(Topic ID: 295750)

Anyone else get sweaty palms when the storms come?

By Chisox

4 months ago


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  • Latest reply 3 months ago by mbwalker
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    #1 4 months ago

    Sitting here in my basement in the middle of a three day midwest thunderstorm with my pins and other electronics and praying that sump pump keeps up is something that’s getting old.

    I have a raised ranch so my basement is super wide and downhill so I get a lot of water that gets pumped out so the sump is super active and swapped out every couple years. I have a water powered back up sump that kicks ass in case of power loss or sump pump failure. I have water sensor alarms set up and have flood insurance but still have nightmares about walking down the stairs to…. Anyone else ?

    Is there something I’m missing that will help me sleep ? I had no idea how evil water was until I bought a house.

    #2 4 months ago

    My pin is upstairs but if I end up getting more before moving to a larger house, I fear that I might end up in a similar situation. My thought is that while the legs would get damaged it’s unlikely water would reach the cabinet and the legs could be replaced? Has anyone ever had experience with that?

    #3 4 months ago
    Quoted from shlt_thunder:

    My pin is upstairs but if I end up getting more before moving to a larger house, I fear that I might end up in a similar situation. My thought is that while the legs would get damaged it’s unlikely water would reach the cabinet and the legs could be replaced? Has anyone ever had experience with that?

    Not sure but it seems every year we get those “once in a lifetime” 6 inch rainstorms and I’ve seen the aftermath and it’s ungood.

    #4 4 months ago

    Ever thought about a French Drain System around the foundation? That would let the water drain away from the house. Obviously it is not the solution for every situation especially if there is no way to daylight the drain. I lived in a house (when I was about 9) that had issues like you describe. We were at the bottom of a hill with a basement and sump. French drain should have been installed when that place was built. Putting one in after being built can be pricy though.

    #5 4 months ago

    I would love some rain down here. It is 100°+ every day

    #6 4 months ago

    I do, because I own a cleaning company and when something floods i gotta go out that night. Worked 75hrs last week from all this crap.

    #7 4 months ago

    My backyard has a downward slant, so everything up hill comes to my yard.
    I have a French drain, covered patio with retaining wall, 2 12 inch storm drains. A lot of money invested
    In holes in the ground. I still freak when it rains, but at least my toys have legs.

    #8 4 months ago

    try living in a cyclone area
    right on the beach
    in a house where the roof leaks even in moderate rain

    #9 4 months ago

    I have a sump pump and a house backup generator with a 500 gallon propane tank. Raised ranch with backyard sloped toward the house. I had water come through the wall where it was cut for a window not put in.

    I always unplug my vintage stereo equipment and all the pins.

    #10 4 months ago
    Quoted from Chisox:

    Not sure but it seems every year we get those “once in a lifetime” 6 inch rainstorms and I’ve seen the aftermath and it’s ungood.

    Document that you have the pin for your homeowners insurance and get renters insurance if you rent. Maybe you could talk to your insurance agent for piece of mind? Or you might be able to take out a separate policy for the pins for peace of mind? I say this knowing the insurance companies would most likely try to screw you. At one point my vinyl records were insured for like 30k but I don’t have the policy any longer.

    #11 4 months ago

    I felt this way as well. However early this year I had sumps go out and battery backup was so old it didn't help. I caught it early Sunday morning so we did the dry vac and hauled filled buckets up the stairs and dumped water outside. Didn't hit pins. My wife and I had help son in law ,grandson and later my son.
    Plumber came out that morning and replaced sump. Then next week had new battery backup installed.
    So you think I'm good right? Well I added a second sump pump in the pit, so now have 2 regular sump pumps that discharge in our lake plus battery. Also I'm religious on putting on extensions on the down spouts and just cleaned the gutters this morning.

    Then 10 days ago my Generac natural gas generator ordered in February was installed for the whole house. I think I'm covered .
    Whew.

    #12 4 months ago
    Quoted from Chisox:

    Sitting here in my basement in the middle of a three day midwest thunderstorm with my pins and other electronics and praying that sump pump keeps up is something that’s getting old.
    I have a raised ranch so my basement is super wide and downhill so I get a lot of water that gets pumped out so the sump is super active and swapped out every couple years. I have a water powered back up sump that kicks ass in case of power loss or sump pump failure. I have water sensor alarms set up and have flood insurance but still have nightmares about walking down the stairs to…. Anyone else ?
    Is there something I’m missing that will help me sleep ? I had no idea how evil water was until I bought a house.

