and safety practices.

    I will have to try #4. But the clouding with #3 is really only an issue if you mess up and drip it on a open surface, if you do it properly with the applicator and let the capillary action suck it in, your joint will clear. If you are new to the solvent watch the video above and learn how to use the applicator before trying it.

    I am sure this stuff would really kick some butt just joining some snapped plastics (like vid mentioned above). My experience has been less-is-best with this stuff...meaning avoid adding "just a little more"; which for the life of me is a lesson I will never learn.

    Also, regarding drips I experienced a worse problem with clouding on the polycarbonate material than regular acrylic.

    #16 3 years ago

    When I was building plastic models, I made an applicator for the super glue by drilling a small hole in a piece of sprue (the round plastic tree that holds the model parts), bending a staple in half & inserting the bent end into the hole & super gluing it in place. Dip the staple into the glue & capillary action would draw the glue up into the staple. Touch the staple to the seam & capillary action would draw the glue into it. Never had any spillage. Mind you, it wouldn't hold very much glue.

    #17 3 years ago
    Quoted from wantdataeast:

    But the clouding with #3 is really only an issue if you mess up and drip it on a open surface

    That's exactly what I did and thought I would have a mess on my hands. The following morning there was absolutely no evidence of it. I was pleasantly surprised.

    My application was a bit different then yours however. I was edge welding a broken playfield plastic. I've repaired a couple now and found it best to apply the solvent from the non-art side (top) where any fogging would be apparent. If applied from the screened side some ink damage may occur.

    I can say that this technique works very well but only time will tell just how durable the bond is. Your demonstration does gives me reason to believe it's the best option available.

    #18 3 years ago

    Do you have a link for the best place to buy this?

    #19 3 years ago

    Great information. Thanks for sharing.

    The Touch-n-Flow Applicator uses capillary action to apply small controlled amounts of solvent.

    http://www.flex-i-file.com/adhesives.php

    #20 3 years ago
    Quoted from QuarterGrabber:

    Do you have a link for the best place to buy this?

    Okay so here is the #3
    amazon.com link »

    Here is the #4
    amazon.com link »

    I have never used the #4 and the dude in the video recommends the #3 on polycarbonates here:
    https://www.youtube.com/embed/3KzZDi-aXD4?autoplay=1&rel=0

    He is pretty specific about #3 usage with polycarbonate (which is what pin ramps and plastics (at least on the modern pins) are made of, he does not specify anything about #4 but it sounds like it is maybe for polycarbonates as well...with just a slower set time. rplante above mentioned using #4, but I have no experience with it. Again, I am not exactly an expert with it.

    The stuff is cheap enough per can, I would guess someone here will buy both and compare them.

    You need to buy an applicator, or two (which you can see on amazon in the "customers who bought this also bought this" area.

    #21 3 years ago
    Quoted from wantdataeast:

    Okay so here is the #3
    amazon.com link »
    Here is the #4
    amazon.com link »
    I have never used the #4 and the dude in the video recommends the #3 on polycarbonates here:
    https://www.youtube.com/embed/3KzZDi-aXD4?autoplay=1&rel=0
    He is pretty specific about #3 usage with polycarbonate (which is what pin ramps and plastics (at least on the modern pins) are made of, he does not specify anything about #4 but it sounds like it is maybe for polycarbonates as well...with just a slower set time. rplante above mentioned using #4, but I have no experience with it. Again, I am not exactly an expert with it.
    The stuff is cheap enough per can, I would guess someone here will buy both and compare them.
    You need to buy an applicator, or two (which you can see on amazon in the "customers who bought this also bought this" area.

    OMG it's sooooo cheap! Thanks man!

    #22 3 years ago
    Quoted from Topher5000:

    When I was building plastic models, I made an applicator for the super glue by drilling a small hole in a piece of sprue (the round plastic tree that holds the model parts), bending a staple in half & inserting the bent end into the hole & super gluing it in place. Dip the staple into the glue & capillary action would draw the glue up into the staple. Touch the staple to the seam & capillary action would draw the glue into it. Never had any spillage. Mind you, it wouldn't hold very much glue.

    You could have just gotten the staple hot with a candle and it would have melted in

    Basically the applicator is dull syringe needle. You guys have to remember that the applicator is made to help some plastic fabricator design some big ass plexiglass box or whatever, the applicator might hold an ounce.

