(Topic ID: 21584)

Are pins missing "current technology"?


By Wolfmarsh

7 years ago



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  • 59 posts
  • 30 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 7 years ago by HighProtein
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    #1 7 years ago

    Just curious what you guys think.

    Are pins missing current technologies, like Internet connectivity, or would they be better off without?

    Connectivity would lead to things like leaderboards, backups of settings, being able to roll out patches via the web, and integration to social networking.

    What got me started on this was thinking about LCD's in pins, and if that was really an advancement for pinball or actually something negative.

    #2 7 years ago

    If they add WiFi, and internet and everything else, they won't be serviceable.

    Right now I can field repair any pinball circuit board.

    If they start with all the micro surface mount stuff, it will be board swaps only = $$$$$$$$

    #3 7 years ago

    that's not the ONLY issue with pinball today, but that's part of it.

    DMD should have been replaced by LED version years ago.
    WIFI connection be neat? perhaps an RSS feed that auto-checks for updates? Neat, but overkill (and not worth the cost). How many updates does Stern really have, 2? 3?

    *update* Also let's not forget about pinball 2k, because there's no server (because there's no williams pinabll division) didn't they stop functioning, and you had to like create a fake intranet server to trick it in order for it to work?

    #4 7 years ago

    I play pinball so that I can give myself a break from the all powerful, all present internets. (I'm sorry internets!!!!)

    #5 7 years ago

    WOZ will have some of these features.

    #6 7 years ago

    WiFi and connectivity sounds like overkill to me. Every machine is set up differently and there is no point in having online scores and competitions, beyond what is already available on the interweb. There's also no way to regulate cheating for that matter. One thing I like about pinball is how it brings people together. Unlike most things today you really need to have a group of players on the same machine, likely accompanied by beers, smoke breaks, trash talking, bragging and bs'n.

    #7 7 years ago

    not for long

    #8 7 years ago

    PLC missing is huge. So is connectivity.

    Giddyup pinball manufacturers. Meet the technology or die.

    #9 7 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    If they add WiFi, and internet and everything else, they won't be serviceable.
    Right now I can field repair any pinball circuit board.
    If they start with all the micro surface mount stuff, it will be board swaps only = $$$$$$$$

    And I can field repair any WiFi controller and patch operating systems on the fly. That couldn't be further from reality. You may not be able to service it but others sure can. It will be just an additional skillset above and beyond the current pinball skillset.

    #10 7 years ago

    I can assure you the new stern board set has internet function.

    #11 7 years ago

    I for one, wish Stern (being the only pinball manufacturer that makes their own CPU's, everyone else is using P-roc systems) should at least create a pinball standard. When every start-up is using a standard platform, which is open source (and new animation, sounds, and rulesets can be created by the community), Stern is going to look even more behind the times. Maybe P-roc isn't as cost effective right now, with at least 4 new startups in the last year (plus the company itself becoming a startup), demand going up will only drive cost down. Hell, if Stern continues to release pins with unfinished code (and leave them semi-unfinished), that alone might drive people away.

    I don't know what wiring looks like on P-roc, and I've never opened a Stern to see how wiring goes, but on any pin I've opened there are 20 molex connectors. I would like to see one (maybe 2-3) connectors I need to disconnect from a playfield. I'd be much more apt to work on things (even do a teardown) if I didn't have to worry about everything getting plugged back in right.

    #12 7 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    I would like to see one (maybe 2-3) connectors I need to disconnect from a playfield. I'd be much more apt to work on things (even do a teardown) if I didn't have to worry about everything getting plugged back in right.

    Label the connectors and take pics. Practice taking them off and on. Be hands on and just take your time.
    Connectors are the Nature of the Beast. Harnesses and connectors are laid out for a reason.
    Stuffing 100 wires into one connector versus splitting them into multiple connectors makes things more manageable.

    The P-Roc stuff looks nice. Check out their system videos. You'll still have your I/O and will need to have various connectors as well. And the idea of open source is great .