    Get a second electric sump pump. A sump pump is a single point failure - meaning no backup plan. If it goes out, you'll be in a world of hurt. You mentioned the water powered backup - but can it keep up? So I'm not sure if that is adequate if you have concerns already. Just do this - unplug the main pump and see if the water backup can keep up during these storms (we're getting the same ones).

    I have two sump pumps, each on a seperate breaker and separate PVC runs. And one is also battery backup model. And a Generac outside. But even if you just use a single PVC run and tie them together, still a heck of a lot better than doing nothing if the main pump fails. Even a cheap Harbor Freight one is better than nothing.

    Ditto on the french drain, best to never have to pump it out in the first place. But a 2nd sump pump is a quick way to help eliminate problems.

    What size is your current sump pump? 1/3hp, 1/2hp?

    #13 4 months ago
    Quoted from indybru:

    I felt this way as well. However early this year I had sumps go out and battery backup was so old it didn't help. I caught it early Sunday morning so we did the dry vac and hauled filled buckets up the stairs and dumped water outside. Didn't hit pins. I had help son inlaw ,grandson and later my son.
    Plumber came out that morning and replaced sump. Then next week had new battery backup installed.
    So you think I'm good right? Well I added a second sump pump in the pit, so now have 2 regular sump pumps that discharge in our lake plus battery.
    Then 10 days ago my Generac natural gas generator ordered in February was installed for the whole house. I think I'm covered .
    Whew.

    Make sure the two sump pumps are on separate breakers!

    #14 4 months ago

    I live on a sandy lot. I have more fear about the house getting hit by lightning. It seems to happen a lot around here.

    #15 4 months ago

    I have spent some good money on lightning protection, because one night while watching tv, the set pop'ed. And dead. The lightning got in to the co-ax 75 ohm cable. It pop'ed both tvs and one was not on. No pins hurt because it didnt get in the regular electrical system.
    Now I run around and pull plugs anyway. Monster makes some good line conditioners. My voltage ranges from 114-122, and I have so tube type audio gear, plus the pins to loose. I highly suggest the Monster power boxes from my experience. They have protection as well as conditioner for like 10 plugs plus co-ax and also phone lines.

    #16 4 months ago
    Quoted from kruzman:

    I have spent some good money on lightning protection, because one night while watching tv, the set pop'ed. And dead. The lightning got in to the co-ax 75 ohm cable. It pop'ed both tvs and one was not on. No pins hurt because it didnt get in the regular electrical system.
    Now I run around and pull plugs anyway. Monster makes some good line conditioners. My voltage ranges from 114-122, and I have so tube type audio gear, plus the pins to loose. I highly suggest the Monster power boxes from my experience. They have protection as well as conditioner for like 10 plugs plus co-ax and also phone lines.

    I have a couple of these (I have two breaker boxes) for the power line protection coming into the house. Then have suppressors at the outlets. Nothing will survive a direct hit - but I do what I can. They snap into an unused breaker location and cover both poles of the AC.

    pasted_image (resized).png

    Regarding your TV's - you can get lightning arrestors for the antenna coax line. Here's a quick Amazon search.

    pasted_image (resized).png

    #17 4 months ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I have a couple of these (I have two breaker boxes) for the power line protection coming into the house. Then have suppressors at the outlets. Nothing will survive a direct hit - but I do what I can. They snap into an unused breaker location and cover both poles of the AC.
    Regarding your TV's - you can get lightning arrestors for the antenna coax line. Here's a quick Amazon search.
    [quoted image][quoted image]

    Ah, fantastic! thank you. On my main breaker box, will one handle both poles, or both sides? or do I need 2?
    I am not a big fan of the net, mostly because of social media gone wrong, but getting info/suggestions like this is awesome. also looking up how to do something on u tube. bless those people who make those videos.
    Oh and of course pinside. robin and the moderators do a great job.

    I think storms in this area are getting way worse. we rarely just have a light rain day. This weekend we are suppose to get 5--7 in of rain with constant threat of lightning and hail.