    But for a Pinhead joining couple of broken pieces of play field plastic back together... drop might be enough for a 1 inch crack.

    #23 3 years ago

    I have been using Plastex to repair or recreate plastic pieces. It's REALLY strong too, but not nearly as cheap.

    #24 3 years ago

    Yeah each polymer responds better to a particular adhesive or solvent. No one "glue" works with all types of plastic. The styrenics and plastics with low chemical resistance are joined better with solvents rather than glue.

    IPS makes a "SciGrip" for just about every type of plastic. It's good stuff.

    Here's what I use for ABS. It's a solvent too:

    IMG_2300.JPG

    #25 3 years ago

    This worked really great for me... Do you know how you removed a screw from a ramp and you can see bunch of little hair line stress cracks just waiting grow?
    Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 9.26.59 PM.png

    The solvent will not react to metal, to fix all the hair line cracks around your screw holes (obviously this is AFTER you have removed the ramp) place your screw back in a bit, give the the screw a tiny bit of solvent right where it is touching the plastic.

    The capillary action will suck the solvent in the cracks. After a few seconds or so unscrew the screw and let it dry.

    NO more stress cracks.

    Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 9.28.06 PM.png

    #26 3 years ago
    Quoted from rufessor:

    you need a very well joined edge- it has absolutely no glue properties, there is nothing in the solvent that remains after it evaporates. It is basically a solvent that dissolves the plastic at the joint and penetrates each joined surface a lttle ways- so basically your creating a new piece of plastic at the joint, made from a bit of both halves of the joint. Thus- its vital that the pieces are tightly opposed- so the plastics can melt together. This type of repair will not bridge even a small gap or air void- it des not work that way.

    Exactly right ^

    You are creating a new piece of plastic at the joint. The stuff is not glue it is a solvent

    sol·vent definition: "able to dissolve other substances."

    So while you will go to your grave, as will I, calling it a glue. It ain't!
    Used properly it dissolves the plastic where is applied and erased the crack from existence.

    #27 3 years ago
    Quoted from QuarterGrabber:

    I have been using Plastex to repair or recreate plastic pieces. It's REALLY strong too, but not nearly as cheap.

    Plastex serves a different purpose in my opinion. I use Plastex when I need to recreate a piece--like a broken mounting tab. It's been used for years on dirt bikes and it will stand up to a beating.

    #28 3 years ago

    To the best of my knowledge, older ramps where made from butyrate and modern ramps from PETG. Maybe Vid (or someone) can confirm this.

    If that is correct does that change which solvent would be recommended?

    Great discussion guys.

    #29 3 years ago
    Quoted from terryb:

    To the best of my knowledge, older ramps where made from butyrate and modern ramps from PETG. Maybe Vid (or someone) can confirm this.
    If that is correct does that change which solvent would be recommended?
    Great discussion guys.

    Talking to the guys that sell plastic at my local store, specific solvents vary from plastic to plastic. This Weld-on product specifies: Styrene, Butyrate, polycarbonate with an overall labeling of “ACRYLICS”.

    So it would really be great to find that the older ramps were butyrate. Some testing needs to be done, I do not have access to broken play field plastic or I would test it myself. Anyone that has some broken play field / ramp plastic should get some of this solvent and repair a break and stress the hell out of it a few tests. (<-- Vid I am looking at you

    It would really be great be able to removed glue/ epoxy from the playfield restoration equation, in lieu of a cheaper much more effective solution.

    #30 3 years ago
    Quoted from terryb:

    Plastex serves a different purpose in my opinion. I use Plastex when I need to recreate a piece--like a broken mounting tab. It's been used for years on dirt bikes and it will stand up to a beating.

    Yes I agree. The reason I mentioned Plastex is because the op posted an example above where he recreated a screw tab using the solvent and I think Plastex would have done a much better job for that particular application. But as far as glueing plastics together, this product looks great! (And btw you probably don't remember but you are the one that introduced me to Plastex )

    #31 3 years ago

    Good grief, I wish this topic had come up 3 weeks ago. I had the front leading edge of the WABAC ramp on my Rocky and Bullwinkle crack off cleanly, and no I did not have cliffy ramp protectors on there but I will be changing that. So I had to go on a search for an NOS ramp and then the WABAC sticker decal to replace.

    Now I am thinking I could weld the broken piece of plastic back on using this technique, put a cliffy ramp protector over it, and it will be as good as new. This leaves me with some NOS stuff I need to go back on eBay and unload.

