(Topic ID: 210400)

Basement flooded: Suggestions Please


By RyanClaytor

1 year ago



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  • 78 posts
  • 49 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by RyanClaytor
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    #1 1 year ago

    Hi Pinside,

    This all happened about 20 minutes ago, so I'm trying to get some informed feedback.

    My basement flooded due to a break in the PVC pipe leading from the sump pump to the outside. There's some standing water, but I'm trying to sop it up.

    Anyhow, we've had a really nice, dry basement (up until this point) so I'm looking for some suggestions on how to get it back that way. From the quick search I've done, carpent needs to be ripped-up, room needs to be aired out, and then disinfected to prevent mold.

    So...who has gone through this? What words of wisdom do you have after emerging on the other side of floodlandia?

    Thanks, all!
    -Ryan

    #2 1 year ago

    Yes, definitely rip up that carpet. Get some fans going asap and keep the air moving to avoid mold build up and it will help with the mildew smell over time as well. Stagnant air in damp conditions is where mold thriiiiives. If it got into any wood studs and you need to pull drywall get a meter at like home depot to measure the water content of the wood and make sure it is in a satisfactory range before redoing any of that as well. We had bad experiences with that on our new construction house. Snow while roof was going on , crawl spaced flooded and wood was too wet still months later when they put new flooring in. Bad stuff

    Really sorry this happened to you

    #3 1 year ago

    Get a dehumidifiier in there and run it until you get relative humidity down to 45-50%.

    Fix the pvc pipe and have the dehumidifier drain into the sump pit. It will take about a week to dry out.

    #4 1 year ago

    Oh no, good luck

    #5 1 year ago

    Get a commercial grade dehumidifier asap

    #6 1 year ago

    those carpet cleaners they sell at Walmart, Bissell..... they soak up water great, better than a shop vac, but you gotta empty 1000 times. that's what I used, works great

    #7 1 year ago

    3rd the dehumidifier. We've had some minor incidents in various places over the years, but the first (that sparked the dehumidifier purchase) was the worst. Standing water in carpet puddles in various spots, with a bookshelf in that area... by the time we found it, several books had swelled. I thought they were lost, but after running the DH for a day or two, you couldn't tell anything had happened. But you need to act fast!

    DH's and fans / air circulation are your best friend right now.

    Also use a shop vac and suck out all you can. When you think it's dry, suck out some more until you can't see any color change. If you get it quick enough and other environmentals go favorable, you can possibly save a lot of collateral damage and costly rework. Granted that only makes sense for smaller / incidental areas.... if you're talking entire rooms with water, then yeah, ripping out is probably best.

    #8 1 year ago

    Nothing worse, houses near me a few years ago after heavy rainfall had water more than a metre up their properties....
    took months to dry out...
    Hope you get sorted pal..........

    #9 1 year ago

    Sorry, I had that happen too. During superstorm Sandy. I couldn't get to a generator for a couple of days, either. Lost some appliances and water heater, but the furnace was spared. Moved a couple of my favorite pins out of the basement when it climbed to 8" deep just to be safe.

    Anyways, once I got the water pumped out: fans, fans fans! ...and dehumidifier. Get as many fans and dehumidifiers going as quick as possible. If you have drywall, cut around 10" up from the the waters high level and rip that out. If you've any carpet, wood or wood particle board shelving, boxes, or anything that can soak up water get it out of there. Squeegee, vac and mop out any standing water. Like they said, just keep drying it out for a about a week. We did not have to replace the studs, sometime a month or later we repaired all the drywall.

    #10 1 year ago

    If you have home insurance it’s likely that with a phone call to report this they will send a commercial service over ASAP to remove carpet and affected dry wall and install high power blowers and dehumidifier to dry. It saves them money vs having it sit and become a much larger issue going forward.

    #12 1 year ago

    Dehumidifier and a carpet fan.

    We had some water come in through our egress window (a whole other story). Saturated the carpet enough the water went between my toes while walking on it. We used a cheap shampoo vacuum to pull up some of the water (it is amazing how much water and what you will see being sucked up). Pulled the carpet up in that area and ran the carpet fan until everything was dry. We keep a dehumidifier set at 35-40% with the drain to the sump pump. Good luck to you. I remember that feeling when I walked on the carpet and felt the water on my feet.