    I was a builder for 21 years, and if I still was, I would constantly be thinking of ways to anticipate the effects and damage from the crazy weather

    #18 4 months ago
    Quoted from kruzman:

    Ah, fantastic! thank you. On my main breaker box, will one handle both poles, or both sides? or do I need 2?
    I am not a big fan of the net, mostly because of social media gone wrong, but getting info/suggestions like this is awesome. also looking up how to do something on u tube. bless those people who make those videos.
    Oh and of course pinside. robin and the moderators do a great job.
    I think storms in this area are getting way worse. we rarely just have a light rain day. This weekend we are suppose to get 5--7 in of rain with constant threat of lightning and hail.
    I was a builder for 21 years, and if I still was, I would constantly be thinking of ways to anticipate the effects and damage from the crazy weather

    That will cover both poles with a single device. Ideally, it should be in the first spot after the AC feed from outside (i.e. between the house breaker and the individual breakers). I admit tho, since I retrofitted mine, it's at the bottom of one of the breaker boxes. Not ideal, but better than nothing (maybe). It also has a ground wire and that wire should be short as possible, straight if possible (no sharp bends). A wire looks like an inductor which defeats the purpose of shunting a transient away, so try to minimize it.

    I can elaborate why the first breaker spot is the best, but don't want to get too technical or type a wordy reply.

    I'm not an electrician, but an electrical engineer and part of my prior day job (recently retired) was to design high power RF limiters into my designs. RF limiters aren't exactly surge suppressors, but the overall concept regarding operation/placement is the same.

    #19 4 months ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    Get a second electric sump pump. A sump pump is a single point failure - meaning no backup plan. If it goes out, you'll be in a world of hurt. You mentioned the water powered backup - but can it keep up? So I'm not sure if that is adequate if you have concerns already. Just do this - unplug the main pump and see if the water backup can keep up during these storms (we're getting the same ones).
    I have two sump pumps, each on a seperate breaker and separate PVC runs. And one is also battery backup model. And a Generac outside. But even if you just use a single PVC run and tie them together, still a heck of a lot better than doing nothing if the main pump fails. Even a cheap Harbor Freight one is better than nothing.
    Ditto on the french drain, best to never have to pump it out in the first place. But a 2nd sump pump is a quick way to help eliminate problems.
    What size is your current sump pump? 1/3hp, 1/2hp?

    I use 1/2 hp cast iron Zoeller pumps. The water backup has been triggered and can keep up during storms during power loss or when there’s a problem with the main pump. I thought about having a second pit dug and/or adding a second electric pump. I also have flood insurance and coverage for the toys in the basement. All downspouts are connected to pvc underground that takes the rain water at least 30 ft away from the house. We’ve had 3 inches of rain already and it’s going to pour for two more days…good times!

    #20 4 months ago
    Quoted from Chisox:

    I use 1/2 hp cast iron Zoeller pumps. The water backup has been triggered and can keep up during storms during power loss or when there’s a problem with the main pump. I thought about having a second pit dug and/or adding a second electric pump. I also have flood insurance and coverage for the toys in the basement. All downspouts are connected to pvc underground that takes the rain water at least 30 ft away from the house. We’ve had 3 inches of rain already and it’s going to pour for two more days…good times!

    I have both pumps in a single pit (pit isn't anything special other than being deeper). Not trying to twist your arm about a 2nd pump, just that it might be easier than you think. Especially if you have some very basic plumbing skills. If you don't have room, I'd just buy another pump and stick it on a shelf as backup insurance.

    Your flood ins.: Is that the FEMA policy (i.e. a real flood) or just thru you typical residential policy (i.e. State arm, Allstate, etc.)? My State Farm policy covers sump pump failure, but I also bought a preferred rate FEMA policy since the area I live at is newly developed and I just was a little worried just in case the developer screwed up something or we got one of the 'once in a 100 years' rains. That wasn't covered by State farm.

    Sorry, don't mean to sound like I'm nagging. I finished the basement a number of years ago and go out of my way to keep it dry! Pins, bar, theater, etc., so a bit of an investment down there.

    #21 4 months ago
    Quoted from drummermike:

    I have a sump pump and a house backup generator with a 500 gallon propane tank. Raised ranch with backyard sloped toward the house. I had water come through the wall where it was cut for a window not put in.

    At our old (but new build) house, we had a spot in the basement wall where you could see some aggregate (i.e. stones where the concrete didn't mix well). At some point it did leak. One local basement repair company used epoxy injection to fill the voids. They drill some holes, then inject the epoxy under pressure. Worked great. Sounds like that would solve your issue too.

