(Topic ID: 314278)

Best soldering kit less than $50

By Parkshow30

2 years ago


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    #1 2 years ago

    What’s the current best soldering kit setup for under $50? I know these threads have been made before but with everything having gone up recently some recommendations for last year aren’t as relevant. Just replacing a cheap iron that is worn out and would like something a little better that will last.
    Thanks

    #2 2 years ago

    I'm no soldering pro and I am not doing any board work, but this station has served me well for my purposes.

    ebay.com link: itm

    #3 2 years ago

    I don't have an answer, but I do recommend getting something that doesn't use oddball tips. Or at least get a few extra tips.

    #4 2 years ago
    Quoted from LesManley:

    I'm no soldering pro and I am not doing any board work, but this station has served me well for my purposes.
    ebay.com link: itm

    I don't think that is temperature controlled. You can set the temp, but there's no circuitry to help maintain it. Plus I don't know if it's ESD safe.

    By no means knocking it, it's probably better than some of mine! Just wanted to point that out to the OP. Home Depot actually has a decent price on it too.

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    #5 2 years ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I don't think that is temperature controlled. You can set the temp, but there's no circuitry to help maintain it. Plus I don't know if it's ESD safe.
    By no means knocking it, it's probably better than some of mine! Just wanted to point that out to the OP. Home Depot actually has a decent price on it too.[quoted image]

    I've used this one for under playfield and board work for the past 6 years or so and never had an issue. Nothing fancy but it's worked fine for me .

    #6 2 years ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I don't think that is temperature controlled. You can set the temp, but there's no circuitry to help maintain it. Plus I don't know if it's ESD safe.
    By no means knocking it, it's probably better than some of mine! Just wanted to point that out to the OP. Home Depot actually has a decent price on it too.[quoted image]

    That’s a good price and I need to hit up Home Depot for some grass seed on my way home from work one day this week. Thanks for the tip!

    #7 2 years ago
    Quoted from grantopia:

    I've used this one for under playfield and board work for the past 6 years or so and never had an issue. Nothing fancy but it's worked fine for me .

    I think so many are ESD safe nowadays, that it's probably more the norm than anything, at least for a bench top iron. But if I was getting a new one, I'd probably make sure it's ESD safe just to be on the safe side given some of the newer electronics likely aren't as forgiving. Or at least ground the tip prior to doing board work (i.e. Spike 2 CPU). Can't say I've looked at any of the ESD ratings on any of the IC's tho.

    #8 2 years ago

    Hopefully I won’t need to know if it works well for awhile. Just repaired my Judge Dredd and my old iron wouldn’t hack it, had to borrow my Dads which looks very similar to that one and it worked great. All my games are in good working order for now…

    #9 2 years ago

    Watch this video:

    #10 2 years ago

    Newark mentions it's ESD safe, but don't see that on the data sheet.

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    #11 2 years ago
    Quoted from Parkshow30:

    Hopefully I won’t need to know if it works well for awhile. Just repaired my Judge Dredd and my old iron wouldn’t hack it, had to borrow my Dads which looks very similar to that one and it worked great. All my games are in good working order for now…

    So getting back to my temperature comment...

    You can set the Weller temperature but there's nothing telling the iron to maintain it. i.e. Try to solder something large...it will cool down some and you might have to bump up the dial a bit. Nicer irons will attempt to maintain a constant temp.

    Just wanted to clarify that. You might want to get a larger chisel tip too, helps on larger parts.

    #12 2 years ago

    I've had this Hakko for 6 years and it's worked great for board work as well as under the playfield for things like coils. It uses standard Hakko t18 tips which are easy to find in a variety of styles but I mainly use a narrow chisel for pcb's and switch to a large one for coil lugs.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hakko-temperature-limiting-soldering-FX600/dp/B006MQD7M4

    #13 2 years ago

    I bought a WLC100 a few years back for doing some non-PCB work. A seller on ebay was clearing out dozens of unused irons in unopened boxes at $5 each.

    #14 2 years ago

    I have a Aoyue 937+ station I’m not using, yours for cost of shipping.

    #15 2 years ago
    Quoted from radium:

    I have a Aoyue 937+ station I’m not using, yours for cost of shipping.

    Wow that’s super generous of you. I’ll send you a PM

    #16 2 years ago
    Quoted from Parkshow30:

    Wow that’s super generous of you. I’ll send you a PM

    Sure thing!

    #17 2 years ago
    Quoted from latenite04:

    I've had this Hakko for 6 years and it's worked great for board work as well as under the playfield for things like coils. It uses standard Hakko t18 tips which are easy to find in a variety of styles but I mainly use a narrow chisel for pcb's and switch to a large one for coil lugs.
    amazon.com link »

    Have this Hakko too. It is better than anything you'll find at the big box stores for the same price. It is hot and consistent.

    2 weeks later
    #18 2 years ago

    Radium sent me the soldering station and less than a week after I got it I needed to try it out. Tonight my upper right flipper on Judge Dredd wouldn’t hold up. Lifted the playfield and one of the wires on the flipper coil had become completely detached. Fired up the new soldering station, it got hot real quick, and had the wire back on in seconds. Flipper works perfect and had a great game right after that getting to Ultimate Challenge again.

    Since this is my first temperature controlled soldering station, what are some recommended temps to use? Would it be the same for soldering a wire on a lug as it would be for replacing a transistor on the board? Also, I’m guessing the reading is in Celsius as the starting temp was 200 when I turned it on and it went up to 480? Can’t remember what the top was.

    #19 2 years ago

    Honestly it's more about skill level than temp at times. And the tip size too.

    We typically used 700F to 800F Metcal irons at work (I'm retired now) for some of the high power parts, but we also used those for almost everything. Personally, I think too little heat for far too long is more of an issue than hotter and very brief time on a pad. I'd use a small pointed tip down to about 0603 parts (0.06" x 0.03") parts (res, caps, ind). Anything smaller (like a 0402), I'd switch to a smaller tip. Not because of heat, but more about the small tip size.

    #20 2 years ago

    If this if your first soldering station I would also recommend picking up a tip cleaner. I prefer them over sponges

    https://www.amazon.com/Soldering-Iron-Tip-Cleaner-Black/dp/B00J66FSY2

    #21 2 years ago
    Quoted from bigguybbr:

    If this if your first soldering station I would also recommend picking up a tip cleaner. I prefer them over sponges
    amazon.com link »

    First temp controlled soldering station. I’ve been using soldering irons for a long time, they were always just the basic on or off type. I usually used the sponge that came with them, I will have to check this type out never seen it before.

    #22 2 years ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    too little heat for far too long is more of an issue than hotter and very brief time on a pad.

    Absolutely this. Kind of similar to how you can pull out a toaster oven rack with your finger if you're really quick with no damage to the finger.

    4 weeks later
    #23 2 years ago

    I just ran across this disoldering tool, cant beat the price...$6.05

    https://www.circuitspecialists.com/40-Watt-DeSoldering-Iron.html

    Desoldering Tool (resized).pngDesoldering Tool (resized).png
    #24 2 years ago

    if that worked it would be good. At only 40 watts I don't think it will get hot enough.

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