    #13 7 years ago

    What about other technologies? There much better motors and switches out there. I would think you can do way cooler things with magnets now. How about an antigravity mini of? Motion and proximity sensors. Lots of cool things could be done with much more reliable and some cheaper parts. But no, why move into the next century. You can't tell me that the technology from the early 90's is still the best for our application. The only problem I see is the new stuff would be like working on the new cars. A mechanic with 40 years experience is obsolete working on new cars without all new training. It's a whole new skill set

    #14 7 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    I would like to see one (maybe 2-3) connectors I need to disconnect from a playfield.

    Electromechanical machines typically had from 2 to 4 connectors to unplug the playfield. Plus the fact that one person could easily lift the playfield out of the machine without getting a hernia.

    #15 7 years ago
    Quoted from pdman:

    Label the connectors and take pics. Practice taking them off and on

    Ok, how bout some labels from the factory then, or make it idiot proof (each molex connector has a different pin-out, so you CAN'T plug the wrong connector into the wrong socket). Being an engineer, and knowing issues with production assemblers getting it right, and service people getting it right, you pretty much HAVE to make it idiot proof unless you want a lot of field returns.

    #16 7 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    Ok, how bout some labels from the factory then, or make it idiot proof (each molex connector has a different pin-out, so you CAN'T plug the wrong connector into the wrong socket). Being an engineer, and knowing issues with production assemblers getting it right, and service people getting it right, you pretty much HAVE to make it idiot proof unless you want a lot of field returns.

    Why not just label them before unplugging them?

    #17 7 years ago

    Want "current technology"?

    I think the P3 is going to be exactly what the doctor ordered. LCD in the playfield. Ball-tracking ability. Internet connectivity. Downloadable content.

    http://www.pinballnews.com/games/p3/index.html

    Yeah, I'm totally drinking the Kool-Aid on this one.....

    Later,
    EV

    #18 7 years ago
    Quoted from the_pin_family:

    Why not just label them before unplugging them?

    I've never found a good way to do this, something that's massed produced from a factory would be more ideal. Sure I can put a label on the wiring, then leave a mess of adhesive residue. Not enough surface area on the molex connector. I can see labeling the CPU board (obviously enough surface area there). I suppose maybe a flag connector on a zip tie?

    Just sayin, look at any other industry, it's more obvious than just a bunch of generic molex connectors with common pinouts. On a computer, an IDE cable even has a "1" on pin one, and a notch so you can't plug it in backwards. Molex power connectors are keyed, and all run 12v, SATA connectors are polarized, CPU pinouts are polarized.

    #19 7 years ago
    Quoted from Pinchroma:

    And I can field repair any WiFi controller

    You are much better with a soldering iron than I.

    I'd need to be at my workbench with my hot air station to replace a TSOP.

    #20 7 years ago

    1. Invent flipper systems that do not wear out as fast.

    2. Invent rubber rings that do not wear out as fast.

    3. Invent switches that do not wear out as fast.

    4. Invent better attract and in-game information to help people get interested and to understand how to play the game.

    5. Invent games with increased difficulty, on the physical side, with progress. So new/novice players do not feel they're being ripped off.

    And for the US: 6. Invent $1, $2 and $5 coins.

    And that is what will benefit pinball in the wild.

    I do not like the LCD (I don't mind the technology, but the size) of WOZ. But, I am looking forward to see what it will offer in relation to my item no. 4.

    #21 7 years ago

    soren has good points, specially "4."
    There could be some cool new things which could be implemented to today´s pin. Lasers could be cool and add some new functions or at least look good.
    BUT, please let´s keep pinball´s physical nature. For example, I do not like RFM, that crt-monitor makes that more a videogame, it feel less pinball IMO.
    Some moving playfield parts maybe.. portion of playfield rises or lowers.

    #22 7 years ago

    In the end, does anyone really care how it's done, so long as the product is what you want? I couldn't care less if there is a p-roc, sam, wpc, pin2000 or anything else driving a new machine, only that it works well, and the PF play is what I want.