    Edit: Just watched the video and I'm bummed for you. Good Luck.

    #13 1 year ago

    Sorry bud, lots of fans and dehumidifiers. Fans are important because otherwise one corner will dry and another will be wet yet. Move that air around so dehumidifiers can do the job.

    #14 1 year ago

    I've had this happen once as well and it can be stressful. It's nice that your asking for suggestions and not for donations!

    #15 1 year ago

    Deal with this correctly now and you'll be thankful for years. Not the time to cut corners. First, make sure you have some time off from work to deal with this over the couple of days. Second, look online for the closest place to rent a COMMERCIAL grade dehumidifier. Do NOT waste time, you'll need this unit working for the next few days and arrange to pick-it up later tonight. Next, get a friend, wife or neighbor and start cutting up that rug. Despite what anyone tells you, if you have had a considerable amount of water leak it will not dry from under that rug and it will mold. Next inspect the walls and moulding and see if they need to be repaired. Hopefully the carpet absorbed all of the excess water and it didn't get up into the woodwork. In a few months when this is over and you have new rugs installed you'll be happy again.

    Edit: My suggestions would be different if this was a basement without pinball machines and if you didn't use for entertaining friends. You really don't want friends down there enjoying your hobby and then going home wondering how you could stand to play in such a bad smelling basement.

    #16 1 year ago

    i wouldnt rip up the carpet just yet. can you get the water out with an extractor? extractor, fans, and dehu will save you i think.

    https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck-rental/Carpet-Extractor-W-Heater/56105285/

    #17 1 year ago
    Quoted from GGBGROUP:

    Next, get a friend, wife or neighbor and start cutting up that rug. Despite what anyone tells you, if you have had a considerable amount of water leak it will not dry from under that rug and it will mold.

    Why not dry it with an extractor? Will cost less to rent one than laying new carpet.

    #18 1 year ago

    Good luck to you! We are having a lot of flooding here today too and the first thing I'll do when I get home is make sure the sump pump has been chugging along today without issue...

    #19 1 year ago
    Quoted from Syco54645:

    Why not dry it with an extractor? Will cost less to rent one than laying new carpet.

    I used a cheap shampoo vacuum (obviously not the caliber you are suggesting, but same idea) for hours pulling water out of the carpet and emptying the container hundreds of times until very little water would suck up into the vacuum. I then pulled the carpet up and the pad was still saturated. That's when I went and got the fans. Fortunately I know someone that installs carpet and he brought over 2 carpet fans and it dried everything up within about 4 days. You will not get all the water out with just an extractor.

    #20 1 year ago

    Very sorry to hear this. I'd sacrifice the carpet rather than trying to save it. Safer - you don't want any chance of mold, with the boy playing down there. All the best - I'm sure you'll get it all back to 'nice' again real soon.

    12
    #21 1 year ago

    Hopefully otaku will jump in on this thread. From what I hear he's a pro at dealing with flooded basements.

    In a more serious reply...you have drywall or insulation? Drywall typically has organic compounds in it, as well as insulation. "Green board" is drywall that won't wick water. You can usually cut out the wet part and repair. If it's not - I'd personally pull a section to see how far up the walls the water was pulled. Along with what others said - dehumidifiers and shop vacs.

    #22 1 year ago
    Quoted from tommyp:

    Hopefully otaku will jump in on this thread. From what I hear he's a pro at dealing with flooded basements.

    Quoted from oldtowner:

    Very sorry to hear this. I'd sacrifice the carpet rather than trying to save it

    No question....not with kids rolling around on the floor.

    #23 1 year ago

    Stop sopping, get a low cost wet dry vac and get every drop you can out fast. As others have said fans and a dehumidifier. Sorry this happened been there before myself. Horrible site!

    #24 1 year ago
    Quoted from Syco54645:

    i wouldnt rip up the carpet just yet.

    It is sewage. Rip out the carpet. And be prepared to cut out the paneling if it is wet.

    Did you call your insurance company? They should pay for professionals to do this for you, Service master can be there in an hour. Not cheap if it's not covered, but who wants to deal with this?

    #25 1 year ago

    I remember walking downstairs into my basement and taking that first step onto the carpet and the feeling of my sock getting saturated. It was the first time I had HOPED that one of my kids spilled something in the pinball room. I then optimistically took a second step and quickly realized I was going to have a long day.

