(Topic ID: 256724)

Applying front of cabinet decal


By Blackbeard

9 days ago



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  • 89 posts
  • 18 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 32 minutes ago by Blackbeard
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    There are 89 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 9 days ago

    I’m in the midst of a bad cats cab redecal.

    I have seen videos and read threads on doing the front coin door area decal.

    Some mentioned cutting a piece of wood to fit the coin door opening so when You lay the decal it doesn’t flex in the center as much Causing issues to the surrounding parts. However I don’t think I have the ability to make that piece of wood happen.

    I was thinking of cutting out the center of the decal slightly smaller than the opening hoping the prevents the decal from flexing during installation.

    Anyone with any ideas?

    #2 9 days ago

    Some people use high density foam
    (insulation board) as the filler instead of wood.

    For me I just cut slot on the inside of the coin door opening along the edge of the decal and either tape or clamp it to the cabinet. I apply one half then the other. Never had an issue...

    #3 9 days ago

    I’ve never had issues with the decal flexing. I don’t use anything to fill the void.

    #4 9 days ago

    Thanks guys. This is my first time redecaling a cabinet.

    I see the little hashmarks on the decals. How do you line those up?

    #5 9 days ago

    The intent of those is to use them as alignment. They should be lined up with the edges of the cabinet ...but they are not always perfect. There is always a bit of judgement involved. Start with the hash marks and see if your decal appears to be aligned right (on all sides and the coin door opening). Meaning ... after you trim it will it be straight and completely covering the face on all sides?

    If you spend a lot of time in the alignment step you are doing it right... Especially if it’s your first time. Just double, triple, quadruple check it. You got one shot at it.

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    #6 8 days ago

    Thank you ricochet for the amazing instructional.

    So far I have one side with the decal removed. Then sand...then filler... then sand etc

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    #7 8 days ago

    Yeah sand! Don’t use anything lower than 80 grit.

    80 (get the goo off)
    120 (clean off any remains of goo)
    220 (finish sand)

    You can really feel and tell if you’ve done it right. You will see little balls of debris when you are stripping that goo ... once you’ve gotten through it you will start producing dust. Look at it under light and literally feel it to see if you’ve gotten it all. It all has to come off.

    #8 8 days ago

    I’m
    Going to use some goof off for the sticky residue in there too.

    Quite a rewarding process.

    #9 8 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    I’m
    Going to use some goof off for the sticky residue in there too.
    Quite a rewarding process.

    There are few ways to deal with it. I prefer to not use anything that would penetrate the wood. Just a preference.

    #10 8 days ago

    I get that. And it makes sense for stickablilty of the decals I’m guessing?

    There’s a good video by Tattyadams and how he does his Indy on YouTube. You’ve likely seen it. I see he didn’t really prime the wood. But did apply quite a bit of filler to most of the cabinet sides.

    I may spray a light coat of some rustoleum primer/paint prior to decals.

    #11 8 days ago

    Use rapid tac to install decals the wet way, you can reset it and move the decal around without stress

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    #13 8 days ago

    The wet method freaks me out a bit for some reason. I do need to explore it a bit more.

    #14 8 days ago

    Chosen: I see you didn’t really prime the cabinet either prior to installation. Is that the norm?

    #15 8 days ago

    I always use the dry way it's one time thing but seems too work the best not a fan of the wet one

    #16 8 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    I’m
    Going to use some goof off for the sticky residue in there too.
    Quite a rewarding process.

    Goof off softens up the glue, then you can’t sand.

    You could use citristrip... paint it on, let sit for 20 minutes, then use a putty knife to scrape off the loose residue, clean off the rest of the sticky residue with a rag...

    Then let dry, then use bondo filler, let dry, then do the sanding process.

    If you just start off sanding with nothing to loosen the goo, you will go through a lot of frustration and sanding pads.

    By all means use a respirator

    #17 8 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    Chosen: I see you didn’t really prime the cabinet either prior to installation. Is that the norm?

    never thought there was a need to prime with decals, only prime with painting art back on to cabinet. If any paint is used on the cab, just sand smooth; even if only painting the edges of the cabinet

    #18 8 days ago
    Quoted from Williampinball:

    I always use the dry way it's one time thing but seems too work the best not a fan of the wet one

    I’ve done both , the wet method is only good in my experience with rapid tac, and really good for the inexperienced, first timers, or someone needing a redoable situation

    #19 8 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    The wet method freaks me out a bit for some reason. I do need to explore it a bit more.

    Rapid tac won’t penetrate the wood the way water does, it also doesn’t break down the glue on the decal... you just squeegee out the rapid tac. The rest dries out with a smooth finish ...