    #22 4 months ago

    I thought this thread was going to be about whirlwind

    #23 4 months ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I have both pumps in a single pit (pit isn't anything special other than being deeper). Not trying to twist your arm about a 2nd pump, just that it might be easier than you think. Especially if you have some very basic plumbing skills. If you don't have room, I'd just buy another pump and stick it on a shelf as backup insurance.
    Your flood ins.: Is that the FEMA policy (i.e. a real flood) or just thru you typical residential policy (i.e. State arm, Allstate, etc.)? My State Farm policy covers sump pump failure, but I also bought a preferred rate FEMA policy since the area I live at is newly developed and I just was a little worried just in case the developer screwed up something or we got one of the 'once in a 100 years' rains. That wasn't covered by State farm.
    Sorry, don't mean to sound like I'm nagging. I finished the basement a number of years ago and go out of my way to keep it dry! Pins, bar, theater, etc., so a bit of an investment down there.

    I am definitely going to look into a second pump on a separate breaker and possibly making my pit deeper. Insurance is through typical insurer.

    #24 4 months ago
    Quoted from Chisox:

    I am definitely going to look into a second pump on a separate breaker and possibly making my pit deeper. Insurance is through typical insurer.

    Problem is what if your power goes off, which is often when you need the pump the most. Invest in a generator. Portable or whole house, but you need back up. I have two pumps, one on each side of the house. One has a backup battery, but both are hooked to my generator transfer switch. I have never had water in my basement and both my pits are bone dry, but I still worry given all the work I’ve done to my basement.

    Sump pump failure insurance is lame because it’s limited to like $5k.

    #25 4 months ago
    Quoted from Lermods:

    Problem is what if your power goes off, which is often when you need the pump the most. Invest in a generator. Portable or whole house, but you need back up. I have two pumps, one on each side of the house. One has a backup battery, but both are hooked to my generator transfer switch. I have never had water in my basement and both my pits are bone dry, but I still worry given all the work I’ve done to my basement.
    Sump pump failure insurance is lame because it’s limited to like $5k.

    My backup is water powered so it works when the power is off. Generator is on the agenda as well.

    #26 4 months ago

    You are lucky, we have well and septic. No power, no water.

    #27 4 months ago

    Zoeller pumps, made right in Louisville, are awesome. Have you gone as crazy as me: calculating the volume of water removed w each pump run? In the worst storms it was pumping 1500 gallons/ hour, turning on every 12-15 seconds. I knew my crappy Home Depot battery backup wouldn’t keep up in that case. So I had a company, The Basement Doctor, install a bigger pit that has 3 pumps. One is the main. Second is if first one fails or can’t keep up (goes to separate pvc pipe). Third is a marine battery capable of discharge 10,000 gallons. Overkill? Maybe. But I’ve slept better ever since.

    #28 4 months ago

    I also have flood insurance and coverage for the toys in the basement.

    Hey John, just a heads up. I have flood insurance also, but a NFIP flood policy doesn't cover anything below ground level other than mechanicals. My home is a ranch so first floor damage could be a lot of damage. The only way to cover weather related water damage in basement is with the backup sewer and drain endorsement coverage. That endorsement excludes flood though. Pray the water doesn't come in from the window wells.

    Cheers.

    #29 4 months ago
    Quoted from indybru:

    I also have flood insurance and coverage for the toys in the basement.
    Hey John, just a heads up. I have flood insurance also, but a NFIP flood policy doesn't cover anything below ground level other than mechanicals. My home is a ranch so first floor damage could be a lot of damage. The only way to cover weather related water damage in basement is with the backup sewer and drain endorsement coverage. That endorsement excludes flood though.
    Cheers.

    Thanks for the info Bruce! Now if I could just get this rain to stop!

    #30 4 months ago
    Quoted from Lermods:

    Problem is what if your power goes off, which is often when you need the pump the most. Invest in a generator. Portable or whole house, but you need back up. I have two pumps, one on each side of the house. One has a backup battery, but both are hooked to my generator transfer switch...

    Just a heads up...my 2nd sump pump that has a battery backup (bought before I got the Generac) was a Watchdog 1/2hp. It never ran unless it was me testing it occasionally. I set that float higher than the primary pump.

    So good piece of mind, right? Nope - the stupid casing rotted thru in about 6 years. Didn't dump anything else in the pit and I even brushed off the pumps with a soft brush occasionally. Fired it up one day and a ton of water went shooting out the side. What a fail. Of course, I freaked out and since I wanted a another pump immediately...and like an idiot I bought another one! I keep an eye on it, but definitely won't buy another Watchdog.

    Just wanted to toss that out there just in case you had a WatchDog.