    Pull it all out (carpet and pad) and don't take chances of missing something would be my advice.

    #26 1 year ago

    Sorry to hear this Ryan.

    #27 1 year ago
    Quoted from RyanClaytor:

    FWIW:
    » YouTube video

    That is not a flood. That is a little water. Get out some fans and a dehumidifier.
    Mine was 8" deep. Half of your carpet is dry.

    FB_IMG_1519159992940.jpg

    #28 1 year ago

    I think he said it is from his sump pump, so NOT sewage.

    That sure sucks, Ryan. But I think it could have been (a lot) worse.

    #29 1 year ago

    That stinks. It definitely happens to me too because I live on a hill and a ton of water will leak in through my sidewalk. Luckily, I can just flip my carpets up and put some fans and a couple dehumidifiers down there and they will do there job.

    #30 1 year ago

    Maybe not. Around here most "sump pumps" only remove ground water and storm water.
    A pump that moves sanitary sewage is usually referred to as an "ejector pump".
    Seems like Ryan has a "clean" water problem and not a "dirty" water problem.
    Anyway..........
    If it is sanitary sewage you're cleaning up, remove the carpet without question.
    If it is storm water or ground water, you could consider cleaning the carpet and saving it. But with young kids, probably replace it just to be safe.

    Sorry to see this Ryan.
    Batten down the hatches, more rain coming your way.

    #31 1 year ago

    Call your insurance co. Happened to me. They brought in HUGE dehumids, and fans, left them on for 3 days. This is after they pulled up carpet.
    This sucks, but it will clean up.

    #32 1 year ago

    Wet vacuum as much as you can. Or call a carpet cleaning company to come by an extract the excess water. Rent a carpet fan, or the carpet cleaners may have one you can use for a few days. The issue is if there is an underlay? If there is, it will have to be replaced, it is not worth cleaning. A carpet fan needs the snout of the fan shoved under the carpet, the door way access may work. The moving air will lift the carpet.

    Finally watched the video. That is a large area of wet carpet. Your going to have to move those machines out of the room, so the carpet can be lifted up. Or even removed to be cleaned, dried and reinstalled. I would call your insurance company, you will not want to have your kids playing on that carpet if a mold starts to grow in it.

    #33 1 year ago

    How so? This was a sump pump.

    #34 1 year ago

    What’s that fat pvc pipe that drains into the hole in the video?

    In my old house that was the drain collector for all the baths and kitchen = sewage. It is needed if the house is below grade if the sewage system or too low for the septic tank.

    Doesn’t look look like ground water piping. Where would the sewage go if it’s not in that closet?

    If I’m wrong that’s great.

    Should still call insurance.

    #35 1 year ago
    Quoted from Black_Knight:

    What’s that fat pvc pipe that drains into the hole in the video?

    It appears to be the pipe for radon mitigation. This is typically how they draw the radon out of homes in this part of the country.

    #36 1 year ago

    My Aunt had this problem, ironically on the day of my Uncle’s funeral. I turned off the water and we stopped up as much standing water as we could. She called her insurance company and they had a team of professionals out with their fans to dry things out. Make sure you explain the cause so they can get that fixed too!

    Sorry this happened to you, but all will be right as rain soon enough.

    #37 1 year ago

    Call either your insurance company or a clean up company. Sandy ripped the roof off my house and water came in. The insurance sent a clean up company with massive dehumidifiers. So powerful they sucked all the water out a toilet in less than 8 hours! In 3 days house was BONE dry. I live in a log home and even the damp interior walls were completely dry quickly. Don't mess with home style dehumidifiers. Carpet must go.

    #38 1 year ago
    Quoted from Black_Knight:

    What’s that fat pvc pipe that drains into the hole in the video?
    In my old house that was the drain collector for all the baths and kitchen = sewage. It is needed if the house is below grade if the sewage system or too low for the septic tank.
    Doesn’t look look like ground water piping. Where would the sewage go if it’s not in that closet?
    If I’m wrong that’s great.
    Should still call insurance.

    That would be his radon vent. See the balance meter there? That's so you can ensure the vent fan is running. That pipe is air.. not sewage.

    and yes, in some houses where the water drains are below the sewer exit, you use a pump to lift the water to the sewer... that doesn't appear to be the issue here.