    I still prefer dry method because there’s no waiting to dry.

    #20 8 days ago

    This is a good watch

    #21 8 days ago

    I am just finishing up the 1st of 2 of my NBA Fastbreaks.... Orbital Sander only, no chemicals... then sand, fill, sand, fill, about a billion times to get it smooth. The prep to the cabinet is key....

    I only prepaint edges and anything exposed... Dry application only.
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    #22 8 days ago

    Looks great Ralph

    Also thanks for sharing the video. It’s really not that bad of a process just time consuming.

    #23 8 days ago

    Ralph did you just remove the back metal backing with the boards on it for the back box?

    #24 8 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    Ralph did you just remove the back metal backing with the boards on it for the back box?

    All hardware came out, including the metal panel..... Anything that could get tumbled, got tumbled. Everything else, sanded or polished.

    #25 8 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    It’s really not that bad of a process just time consuming

    Agreed.... Very time consuming. The edges are super important though, and need to be nice and sharp. You can really tell the difference on the cabinet corners where the decals meet.

    #26 8 days ago

    I've done about 5 cabinets. Most recently Taxi. I use the wet method and have been real happy with it.

    A few things I'd suggest:

    I use the plastic squeegees from Tap Plastic (a little larger than a credit card). I cut the square edges round w scissors. Those square edges can and will scratch most shiny / glossy artwork.

    In addition, I put on a soft edge on the squeegee, like he did on video of post #12. Note: he did the bottom half of front with protected felt, then had the squeegee upside down for the top half. You can even hear the difference in his application. This proection can be done with the sticky felt (like his in the vid.), soft side of velcro or the felt material used to protect the inside of pin cabinet's painted or decaled inside art.

    I recommend cleaning both the cabinet and the paper side of the artwork. Paper side of decal has dust and lint on it that will land on your smooth cabinet and look like pimples when you're done.

    I use the filler in the coin door, I made with MDF. This allows the artwork something to rest on and doesn't pull the thinner cabinet edges, especially top of coin door opening.

    I use an exacto pen knife blade for trim. I find I can easily press the blade hard and flat against cabinet for a clean straight cut.

    I've seen air bubbles in both dry & wet method. I use a heat gun (not hair blow dryer) on a low setting, to heat the artwork. Most of the time it will shrink bubbles. My Taxi even started to get slight new bubbles with the heat, but they all went away The other times it will soften bubble and allow you to take a pin to pop and massage air out. I have removed these bubbles 1-2 days later, after it has dried and settled down.

    I'd recommend doing the smaller panels first (the head sides). Then depending on your artwork, the front next and the cabinet sides last. The front before the sides, because many will need to marry the side's art to the front. It's critical the front be done first for that reason (especially Indiana Jones)

    I was very nervousness on my first cab... but it went well. Anyone have any other tips to add? I'm going to be doing my DINER next, then Bad Cats.

    Thanks
    Kerry

    #27 8 days ago
    Quoted from Kerry_Richard:

    I've done about 5 cabinets. Most recently Taxi. I use the wet method and have been real happy with it.
    A few things I'd suggest:
    I use the plastic squeegees from Tap Plastic (a little larger than a credit card). I cut the square edges round w scissors. Those square edges can and will scratch most shiny / glossy artwork.
    In addition, I put on a soft edge on the squeegee, like he did on video of post #12. Note: he did the bottom half of front with protected felt, then had the squeegee upside down for the top half. You can even hear the difference in his application. This proection can be done with the sticky felt (like his in the vid.), soft side of velcro or the felt material used to protect the inside of pin cabinet's painted or decaled inside art.
    I recommend cleaning both the cabinet and the paper side of the artwork. Paper side of decal has dust and lint on it that will land on your smooth cabinet and look like pimples when you're done.
    I use the filler in the coin door, I made with MDF. This allows the artwork something to rest on and doesn't pull the thinner cabinet edges, especially top of coin door opening.
    I use an exacto pen knife blade for trim. I find I can easily press the blade hard and flat against cabinet for a clean straight cut.
    I've seen air bubbles in both dry & wet method. I use a heat gun (not hair blow dryer) on a low setting, to heat the artwork. Most of the time it will shrink bubbles. My Taxi even started to get slight new bubbles with the heat, but they all went away The other times it will soften bubble and allow you to take a pin to pop and massage air out. I have removed these bubbles 1-2 days later, after it has dried and settled down.
    I'd recommend doing the smaller panels first (the head sides). Then depending on your artwork, the front next and the cabinet sides last. The front before the sides, because many will need to marry the side's art to the front. It's critical the front be done first for that reason (especially Indiana Jones)
    I was very nervousness on my first cab... but it went well. Anyone have any other tips to add? I'm going to be doing my DINER next, then Bad Cats.
    Thanks
    Kerry

    Great list... a couple I would add... always use a fresh razor edge... blades are cheap, don’t cheap out.