    #32 3 years ago
    Quoted from wantdataeast:

    Talking to the guys that sell plastic at my local store, specific solvents vary from plastic to plastic. This Weld-on product specifies: Styrene, Butyrate, polycarbonate with an overall labeling of “ACRYLICS”.

    Is PETG a polycarbonate plastic?

    QuarterGrabber, do you have any photos of repairs you've done with Plastex?

    I don't mean to derail the thread, but it would be nice to have the main ramp repair techniques in one place.

    #33 3 years ago
    Quoted from wantdataeast:

    So it would really be great to find that the older ramps were butyrate.

    Probably one of the earliest games with a clear ramp would be Comet, so that could be a good test bed.

    #34 3 years ago
    Quoted from mrbillishere:

    Good grief, I wish this topic had come up 3 weeks ago. I had the front leading edge of the WABAC ramp on my rocky and bullwinkle crack off cleanly, and no I did not have cliffy ramp protectors on there but I will be changing that. So I had to go on a search for an NOS ramp and then the WABAC sticker decal to replace.
    Now I am thinking I could weld the broken piece of plastic back on using this technique, put a cliffy ramp protector over it, and it will be as good as new. This leaves me with some NOS stuff I need to go back on eBay and unload.

    I have the exact same ramp issue, although I have not yet sourced new ramps. So I'll have to give this a shot.

    #35 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Probably one of the earliest games with a clear ramp would be Comet, so that could be a good test bed.

    I am more curious what the old playfield plastics were made of

    #36 3 years ago
    Quoted from wantdataeast:

    I am more curious what the old playfield plastics were made of

    Butyrate, that's why they stink like vomit.

    #37 3 years ago
    Quoted from terryb:

    Is PETG a polycarbonate plastic?

    PETG is a type of polyethylene

    Polyethylene Terephthlate Glycol-Modified

    #38 3 years ago

    So are the products mentioned fine for PETG, or is there another option that SCIGRIP offers that is better?

    http://www.scigrip.com/product.php?id=72

    #39 3 years ago
    Quoted from terryb:

    So are the products mentioned fine for PETG, or is there another option that SCIGRIP offers that is better?
    http://www.scigrip.com/product.php?id=72

    This product seems to be for metal and rubber products. The ops cool screw trick for fixing hairline cracks wouldn't work with this product.

    #40 3 years ago
    Quoted from terryb:

    So are the products mentioned fine for PETG, or is there another option that SCIGRIP offers that is better?
    http://www.scigrip.com/product.php?id=72

    No idea man... buy it and experiment around. This whole topic is uncharted territory as far as I am concerned. Right now we know that the #3, that I started the thread with, works at least on Butyrate so it says on the label (which the pinball oracle vid has notes is the material in the play field plastics of not very recent machines) I used #3 to attach a polycarbonate piece to the plastic on the underside of Addams Family (see above) and I could not get it to fail in my stress test. So in that case if the Addams family gutter (or whatever the hell that plastic gutter thing under the play field is called) was made of PETG, then we know that #3 attached polycarbonate to PETG; if that is the case it should attach PETG to PETG... you would think.

    Again I do not know what type of plastic my Addams family ramp plastic is, it just seem to behave like polycarbonate, so I made the guess that was what it was.

    But one thing is for certain regular plexiglass breaks like a mother. but polycarbonate bends (Lexan is a polycarbonate) and #3 works perfectly with both of those. So the #3 has at pretty wide range of use between those two very different types of plastics.

    #41 3 years ago

    You can see that some ramps are vacuum formed in a mold, and some are injection molded.

    So even on a single game like Whitewater you could have two different ramp plastics

    #42 3 years ago

    Ambroid Pro Weld

    Wicked sh!t .....if you can find it.

    amazon.com link »

    #43 3 years ago
    #44 3 years ago

    Some plastics require glue and others are better-suited for solvents to bond. The model kits we all assembled as kids were injection molded from polystyrene which is another polymer with low chemical resistance. That means that solvents like MEK will dissolve it.

    The Testers model glue we all used (and some on here probably sniffed) was not really glue. It's a solvent that melts the polystyrene and allows you to "weld" two pieces together.

    Plastics that have higher chemical resistance require actual "glues" to bond them together. The same is true for gluing two dissimilar polymers where one has high chemical resistance or gluing to a non-plastic surface.

