(Topic ID: 296272)

Bally Amigo weak right pinball flipper

By mathrocks

6 months ago


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  • Latest reply 5 months ago by mathrocks
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#1 6 months ago

I have a Bally Amigo pinball and the right flipper is weak. It stops when it hits the ball and sometimes does not open up all the way. I think it may be the EOS switch but I’m an amateur at this. I have some video of the switch. Only minimal sparking at the right switch compared to the left switch. The working, left switch produces a green spark and the right switch produces a minimal spark that is white. Would the best way to trouble shoot be to replace the right EOS?

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#2 6 months ago

Have you cleaned the EOS switches? Also inspect the right EOS switch contacts and see if it's pitted/uneven looking. If it is, replace it.

#3 6 months ago

Thanks! What is the best way to clean them? Would you physically remove the switch to clean it?

#4 6 months ago
Quoted from mathrocks:

Thanks! What is the best way to clean them? Would you physically remove the switch to clean it?

For most contacts on an EM, you want to use a very very light sandpaper/file/etc. I like using flexstone. No need to remove it from the game.

Since the flipper button and EOS switches have more current running through them and get used more heavily than the other switches, you can use something a little beefier like this Metal Contact File
http://www.pbresource.com/tools.html

If you're new to EMs I would read section 1, 2 and the relevant parts of section 3 on pinrepair's EM article:
http://www.pinrepair.com/em/index1.htm#top

#5 6 months ago

Definitely consider a full rebuild kit if they've never been rebuilt. Grime and worn plastic/metal parts on EMs can lead to all kinds of problems and sluggish gameplay
http://www.pbresource.com/rebuildkit.html#KT-BFLIP01

#6 6 months ago

Thanks! This is really helpful! My next question was going t be the best place to get the EOS switch but I can see that the kit you shared already has two of them in the kit. I don’t see any pitting or unusual build up on the EOS switch. Although one leg of the switch does move a little which could be causing it to not make good contact.

#7 6 months ago
Quoted from mathrocks:

Thanks! This is really helpful! My next question was going t be the best place to get the EOS switch but I can see that the kit you shared already has two of them in the kit. I don’t see any pitting or unusual build up on the EOS switch. Although one leg of the switch does move a little which could be causing it to not make good contact.

If the contacts are black, then that's the buildup that needs to be cleaned. They were originally shiny metal. What happens is when the two contacts move closer and closer together, right before they touch the electricity jumps from one contact to the next. This jump in electricity is that spark you were seeing. This jump creates the black soot, and on higher current contacts the jump can cause pitting. Since this is an EOS switch, it's normally closed, and the opening of the switch causes the jump in electricity. A loose switch can also cause the flipper to feel weak. Try tightening everything (the stack, the mounting plate, the coil brackets) and see if it helps. Any play in the metal plunger where the roll pin goes through is bad as well

#8 6 months ago

I tried tightening everything and it is still the same. I definitely think I’ll need to invest in the flipper rebuild kit. Can you see the top picture above where the EOS switch contains a blue, plastic/paper piece between the switch? It looks like one leg of the switch was originally too long and it was then cut or broken too short. So the blue plastic/paper piece is actually what the plunger hits to open the switch. I’m thinking part of the problem is that assembly.

#9 6 months ago
Quoted from mathrocks:

I tried tightening everything and it is still the same. I definitely think I’ll need to invest in the flipper rebuild kit. Can you see the top picture above where the EOS switch contains a blue, plastic/paper piece between the switch? It looks like one leg of the switch was originally too long and it was then cut or broken too short. So the blue plastic/paper piece is actually what the plunger hits to open the switch. I’m thinking part of the problem is that assembly.

That's called fish paper, and it's there to ensure the switches only touch at the contact points, and the arm which moves the switch doesn't get shorted. It's supposed to be there. Before you buy that flipper rebuild kit, I would read that pinrepair page and see if there's anything else you potentially need to buy along with it.

#10 6 months ago

Ah thanks for sharing that. Yes, I’ll read through the pin repair page and see what else I can glean from that. Thanks for all your help!

#11 6 months ago

The Bally flippers of that era have a plastic bushing that rides inside the coil sleeve to keep the plunger centered. From your picture, it looks like that clip is dislodged and out on the spring. I can’t really tell if that EOS switch is the right length or not. If the flipper isn’t put together correctly, it’s not going to work properly. If you’ve got one side that works well, and one side that doesn’t, compare the two with respect to how it feels mechanically, when the EOS switch opens, how the coil and switches are wired, and how much play there is in the linkage.

Dave

#12 6 months ago

Thanks! I did not even notice that clip but you were right and it was in the middle of the plunger. I pushed it up in the coil where I think it goes and it stabilized the plunger to feel like the other one. However, the flipper action still has the same issue. You are also right that the EOS switch was either cut or broken at the bottom. The fish paper is longer than the switch and goes past the broken point, which is not the case for the working side of the flipper. The working side does not have fish paper and the mechanism actually contacts the switch itself. I will keep looking into it to see if I notice any other differences also.

3 weeks later
#13 5 months ago

Dave, that suggestion about mechanically comparing both sides was great. The set screws on the plunger assembly were a little loose which was causing “play” and the flipper was weak. Looks like it was mechanical this time. But I cleaned the contacts and that is never a bad idea. Thanks everyone! Happy to say that this is resolved.

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