    #39 1 year ago

    This is just some water... you are going to be fine.

    Vacuum up the water out of the carpet.. and run some fans and dehumidifer. You don't even need to pull the carpet... this is little stuff. People with leaking basement walls deal with way more water more regularly. My only question would be is what the subfloor is.. but it's probably just pad on concrete based on what we see there.

    Looks like flat carpet... just vacuum and keep the air moving. It will dry out and you'll be fine.

    And the point you pointed to in the video is the one way value. It keeps the water in the vertical pipe from draining back down into the pit. They do see quite a bit of pressure, so just make sure it and the clamps are mounted snugly. Sounds like in your case, it wasn't and worked its way free. The sump jumping when it shuts on/off usually make those pipes shake a good bit.

    #40 1 year ago

    Also, lift up out it the water or move any wood items or other items that can be damaged from the wet areas and dry out as best as you can You might consider putting the pinball feet up on coasters or something you have on hand to keep the leg levelers from rusting. Fortunately, Ringer appears to be high and dry.

    #41 1 year ago

    Ryan.. sorry, but to hear about this. We had similar issue in our basement a year or so ago. Some good advice in here, and as usual, some advice from people who have never experienced it and are wrong.

    Carpet will dry out and is made of plastic fibers typically, so not a huge problem but YMMV. However, if you have a pad underneath, it’s almost impossible to get that dried out because of the open cell foam construction.

    Doesn’t look like it got into your walls, so you should be ok here... but if it did, you can pull your base trim and drill 1” holes behind it that won’t show after you replace the trim. This will allow you to make sure insulation isn’t wet (if it is, you’ll probably have to pull drywall for bottom 10” and get wet insulation out of there). Our walls were dry, so no drywall pulled, just trim and a few holes.

    All of this was performed by a local Servicemaster company (at an exorbinant price I must add) and we only had to pay our insurance deductible.

    They did use 3 large commercial dehumidifiers for about 8 days, but our basement was much larger than what I saw in your video.

    Pad was replaced with new... original carpet stretched, and trim replaced. Good as new and you’d never know it happened.

    #42 1 year ago

    As soon as water is down:

    Get rid of all the carpet and padding, if you have standing water, you are not going to save it.

    Check if pilot light is out in water heater and furnace.

    If you have drywall walls, set your circular saw to 1/2" depth and cut the bottom 16" of drywall out and discard.

    Cut back bottom 16" of insulation, discard.

    Spray open stud bays with anti-mold.

    Run commercial dehumidifier for a few weeks.

    Install new insulation

    Cut drywall into 16" strips (3 per sheet). install and tape.

    Green drywall is mold resistant.

    -

    If you ever wanted more outlet plugs, now's the time to install them.....

    The old carpet tack strips will be rusty, but still good.

    Drywall-Removal-After-Water-Damage-Toronto-11 (resized).jpg

    #43 1 year ago

    Radon? Removed by a sump pump/ blower contraption?

    Not sure I'm supposed to feel good or bad about being wrong on that one.

    I'm glad I moved out of the midwest before they came up with that craziness.

    Should still call the insurance company ASAP.

    GL!

    #44 1 year ago
    Quoted from Black_Knight:

    Radon? Removed by a sump pump/ blower contraption?
    Not sure I'm supposed to feel good or bad about being wrong on that one.

    Radon Remediation System - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radon_mitigation

    You seal the foundation as much as possible.. and the underside (via the sump pit) is vented and runs a fan to help suck the air away from under the house. The fan is usually outside or in the attic.

    #45 1 year ago

    I am having the same problem right now. In the summertime I paid to have our driveway replaced and the tiles repaired next to the house. This morning we woke up to water and what a mess in the basement and my driveway is also covered in water supposed to be pushing water away from the house. Well I went into my normal mode and put down towels turned on the fans and the dehumidifier running. The only thing you can do.

    #46 1 year ago

    Guys are way over reacting... his carpet got WET - not standing under hurricane water.

    Literally, our house walls weeped for decades under heavy rain. Same story every storm... bust out the shop vacs.

    Our office under construction had the roof tarp fail.. literally 3" deep of rain water over several thousand sq feet over concrete floor+carpet. Everyone thought for sure they would have to tear all the construction up and redo it. Nope, they vented the drywall with 2" holes along the base, ran the blowers/heaters into them and vented the place, and then reset the carpet where needed. There was concrete floors and metal studs... but this flood here isn't even submerging the carpet.. and just under one wall.

    This guy had a small amount of water. His house probably got more wet when it was built than this. Check out the carpet, and dry out. Move on. It's not Chernanobyl

    #47 1 year ago
    Quoted from flynnibus:

    Guys are way over reacting... his carpet got WET - not standing under hurricane water.
    Literally, our house walls weeped for decades under heavy rain. Same story every storm... bust out the shop vacs.
    Our office under construction had the roof tarp fail.. literally 3" deep of rain water over several thousand sq feet over concrete floor+carpet. Everyone thought for sure they would have to tear all the construction up and redo it. Nope, they vented the drywall with 2" holes along the base, ran the blowers/heaters into them and vented the place, and then reset the carpet where needed. There was concrete floors and metal studs... but this flood here isn't even submerging the carpet.. and just under one wall.
    This guy had a small amount of water. His house probably got more wet when it was built than this. Check out the carpet, and dry out. Move on. It's not Chernanobyl

    Finally a voice of reason. People here are absolutely crazy. Rent a damn water extractor and run a good dehumidifier. The padding will dry out. Hell the walls probably have some water behind them a lot of times and he doesn't know.

    Op get a leak detector for that room.

    Is like people are giving shit advice to cost him money so he either sells games for cheap or can't afford to buy.

    #48 1 year ago

    I'm not sold on ripping up the carpet. Your sump pump SHOULD (if built correctly) have SURPRISINGLY clean water that was discharged out of it. Like this time of year, that's snow melt, etc. So it's already clean ground water, and then further filtered through drain tile/rock fill.... I would drink that straight up over Flint water any day.

    Seriously, fix the PVC (easy) and repair it. Curious how that happened to begin with. Ensure that the discharge line is using properly pressure-rated schedule pipe and that all joints are sealed properly with the CORRECT primer/glue.

    Next, get a dehumidifier and run it to the now-fixed drain so you're not emptying the bucket 1000 times.

    Get a water extractor from a rental place. Your carpet and pad will be fine.

    Mostly importantly, they sell alarms with a water sensor attached. Buy them!!

    #49 1 year ago

    Hey all,

    First off, thanks for all your responses. You were prompt, Pinside-y , and I've read each and every one of them. It's been a long day of moving machines, wet-vac-ing, and dehumidifying, but here's a Cliff Notes version of how it went:

    2018ClaytorianFlood (resized).jpg

    One of the main concerns I heard was about carpet padding, so I'll just mention briefly that I have none. Just flat carpet on concrete.

    Alright, a few responses, then bedtime for Bonzo...

    Quoted from SirScott:

    I think it could have been (a lot) worse.

    Despite being a huge pain of a day, I completely agree.

    Quoted from Pecos:

    My Aunt had this problem, ironically on the day of my Uncle’s funeral.

    Case in point.

    Quoted from MattElder:

    It appears to be the pipe for radon mitigation.

    Yurp.

    Quoted from flynnibus:

    just make sure it and the clamps are mounted snugly. Sounds like in your case, it wasn't and worked its way free. The sump jumping when it shuts on/off usually make those pipes shake a good bit.

    That explains it! I now have an annual programmed calendar reminder to get in that sump closet and tighten those clamps around the join of the PVC pipe.

    Quoted from Pecos:

    Fortunately, Ringer appears to be high and dry.

    Amen, brother.

    Quoted from attitude05:

    This morning he woke up to water and eat a mess in the basement and my driveway is also covered in water supposed to be pushing water weight. Well I went into my normal note and put down towels turn down the fans and healthy humidifier running. The only thing you can do.

    I've read this ^^^ three times over and I'm still not sure I understand. ...but, good luck?

    Quoted from wxforecaster:

    I would drink that straight up over Flint water any day.

    *LOL* A fine end to the madness of this day. Thanks, again, Pinside. This community never ceases to amaze me.

    Much appreciated,
    Ryan Claytor

    #50 1 year ago

    Bonzo...how can you sleep with the best thread ever to be read!

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/for-sale-sorcerer-6#post-4231725

    Just kidding...glad your basement is getting back in order! Goodnight

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