    The idea of an LCD sounds neat, but I barely look up anyway. Give me a good PF, with lots to do, great rules, and great lights and sounds, and I'm set.

    #23 7 years ago

    Wifi could enable a much more efficient pinball maintenance system that would automatically update a service company's database of issues on location that need to be checked out. Games that detect issues would auto send a service request to remote servicing companies.

    What they need to build into newer pinball machines are Zigbee networks and get rid of all the wiring for the sensors around the game. Every switch, opto, spinner, etc. should be transmitting wirelessly back to the processing boards. Would free up so much extra room and reduce some of the manufacturing costs. Might take some time for the sensor nodes to come down in price so that it's reasonable to do, but I don't see why this wouldn't be a better solution other than possibly debugging purposes.

    #24 7 years ago

    Lots of great answers.

    #25 7 years ago

    I personally would not want a pinball with internet. Benefits of internet might be:

    1) Updates. Not a big deal for me, doing it the current USB way is simple and straightforward.
    2) Leaderboards. Too easy to "cheat" the score (take the glass off) so they would become meaninless.
    3) Seeing "what your friends are playing". Don't care.
    4) Multiplayer. Obviously not applicable.
    5) Ability to have gameplay videos, etc displayed on the LCD, and have them updated from the internet, okay, that would be kind of cool.
    6) Ability to have ads pumped out by the manufacturer directly to your LCD. Nope, not interested.

    So I can think of one or two minor benefits, but nothing that interests me enough to want to pay more for that technology. And oh man, think of the troubleshooting threads that will start once these more advanced systems start going into pinball. It will go from "a switch isn't registering" to "my pinball machine can't talk through my firewall", or "the video on my LCD is all garbled/jerky". Gah.

    #26 7 years ago

    North Koreans h4x0red my pin!

    #27 7 years ago
    Quoted from EchoVictor:

    I think the P3 is going to be exactly what the doctor ordered. LCD in the playfield. Ball-tracking ability. Internet connectivity. Downloadable content.

    http://www.pinballnews.com/games/p3/index.html

    Yeah, I'm totally drinking the Kool-Aid on this one.....

    Me too. P3 is the most exciting thing to happen to pinball in a long time. I really hope these guys deliver the goods.

    Quoted from paul_8788:

    I personally would not want a pinball with internet. Benefits of internet might be:

    4) Multiplayer. Obviously not applicable.

    I wholeheartedly disagree. Online tournaments may not be practical for obvious reasons, but I see absolutely no reason why some form of head-to-head play couldn't be implemented. How cool would it be to play against one of your buddies who lives halfway around the world? It would add a whole new dimension to the playing experience. I can only imagine the cool stuff that someone like Keith would come up with given the technology to work with.

    #28 7 years ago
    Quoted from gweempose:

    I wholeheartedly disagree. Online tournaments may not be practical for obvious reasons, but I see absolutely no reason why some form of head-to-head play couldn't be implemented. How cool would it be to play against one of your buddies who lives halfway around the world? It would add a whole new dimension to the playing experience. I can only imagine the cool stuff that someone like Keith would come up with given the technology to work with.

    The only thing I can think of that would make it interesting for me is if a virtual pin table was constructed and displayed on the LCD, and every single ball movement was tracked so it was like you were "watching" the other person play. Just waiting for a "player finished" message and a score update would bore me to tears.

    #29 7 years ago
    Quoted from paul_8788:

    Just waiting for a "player finished" message and a score update would bore me to tears.

    You need to think outside the box. Imagine if the two of you were playing simultaneously, and things you did directly affected stuff on the other person's machine. For example, be the first to complete a bank of targets, and it locks off a portion of their playfield. Achieve a certain score, and the other person's flippers are reversed for a certain period of time. The possibilities are endless.

    #30 7 years ago
    Quoted from gweempose:

    You need to think outside the box. Imagine if the two of you were playing simultaneously, and things you did directly affected stuff on the other person's machine. For example, be the first to complete a bank of targets, and it locks off a portion of their playfield. Achieve a certain score, and the other person's flippers are reversed for a certain period of time. The possibilities are endless.

    Hmm. Never thought about one person's gameplay affecting someone elses. Not sure how fun something like that would be, I find I drain fast enough without help from others, but I agree there are possibilities there.

    #31 7 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    Just curious what you guys think.
    Are pins missing current technologies, like Internet connectivity, or would they be better off without?
    Connectivity would lead to things like leaderboards, backups of settings, being able to roll out patches via the web, and integration to social networking.
    What got me started on this was thinking about LCD's in pins, and if that was really an advancement for pinball or actually something negative.

    Pinball, as all other entertainment does, should be constantly innovating. We've been in a 20-year rut. I played back in high school then got back into it in my mid 30s. What did I miss that whole time? Very little.

    #32 7 years ago

    This is a great thread. Let me toss in my 2cents from a designer and mfg of electronics.

    There is a lot of technology available that I think could be used to lower the cost of NIB pinball machines, and make pinball more appealing to the operators.

    1. Get rid of the wiring harness and go with a serial bus. Use a car as an example. They link all of their subsystems through a very robust CAN bus network. A single CAN node can control as few as 1 or as many as 8 lights, motors, solenoids. You would need at least a 4 conductor cable run through the game to the various nodes (2 signal, +5 and GND) and maybe a 5th if you were doing solenoids (assuming feature lamps are LED). Stern claims they have run as much as a 1/4 mile of wire in a game.
    2. CAN can run up to 4MBits /sec. More than enough capability there, and you can have as many as 127 nodes.
    3. From a marketing perspective, let's say you have an internet/wifi connection to the game. A smart individual could come up with a marketing plan that would sell add space to display on the screen. The operator of a sports bar could sell advertising space to the local beer distributors that would only show up during attract mode. A wifi connection would allow the "distributor" to see how many times his adds ran and pay the operator a set amount per add. Same sports bar, maybe it is a local college sports paraphenalia store that wants to drum up some more business for things like hats, shirts, sports stuff. A wifi connection is required to make stuff like this happen.

    There are lots of ideas out there to bring Pinball into 21st technology, but it also requires money and those innovative people out there to make it happen.

    Brett

    #33 7 years ago
    Quoted from XPinPinball:

    This is a great thread. Let me toss in my 2cents from a designer and mfg of electronics.
    There is a lot of technology available that I think could be used to lower the cost of NIB pinball machines, and make pinball more appealing to the operators.
    1. Get rid of the wiring harness and go with a serial bus. Use a car as an example. They link all of their subsystems through a very robust CAN bus network. A single CAN node can control as few as 1 or as many as 8 lights, motors, solenoids. You would need at least a 4 conductor cable run through the game to the various nodes (2 signal, +5 and GND) and maybe a 5th if you were doing solenoids (assuming feature lamps are LED). Stern claims they have run as much as a 1/4 mile of wire in a game.
    2. CAN can run up to 4MBits /sec. More than enough capability there, and you can have as many as 127 nodes.
    3. From a marketing perspective, let's say you have an internet/wifi connection to the game. A smart individual could come up with a marketing plan that would sell add space to display on the screen. The operator of a sports bar could sell advertising space to the local beer distributors that would only show up during attract mode. A wifi connection would allow the "distributor" to see how many times his adds ran and pay the operator a set amount per add. Same sports bar, maybe it is a local college sports paraphenalia store that wants to drum up some more business for things like hats, shirts, sports stuff. A wifi connection is required to make stuff like this happen.
    There are lots of ideas out there to bring Pinball into 21st technology, but it also requires money and those innovative people out there to make it happen.
    Brett

    The Marsaplay game with the LCD showed a Heinekin ad in one of the promo videos.

    I'm not sure if initially or longterm that advertising on pinball machines is a sustainable business model given pinball's presence.

    #34 7 years ago

    Great points XPin.

    It's been my point all the way, that the LCD on the JJP platform does not suit the pinball machine well. It's too dominating to the playfield/lights. Like serving fine wine at KFC

    But it will have an appeal on operated games to attract players, educate game objectives and run advertisement. Which hopefully will make games in the wild more attractive for locations and operators.

    PCB's with surface mounted LED's, run by a serial bus carring both power and signal, is the way to go. There will be developement cost and perhaps higher cost of manifactoring parts (though the traditional wiring harness looks labour intensive). But, ease of assembly and maintainance. The benefit of LED's, like em or not, is obvious for an operated game powered on for 100's of hours a week.

    Don't know if it will work for solenoids. But you could still simplify wiring by having more smaller and decentralised driver boards mounted underside the playfield. Boards are controlled in serial from from the CPU in the backbox and having power directly from the PSU in cabinet.

    Oh wait, why not have all boards in the cabinet. Could simplify and cost reduce the backbox.

    And while we're at it. Imagine a bi-directional bus also going to PCB's with proximity switches rather then micro switches.

    I believe Marsaplay are there already. However that game seems a lot simpler.

    #35 7 years ago

    Move from the micro switch to a proxy sensor, which removes the penetrations through the playfield.

    And for the difficulty side of things could be fun that the playfield slowly increases in angle using a linear actuator - maybe 5 - 10 degrees.

    #36 7 years ago
    Quoted from soren:

    Don't know if it will work for solenoids. But you could still simplify wiring by having more smaller and decentralised driver boards mounted underside the playfield. Boards are controlled in serial from from the CPU in the backbox and having power directly from the PSU in cabinet.

    This is exactly what we've done with the P-ROC and PDBs. They've been available for almost a year now for anybody who wants to use them to control their games, and we're using them in the control system for the P3.

    For a number of reasons we believe CAN is not the best choice for such a control system; so we're using RS-485 (the physical layer used in CAN) with a very simple custom protocol.

    See the driver board demo at http://pinballcontrollers.com/index.php/component/content/article/34/92 (FF to approx. 2:50).

    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    #37 7 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    You are much better with a soldering iron than I.
    I'd need to be at my workbench with my hot air station to replace a TSOP.

    You are assuming you would bother repairing the one
    On the motherboard

    #38 7 years ago
    Quoted from gweempose:

    You need to think outside the box. Imagine if the two of you were playing simultaneously, and things you did directly affected stuff on the other person's machine. For example, be the first to complete a bank of targets, and it locks off a portion of their playfield. Achieve a certain score, and the other person's flippers are reversed for a certain period of time. The possibilities are endless.

    Wow - Awesome ideas!!!! Playing against each other is awesome - Don't forget a randomized Pin-Golf Style online tournament. Imagine being in a 20 person tourney from your house at any given time! You wouldn't have to wait for the other people either.

    #39 7 years ago

    I think it would be pretty easy to ferret out cheaters in an online leaderboard, especially if the rest of the pin is integrated.

    It's not that hard to determine "impossible" switch sequences, or even switch sequences that just don't make logical sense, like all of the targets for a certain mode being hit, in order, without the flippers being hit (as a very elementary example).

    As an even simpler deterrent and additional feature set, you could always add a webcam covering the playfield. Your "scoring" game is recorded and uploaded along side your score. Want to see how someone got that high score? Watch the replay of their game and see what tricks they use. Want to remember the light show that happened when you hit wizard mode? Just archive the replay so you can see it whenever you want.

    What about making the platform open, so people could build toolsets and catalog knowledge around one strong platform, and even use it to their benefit in older games through emulation.

    #40 7 years ago

    i always wanted a way to keep track of my goals and have the machine make the difficulty settings for me. it would be like the Rush 2049, Fast and the Furious, Super Bikes, style where you would have a keypad to enter your identifying code and it would then keep track of you and how you were doing. if the machine had internet capabilities then i could go from place to place (whether that be at my house, a friends house, Pinball Hall of Fame in Vegas, or just down to the local pub and my game stats would be there. It could be used to then build up a list of accomplishments or goals.

    Lets say you were playing Lord of the Rings (i use this because i have a decent understanding of the rules and layout), if your stats were kept in some server somewhere then you could have different modes built into the game for more experienced players (yes i know, this games kills even the experienced players and doesn't need anymore modes). If you completed the Fellowship in one round then you could open a different mystery, or if you destroyed the ring 10 times in a month then you get an extra ball on your 10th destruction.

    Something like this has been missing i believe for a while now. If my phone can tell where i am and suggest a place to eat based upon my location then why can't a pinball remember who i am and adjust the game according to my style and level of skill. This way my 8 year old cousin and i could play the same game and both have a good time doing it.

    #41 7 years ago
    Quoted from KingPinGames:

    I always wanted a way to keep track of my goals and have the machine make the difficulty settings for me ... where you would have a keypad to enter your identifying code and it would then keep track of you and how you were doing. If the machine had internet capabilities, then I could go from place to place ... and my game stats would be there. It could be used to then build up a list of accomplishments or goals.

    This is exactly what is being done with the more advanced slot machines these days. It's really very cool.

    #42 7 years ago
    Quoted from Pinchroma:

    You are assuming you would bother repairing the one
    On the motherboard

    Sure, think of how many 30 year old +++ games I repair.

    Techs in the future won't want to hear that Cockfight Pinball Company made it a CPU board swap only repair. That would suck because Cockfight is long out of business, and near the end that CPU board was selling for $900. They used a 7 layer circuit board to save some money and shrink the size of the board, but that 7 layer board is impossible to field repair.

    #43 7 years ago

    Just to toss my 2 cents in, I actually think the design would benefit from vid's "serviceable" line of thinking.

    People who aren't electrical engineers should be able to build it, fix it, and modify it. Otherwise, "open" just means "open to people who could do this themselves anyway".

    #44 7 years ago
    Quoted from KingPinGames:

    i always wanted a way to keep track of my goals and have the machine make the difficulty settings for me. it would be like the Rush 2049, Fast and the Furious, Super Bikes, style where you would have a keypad to enter your identifying code and it would then keep track of you and how you were doing. if the machine had internet capabilities then i could go from place to place (whether that be at my house, a friends house, Pinball Hall of Fame in Vegas, or just down to the local pub and my game stats would be there. It could be used to then build up a list of accomplishments or goals.
    Lets say you were playing Lord of the Rings (i use this because i have a decent understanding of the rules and layout), if your stats were kept in some server somewhere then you could have different modes built into the game for more experienced players (yes i know, this games kills even the experienced players and doesn't need anymore modes). If you completed the Fellowship in one round then you could open a different mystery, or if you destroyed the ring 10 times in a month then you get an extra ball on your 10th destruction.
    Something like this has been missing i believe for a while now. If my phone can tell where i am and suggest a place to eat based upon my location then why can't a pinball remember who i am and adjust the game according to my style and level of skill. This way my 8 year old cousin and i could play the same game and both have a good time doing it.

    They're doing that with the InitialD games. You get a little card with your info on it and you can use it in other games. Not quite the same but it does open the door to a similar suite of features.

    #45 7 years ago

    I would also like an optional better diagnostics screen/input. diagnostics have progressively gotten better (more organized, more pixels which means more text characters instead of abbreviations and sometimes just numbers representing menu modes), but it could still get better. Even if the player only sees the standard DMD screen, I would like to be able to plug a smartphone or an ipad, and have a full screen clickable menu. Perhaps even a search screen [tell me if you detect any errors] or [go into solenoid test mode].

    #46 7 years ago

    Online scores are nice but pinball very's alot from machine to machine.

    and there are easy to hard settings that are not in the menus like moving posts or the table slope.

    Online will need to be locked down so hackers can't get in. And that can very from stuff like getting some free plays to putting up X rated ad's / other stuff to hacking a CC reader to maybe over driving a solenoid.

    Now local hooks up a laptop for diagnostics sounds cool and you have to take the cash out as well.

    To bad $1 coins are not big in the USA.

    #47 7 years ago
    Quoted from gstellenberg:

    For a number of reasons we believe CAN is not the best choice for such a control system; so we're using RS-485 (the physical layer used in CAN) with a very simple custom protocol.

    Gerry,

    Excellent point. I was thinking CAN primarily because of a car analogy. RS-485 with a custom protocol is just as straight forward. I have been following your work and I am very impressed with your accomplishments. I think the key to making a new pinball architecture successful is the decentralization of drivers. Smaller, localized solenoid driver boards and lamp drivers addressable by the CPU is key. The mindset has always been the more wires and fewer PCBs the simpler it is. That just is not the case. If just one solenoid drive transistor goes up in smoke, you have to take out that driver board and repair the damage and pray it didn't take out the pre-driver and logic on the way down. Localized drivers under the playfield would probably not impact the other drivers and be a lot easier to repair/replace. Just think, if there was a wifi connection it could contact the operator and say it needs a service call and what actually failed.

    XPin

    #48 7 years ago
    Quoted from gstellenberg:

    This is exactly what we've done with the P-ROC and PDBs. They've been available for almost a year now for anybody who wants to use them to control their games, and we're using them in the control system for the P3.
    For a number of reasons we believe CAN is not the best choice for such a control system; so we're using RS-485 (the physical layer used in CAN) with a very simple custom protocol.
    See the driver board demo at http://pinballcontrollers.com/index.php/component/content/article/34/92 (FF to approx. 2:50).
    - Gerry
    http://www.multimorphic.com

    This is awesome! Exactly the way to do it.

    Two questions. Does the matrix driver support intensity levels on individual LED's (for fade out effect)? I don't really know if you can "pulse" your way to such a result on LED's without flickering.

    Do you make brackets for mounting driver boards perpendicular to playfield? Similar to the optic switch interface boards. Perhaps also some plastic shielding would be wise.

    #49 7 years ago
    Quoted from soren:

    Does the matrix driver support intensity levels on individual LED's (for fade out effect)? I don't really know if you can "pulse" your way to such a result on LED's without flickering.

    Yes, all of our drivers, matrix included, can be duty cycle controlled. We also just announced our forthcoming led driver board, which supports 256 intensity levels per LED (16M colors for RGB LEDs) with auto-fading.

    Quoted from soren:

    Do you make brackets for mounting driver boards perpendicular to playfield? Similar to the optic switch interface boards. Perhaps also some plastic shielding would be wise.

    We don't supply mounting hardware other than the mounting plates for the P-ROC that make it compatible with existing driver board footprints. Making a perpendicular mount bracket is relatively easy to do.

    - Gerry

    #50 7 years ago
    Quoted from XPinPinball:

    Gerry,
    The mindset has always been the more wires and fewer PCBs the simpler it is. That just is not the case. If just one solenoid drive transistor goes up in smoke, you have to take out that driver board and repair the damage and pray it didn't take out the pre-driver and logic on the way down. Localized drivers under the playfield would probably not impact the other drivers and be a lot easier to repair/replace. XPin

    Just wanted to say this is the #1 thing I would like to see and a great idea.

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    $ 7,499.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    $ 9.95
    Apparel - Unisex
    Pinball Wheezer
    $ 159.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 26.95
    Playfield - Protection
    ULEKstore
    $ 7,199.00
    Pinball Machine
    Operation Pinball
    € 80.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    YOYOKOPTER MODS
    $ 131.00
    Cabinet Parts
    Tilted Pinball
    $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    $ 29.95
    Gameroom - Decorations
    Pinball Photos
    $ 49.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 42.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 99.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 18.99
    Playfield - Protection
    PinShield
    From: $ 5,999.00
    Pinball Machine
    Great American Pinball
    $ 28.00
    Playfield - Other
    Pin Monk
    From: $ 19.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 5.00
    Playfield - Decals
    Doc's Pinball Shop
    $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 74.00
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Id Rather Play Pinball
    $ 126.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    £ 49.00
    Playfield - Other
    PinballToys
    $ 1,000.00
    Playfields
    Pinball Playfields
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