    Corners- I use a straight edge and then hold my blade at a 45 degree angle inward during the cut... this will hide a lot of the white decal edge. After the cut, you can use a black paint pen along the edge to hide all of the decal.

    Cabinet standoffs like Stern uses are a must.

    More progress on the Fastbreak tonight...

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    #28 8 days ago

    I painted the whole thing, then used rapid tac. If I hadn't used it, it would have gone south. Realized after placing half of the side decal that it was misaligned, and I was able to peel it back off and do it over. Yes, my heart was beating out of my chest, but it worked

    #29 8 days ago

    If it were me... using rapid tac, I would make sure it’s entirely painted. I’d prime the whole thing and then paint black along the edges.

    I’ve found that putting the first coat of primer down will sometimes reveal finish spots that were missed and any corner problems you may have missed. It can be tough to see everything that needs to be corrected on a bare wood surface.

    #30 8 days ago
    Quoted from ralphwiggum:

    Great list... a couple I would add... always use a fresh razor edge... blades are cheap, don’t cheap out.
    Corners- I use a straight edge and then hold my blade at a 45 degree angle inward during the cut... this will hide a lot of the white decal edge. After the cut, you can use a black paint pen along the edge to hide all of the decal.
    Cabinet standoffs like Stern uses are a must.
    More progress on the Fastbreak tonight...[quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

    Looks good. I am doing an NBAFB this winter.

    #31 8 days ago
    Quoted from Ricochet:

    found that putting the first coat of primer down will sometimes reveal finish spots that were missed

    One of the main reasons I may give a light coat of a primer.

    Tattyadam's youtube video shows him pretty much puttying the whole side(s) of the cabinet with a large scrapper tool. That way, most tiny imperfections are filled.

    #32 8 days ago

    You might want to take a look at the HEP thread. He doesn't use a blade, but rather sands the edges.

    I want to try that method, but I don't have any re-decals in the pipe.

    Good luck on the decal!

    #33 7 days ago
    Quoted from Lamprey:

    You might want to take a look at the HEP thread. He doesn't use a blade, but rather sands the edges.
    I want to try that method, but I don't have any re-decals in the pipe.
    Good luck on the decal!

    Yes I seen that too sand the edge and use a paint pen after you sand I tryed it on The restore I am doing now and works very very well looks great I would say for sure too do that .

    #34 7 days ago

    So I’ve been using goof off on the sticky decal residue. I basically puddle it up on the cab, let it sit, Then scrape it off. However it Seems to be a never ending job.

    The glue just keeps coming
    Off it seems. Does anybody have any hints? Or do you get to a point where are you call it good and just sand over it?

    #35 7 days ago

    Hello Blackbeard! I did a backbox restore on a Funhouse. I agree with the people recommending the wet method, but I had an important learning experience wit using rapid tac/wet method - Wait to cut the decal edges until after it dries. I found it really difficult (even with a sharp blade) to cut a perfect straight line when it was still wet from rapidtack. This was because the edge was prone to lifting a little while I was trying to cut it. If you get it down clean with the squeegee with no bubbles or issues, walk away for a few hours, let it set up, then cut the edges.

    Or just do the dry method. But I was very intimidated by this and wanted the margin of error that the wet method offers.

    I also strongly recommend priming it before hand and using 320 grit to sand down the primer. then use a tac cloth to pick up any sanding debris. It created a really perfect clean flat surface for the decal.

    #36 5 days ago
    Quoted from Elicash:

    Hello Blackbeard! I did a backbox restore on a Funhouse. I agree with the people recommending the wet method, but I had an important learning experience wit using rapid tac/wet method - Wait to cut the decal edges until after it dries. I found it really difficult (even with a sharp blade) to cut a perfect straight line when it was still wet from rapidtack. This was because the edge was prone to lifting a little while I was trying to cut it. If you get it down clean with the squeegee with no bubbles or issues, walk away for a few hours, let it set up, then cut the edges.
    Or just do the dry method. But I was very intimidated by this and wanted the margin of error that the wet method offers.
    I also strongly recommend priming it before hand and using 320 grit to sand down the primer. then use a tac cloth to pick up any sanding debris. It created a really perfect clean flat surface for the decal.

    Thanks

    What did you use for a primer? I think my options are limited to rattle cans. Was thinking Rustoleum paint and prime.