    #31 4 months ago
    Quoted from lancestorm:

    Zoeller pumps, made right in Louisville, are awesome. Have you gone as crazy as me: calculating the volume of water removed w each pump run? In the worst storms it was pumping 1500 gallons/ hour, turning on every 12-15 seconds. I knew my crappy Home Depot battery backup wouldn’t keep up in that case. So I had a company, The Basement Doctor, install a bigger pit that has 3 pumps. One is the main. Second is if first one fails or can’t keep up (goes to separate pvc pipe). Third is a marine battery capable of discharge 10,000 gallons. Overkill? Maybe. But I’ve slept better ever since.

    I'm just as bad...I have an z-wave energy monitor on the pumps that is tied into the SmartHome stuff. I can even plot how often/long the sump runs.

    Yeah...anal retentive, LOL.

    #32 4 months ago

    I thought this post was gunna be about Whirlwind, the pin

    #33 4 months ago
    Quoted from Lermods:

    You are lucky, we have well and septic. No power, no water.

    I grew up this way so I can relate. To this day when the power goes out I STILL act like….awe darn, can’t take a shower.

    There are benefits and drawbacks. If I had a well I could ignore the city watering rules. No water bill except when a repair bill comes. I suppose it’s (wait for it) a wash.

    I don’t miss the extremely high iron levels.

    #34 4 months ago
    Quoted from EJS:

    I grew up this way so I can relate. To this day when the power goes out I STILL act like….awe darn, can’t take a shower.
    There are benefits and drawbacks. If I had a well I could ignore the city watering rules. No water bill except when a repair bill comes. I suppose it’s (wait for it) a wash.
    I don’t miss the extremely high iron levels.

    Our small rural community (35 newer homes on ~2 acre lots) tossed out the *great* idea of wanting to be on city water...until the city quoted ~$18K to hook up each lot plus monthly fees. That didn't get much traction.

    Took care of iron (mostly the sulphur smell) with an iron filter. We are on city sewer tho, which is OK, septic systems are rather expensive nowadays.

    #35 4 months ago

    So we’re at about 4 to 5” of rain with more to come tomorrow and the Zoeller is going like a champ. It’s cycling on every 30 seconds. My brother (who lives in the same town) had his main pump, backup, and two pool pumps going and still had an inch of water. Mother nature can be a real bitch.

    #36 4 months ago
    Quoted from EJS:

    I grew up this way so I can relate. To this day when the power goes out I STILL act like….awe darn, can’t take a shower.
    There are benefits and drawbacks. If I had a well I could ignore the city watering rules. No water bill except when a repair bill comes. I suppose it’s (wait for it) a wash.
    I don’t miss the extremely high iron levels.

    I’m not a fan of well and septic systems. No water bill, but components are expensive to replace, pump, tank, softener, etc. I personally don’t have iron issues and we have a good system, but replacing the septic system (and the mess that goes along with it) will far outweigh the quarterly water bill. Even though water is basically free, you can’t run multiple loads of laundry every day or take 10 min showers if you want your septic system to last. I’ll be happier i think when my next house is back on city water.

    #37 4 months ago
    Quoted from Chisox:

    So we’re at about 4 to 5” of rain with more to come tomorrow and the Zoeller is going like a champ. It’s cycling on every 30 seconds. My brother (who lives in the same town) had his main pump, backup, and two pool pumps going and still had an inch of water. Mother nature can be a real bitch.

    I feel your pain, hopefully it stops soon. I usually have my eyes glued to the radar when we have heavy storms. I’m surprised the Midwest has so much rain from a storm moving northwest, where does all that moisture come from? We get a lot of rain as moisture is pulled from the Gulf and the Atlantic. Worst we’ve ever had here is 8” over 2 days and I had no issues. 4” is usually the max. Sweaty palms though for sure and I don’t sleep well.

    #38 4 months ago

    Take it from a plumber.... Nine times out of ten it is a grading problem. Add topsoil and plant grass against the house and pitch away from house. Extend rain gutters and next time it rains... go outside and make sure they are not clogged and overflowing like a waterfall. Get the water away from the foundation. I have changed hundreds of sump pumps in my career and installed many water backup pumps and battery backup pumps. Liberty in my opinion makes the best pump. It is more of a failing sump pump switch than the motor itself being the problem. If you have a window with a dug out well, get a plastic dome.
    Make sure sump discharge is away from the house so it does not drain back through the outside wall and come back into the pit.