    PET is polyester and can be glued with solvents. You won't get as good results using epoxy or glue.

    Probably the most-widely used PET in pinball is Mylar (which is a Dupont trade name for biaxially-oriented PET film). Soda pop bottles are also biaxially-oriented which is why they are so strong. Biaxial orientation refers to mechanically aligning the molecular chains in two directions.

    I work in the plastics industry and mold PET bottles as well as other injection molded and blow molded products.

    I use that ABS glue I showed a picture of earlier to repair speaker grills that are molded from glass-reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene which is polystyrene with a rubber impact modifier added to increase the impact strength. Fiberglass is also added to further increase the strength. By using the solvent you are actually welding the plastic rather than relying on a glue to stick to each surface and bond.

    #45 3 years ago
    Quoted from Gatecrasher:

    Some plastics require glue and others are better-suited for solvents to bond. The model kits we all assembled as kids were injection molded from polystyrene which is another polymer with low chemical resistance. That means that solvents like MEK will dissolve it.
    The Testers model glue we all used (and some on here probably sniffed) was not really glue. It's a solvent that melts the polystyrene and allows you to "weld" two pieces together.
    Plastics that have higher chemical resistance require actual "glues" to bond them together. The same is true for gluing two dissimilar polymers where one has high chemical resistance or gluing to a non-plastic surface.
    PET is polyester and can be glued with solvents. You won't get as good results using epoxy or glue.
    Probably the most-widely used PET in pinball is Mylar (which is a Dupont trade name for biaxially-oriented PET film). Soda pop bottles are also biaxially-oriented which is why they are so strong. Biaxial orientation refers to mechanically aligning the molecular chains in two directions.
    I work in the plastics industry and mold PET bottles as well as other injection molded and blow molded products.
    I use that ABS glue I showed a picture of earlier to repair speaker grills that are molded from glass-reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene which is polystyrene with a rubber impact modifier added to increase the impact strength. Fiberglass is also added to further increase the strength. By using the solvent you are actually welding the plastic rather than relying on a glue to stick to each surface and bond.

    Great info. Thanks.

    #46 3 years ago

    Wish the previous owner sometime in the past of my Hook knew this...

    20140816_181223.jpg

    Literately the only thing wrong with the machine. Someday someone will make Windcoaster ramps,,,, someday...

    #47 3 years ago

    FYI I worked as a tech for MTL/Arachnid when they were developing their first soft tip dart boards. ABS was the plastic of choice in the day and we used MEK to weld the parts together.

    1 week later
    #48 3 years ago

    Will ABS or PVC solvent cement work on polycarbonate? I googled 'Will ABS <PVC> solvent work on polycarbonate' but didn't get any results. A place nearby sells the poly, but only carries Weld-On 16, which is gooey & comes in a tube. If I have to, I'll order some Weld-On 4 online.

    #49 3 years ago
    Quoted from indypinhead:

    Ambroid Pro Weld
    Wicked sh!t .....if you can find it.
    amazon.com link »

    It's totally gone man Aside from that one guy trying to get $400 for the last bottle on earth. I switched over to Plast-I-Weld.

    #50 3 years ago
    Quoted from DefaultGen:

    It's totally gone man
    indypinhead said:

    Ambroid Pro Weld
    Wicked sh!t .....if you can find it.
    amazon.com link »
    Aside from that one guy trying to get $400 for the last bottle on earth. I switched over to Plast-I-Weld.

    AFAIK this is the same stuff with a different name:
    http://www.flex-i-file.com/adhesives.php

    I used to use Ambroid as well and this seems to have "almost" identical qualities.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    From: $ 218.00
    Lighting - Backbox
    Lermods
    $ 19.95
    $ 99.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 129.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lermods
    $ 25.50
    $ 15.00
    Playfield - Decals
    Metal-Mods
    $ 85.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    $ 99.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 89.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 26.00
    Electronics
    Yorktown Parts and Equip
    From: $ 80.00
    Lighting - Interactive
    Pinball Z
    From: $ 99.99
    Cabinet - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 109.95
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Hookedonpinball.com
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 90.00
    Lighting - Under Cabinet
    Rock Custom Pinball
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    From: € 25.00
    Flipper Parts
    TheDudeMods
    $ 99.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 114.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 159.00
    $ 64.00
    $ 12.99
    $ 29.99
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 15.00
    Playfield - Decals
    Metal-Mods
    There are 62 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside