(Topic ID: 228586)

Bally Supersonic Blowing F2 at Startup


By GuiitarMan

8 months ago



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  • 11 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 8 months ago by BigAl56
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#1 8 months ago

I brought home a Bally Supersonic, my first pin, a few weeks back that would boot, but not flip or have any display. I have gotten everything working except for the displays so far. All displays have been dead since I received the game. I am a total novice at electronics, but am learning a lot as I go. I checked the test points on the display boards and I am getting correct measurements on TP1, but not getting any high voltage at all on the other TP. I checked fuse F2 and it was the only one blown so of course I replaced F2, booted her up, and in a magnificent, bright green flash I quickly blew the new F2.

The only thing I can tell visually (a novice eye of course) is that I have some corrosion on the BR3 rectifier board. (Pictures included) Would this be the probable cause of F2 blowing? What would be the best solution for a complete novice (replacing the board, sending it out for repair, etc)?

Thank you for your time and any suggestions/solutions you may have!

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#2 8 months ago

one of the diodes on the left of the rectifier board is most likely shorted. they are the small black things. there are four of them. put a meter on continuity and test each one. if you get continuity it is shorted.

#3 8 months ago
Quoted from Astill:

one of the diodes on the left of the rectifier board is most likely shorted. they are the small black things. there are four of them. put a meter on continuity and test each one. if you get continuity it is shorted.

I get continuity only on CR1. It has a little corrosion around it as well (as do many of the other solder points on the board).

What is my best course of action knowing I've never done board repair before?
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#4 8 months ago
Quoted from GuiitarMan:

I get continuity only on CR1. It has a little corrosion around it as well (as do many of the other solder points on the board).
What is my best course of action knowing I've never done board repair before?
[quoted image]

If CR1 shows full continuity, zero ohm, both ways you put the DMM leads on it it is dead and the reason the fuse is blowing. That diode had previously shorted and someone fixed it in a sloppy manor. Probably without taking the rectifier board out. Almost looks like the wrong kind of solder and/or flux was used.

Considering the shape of the fuse clips and the work at the high voltage diode bridge consider replacing the entire board instead of fixing that. Only issue is that still requires some soldering and board work because the transformer is hard attached to the rectifier board with soldered wires. Cut the wires off the original board one at at time so you don't get mixed up. Strip the end. Solder to the new board.

Perhaps you could send the entire transformer assembly somewhere to be rebuilt / rectifier board replaced. I am not sure if anyone provides that service tho. Heavy to ship but it might fit in a flat rate box.

#5 8 months ago

For the cost of the diode (1N4004) which are pennies in bulk or a buck at retail, cut that bad one out and tack solder a new one in its place. Your not operating it in a commercial environment so the only risk by not removing & replacing the board is it not as not vibration resistant as originally designed.
Heck, if you have a soldering iron and solder and want to tackle it yourself, I'll send you some diodes in an envelope. PM me with your address.

Before others say I'm endorsing a hack, this was a suggested repair at the Bally service schools. I did it all the time when I worked for a route operator. Keep the games earning and on to the next location with a coin jam....

#6 8 months ago

It's probably a bad diode and they are cheap to replace. If it were my game I would remove the board and properly replace all 4 diodes.

#7 8 months ago
Quoted from barakandl:

If CR1 shows full continuity, zero ohm, both ways you put the DMM leads on it it is dead and the reason the fuse is blowing. That diode had previously shorted and someone fixed it in a sloppy manor. Probably without taking the rectifier board out. Almost looks like the wrong kind of solder and/or flux was used.
Considering the shape of the fuse clips and the work at the high voltage diode bridge consider replacing the entire board instead of fixing that. Only issue is that still requires some soldering and board work because the transformer is hard attached to the rectifier board with soldered wires. Cut the wires off the original board one at at time so you don't get mixed up. Strip the end. Solder to the new board.
Perhaps you could send the entire transformer assembly somewhere to be rebuilt / rectifier board replaced. I am not sure if anyone provides that service tho. Heavy to ship but it might fit in a flat rate box.

I agree look how bad the fuse holders look as well.

#8 8 months ago
Quoted from BigAl56:

It's probably a bad diode and they are cheap to replace. If it were my game I would remove the board and properly replace all 4 diodes.

I agree with you Al. I said this as the OP mentioned he was a novice.

#9 8 months ago

Thanks for the help! I'm ordering some diodes today and will see what I can do. I haven't done any board work at all before so I think I will start by trying Mr.Bally's method before trying to pull the board out completely. I'll update once I can get it installed.

#10 8 months ago

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#11 8 months ago

Soldering and board repair are must-have skills for a wannabe pinball tech.
My recommendation for a newbie is buy a cadaver boards from ebay to practice on and watch some YouTube videos.

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