    #39 4 months ago
    Quoted from ritch12345:

    Take it from a plumber.... Nine times out of ten it is a grading problem. Add topsoil and plant grass against the house and pitch away from house. Extend rain gutters and next time it rains... go outside and make sure they are not clogged and overflowing like a waterfall. Get the water away from the foundation. I have changed hundreds of sump pumps in my career and installed many water backup pumps and battery backup pumps. Liberty in my opinion makes the best pump. It is more of a failing sump pump switch than the motor itself being the problem. If you have a window with a dug out well, get a plastic dome.
    Make sure sump discharge is away from the house so it does not drain back through the outside wall and come back into the pit.

    all very good advice and not that expensive. water is the enemy. I am house poor for 6 more years and 3 months, so I worry every time we get this crap. The river bend is 50 ft from my house, and it is above the bank and raging. Looks like 60% chance of rain every day till friday for south MI. I wrote a friend friday morning that I was one more camel straw from going postal.

    If the sub pumps were going on every minute, I would be really worried also. I have had bad experience trying to get money out of the insurance company, so I dont even expect anything from them.

    The pic is looking out my window on NYE

    jan2 (resized).jpg
    2 weeks later
    #40 3 months ago

    I actually monitor how much the sump pump runs via the smart home setup.

    Helps me keep an eye on if everything is behaving. 1.5" rain today, so not a whole lot going on, I do a good job of making sure the water runs away from the house.

    pasted_image (resized).png
    #41 3 months ago
    Quoted from indybru:

    I felt this way as well. However early this year I had sumps go out and battery backup was so old it didn't help. I caught it early Sunday morning so we did the dry vac and hauled filled buckets up the stairs and dumped water outside. Didn't hit pins. My wife and I had help son in law ,grandson and later my son.
    Plumber came out that morning and replaced sump. Then next week had new battery backup installed.
    So you think I'm good right? Well I added a second sump pump in the pit, so now have 2 regular sump pumps that discharge in our lake plus battery. Also I'm religious on putting on extensions on the down spouts and just cleaned the gutters this morning.
    Then 10 days ago my Generac natural gas generator ordered in February was installed for the whole house. I think I'm covered .
    Whew.

    Known as the "Sump on Steroids" by Foundation Systems of Michigan. Always mount the 2nd electric pump an inch or two higher than the other one.

    #42 3 months ago

    Also, see the thread aboot moving to Las Vegas.... I brought a NIB Zoeller 1/2 HP pump I kept on the shelf with me for when I need to drain the 18,000 gallon pool.

    No sump here. Even the few houses with basements that I looked at over the past 25 or so years have a sump installed but no pump.

    #43 3 months ago
    Quoted from Chisox:

    I have water sensor alarms set up and have flood insurance but still have nightmares about walking down the stairs to…. Anyone else ?

    Yes, every damn time. My buddy and I were discussing either a backup or spare sump pump the other night actually. After all the money and time I've put into my basement, I'd be devastated if it got flooded.

    My insurance agent told me that I wasn't able to purchase flood insurance because I didn't live in a defined flood zone. I was also told that water through the walls isn't covered as it is considered a flood.

    #44 3 months ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    At our old (but new build) house, we had a spot in the basement wall where you could see some aggregate (i.e. stones where the concrete didn't mix well). At some point it did leak. One local basement repair company used epoxy injection to fill the voids. They drill some holes, then inject the epoxy under pressure. Worked great. Sounds like that would solve your issue too.

    You can actually do this yourself for a few hundred bucks. I did it on a crack in the foundation that, along with a poorly graded section around the house and a lot of rain, allowed water in while we were framing. I posted about it in my build thread.

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/game-room-build-thread#post-3016271

    #45 3 months ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    ...My insurance agent told me that I wasn't able to purchase flood insurance because I didn't live in a defined flood zone. I was also told that water through the walls isn't covered as it is considered a flood.

    I'm definitely no flood ins. expert, but I sort of thought that was the entire reason for having the FEMA Preferred rate plan (i.e. lower cost plans for people that have little risk of flooding, which I have). I looked at it as a way to for the government to help subsidize the high risk plans.

    You don't buy thru FEMA, but rather thru your regular ins. agent. In my case, it was State Farm. Maybe your agent just doesn't carry it?

    #46 3 months ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    You can actually do this yourself for a few hundred bucks. I did it on a crack in the foundation that, along with a poorly graded section around the house and a lot of rain, allowed water in while we were framing. I posted about it in my build thread.
    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/game-room-build-thread#post-3016271

    Good deal!

    I remember when dealing with this issue, one repair guy wanted to dig down the outside wall, cut out a section, and pour in a new hunk of concrete. What a stupid idea - the new concrete will shrink slightly, leaving a gap, making a minor problem even bigger. Then I stumbled upon the epoxy solution. Never had another issue w/weeping all the years we lived there.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

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