    #37 5 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    rattle cans. Was thinking Rustoleum paint and prime.

    IMO... this should be a good product. I'd do several good coats, then lightly wet sand in between w 400 grit, for smooth finish. Then paint all corners, to seal the deal!

    #38 5 days ago
    Quoted from Kerry_Richard:

    IMO... this should be a good product. I'd do several good coats, then lightly wet sand in between w 400 grit, for smooth finish. Then paint all corners, to seal the deal!

    Thanks Kerry

    Excuse my ignorance, but what's wet sand? I only have a palm sander I've been using.

    #39 5 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    Thanks Kerry
    Excuse my ignorance, but what's wet sand? I only have a palm sander I've been using.

    Its the process of sanding with water. You will want a sanding block and real fine sand paper. Apply a bit of water, and sand "wet" for a super smooth finish.

    #40 5 days ago
    Quoted from ralphwiggum:

    Its the process of sanding with water. You will want a sanding block and real fine sand paper. Apply a bit of water, and sand "wet" for a super smooth finish.

    interesting. Something like a spray mister bottle of water?

    #41 5 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    interesting. Something like a spray mister bottle of water?

    Yep, exactly.... It is used to knock down any slight imperfections like scratching from dry sanding. I personally don't wet sand my cabinets, but it is all personal preference.

    #42 5 days ago

    My backbox has some dinged up corners. Is really bondo the stuff to use here? I've never used it prior.

    I'd love to get away with something like wood filler for corners, as they're really not bad.

    #43 5 days ago
    Quoted from Lermods:

    I’ve never had issues with the decal flexing. I don’t use anything to fill the void.

    same here, I always apply wet and let dry and then cut the opening out the next day.

    #44 5 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    My backbox has some dinged up corners. Is really bondo the stuff to use here? I've never used it prior.
    I'd love to get away with something like wood filler for corners, as they're really not bad.

    I use bondo for any corners that are going to be exposed (like where they will physically be contacted- especially on the bottom of the corners), and I also use bondo for larger imperfections. For minor imperfections and corners, I use wood filler that is extra durable, doesn't shrink, is sandable, and has wood fiber premixed into it. It dries hard and is very workable. The NBA Fastbreak I showed in the pictures is a combo of wood filler and bondo based on location of damage. I will see if I can dig up some before pictures....

    #45 5 days ago
    Quoted from Blackbeard:

    interesting. Something like a spray mister bottle of water?

    There are a ton of YouTube vids of wet sanding, especially on cars for fine finish spray painting.

    I use a plastic Tupperware square bin ~10" x 10" with water in it. I dip (clean) my rubber sanding block often. It cleans the paint dust out, and makes your paper almost new again (ultimately it does wear out). I've usually put a very light squirt of Dawn dish soap in to help with cleaning and smoothness of the sanding strokes.

    #46 4 days ago
    Quoted from Kerry_Richard:

    There are a ton of YouTube vids of wet sanding, especially on cars for fine finish spray painting.
    I use a plastic Tupperware square bin ~10" x 10" with water in it. I dip (clean) my rubber sanding block often. It cleans the paint dust out, and makes your paper almost new again (ultimately it does wear out). I've usually put a very light squirt of Dawn dish soap in to help with cleaning and smoothness of the sanding strokes.

    Will this work on scratched lockdown bars? I've been afraid to try.

    #47 4 days ago
    Quoted from yzfguy:

    Will this work on scratched lockdown bars? I've been afraid to try.

    You could wet sand a stainless steel lockdown bar, stay with the direction of the grain, i would go 400-600 grit. There also are polishing compounds that would do the same. Depending on how well you do it one could essentially turn it into a mirrored finish.

    #48 4 days ago
    Quoted from yzfguy:

    Will this work on scratched lockdown bars? I've been afraid to try.

    If you want to regrain a lockdown bar, grab these- amazon.com link »

    Stay the same direction as the grain, you will be done in no time....

    #49 4 days ago
    Quoted from ralphwiggum:

    If you want to regrain a lockdown bar, grab these- amazon.com link »
    Stay the same direction as the grain, you will be done in no time....

    Cool, thanks! And wet sand with those? I have a whirlwind lockdown bar I'd like to make nice, but I have a spare I plan to practice on.

    #50 4 days ago
    Quoted from yzfguy:

    Will this work on scratched lockdown bars? I've been afraid to try.

    Yes. You can make it look just as good as chrome plating and in some ways better as chrome work will eventually wear away on the edges due to the sweat/friction from your hands.

    Quoted from PinRob:

    Depending on how well you do it one could essentially turn it into a mirrored finish.

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