(Topic ID: 280577)

Anyone do laserdiscs or vintage home theaters/stereos?


By sataneatscheese

82 days ago



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  • 82 posts
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  • Latest reply 1 hour ago by ScottThePhotog
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Topic poll

“Vintage home theater?”

  • Sounds cool! 6 votes
    22%
  • Don't waste your time. 10 votes
    37%
  • I've actually still got mine! 11 votes
    41%

(27 votes)

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#1 82 days ago

I'm looking into it. Facebook and Craigslist is filled with old stereos and TVs at "come and take it" prices. I always thought laserdiscs were neat, but never had a player or discs. From time to time, I see a local collection of 50 or 100 discs and a player come up near me for cheaps, and am thinking about snagging one and setting up a separate "vintage home theater" in a corner of my basement. An old CRT TV with S-VIDEO input, a component stereo system, and a laser disc player. I always thought the larger discs were like mini posters, and I think it fits in well with the vintage arcade vibe many of us going for. Many of the laser disc movies are action movies which is what I'd be interested in.

I fully understand it is much easier to watch something streaming or dvd/Blu-ray, but am looking for more the decor, vibe, and forcing myself to seeing some period movies from the time. Demolition man, Jurassic Park, Terminator 2, etc.

Does anyone actually still have a setup like this? If so, I'd love to see a picture.

#2 82 days ago

I still have my Laserdisc player hooked up to my home theater. It gets some occasional use when I want to play something that hasn’t ever come out on DVD/Blu-ray/UHD. I think the last movie we watched was Song of the South.

At 110” on a 4K LCoS projector it’s not the best quality but still livable with some decent scaling.

I still keep the discs in my dedicated closet simply to display their excellent artwork.

#3 82 days ago

I used to collect laserdiscs
they are a pain in the butt, you have to turn them over or change the disc as each side only runs for 60 minutes
they were good in the day, but compared to DVD, bluray, streaming, the quality is not there

also look up laser rot, something gets into the discs and causes defects, this can cause the disc to skip, not play or physically separate

#4 82 days ago

I did in the 90s when that shit was high tech.

#5 82 days ago
Quoted from PopBumperPete:

you have to turn them over or change the disc as each side only runs for 60 minutes

I had a Sony one that didn't require turning the disc over. It paused and then continued on it's own.

LTG : )

#6 82 days ago
Quoted from LTG:

I had a Sony one that didn't require turning the disc over. It paused and then continued on it's own.
LTG : )

which reminds me, Laserdisc players are deeper than other components (LTGs unit was deeper still)

#7 82 days ago

I get the retro vibe and all, and I loved my LD collection, but I cant go back to watching shitty quality like that. EXpecially using up a bunch of space for pinball. Plus I find pinball machines are easier to move than my XBR2 32" I had...what a beast.
Mine was also a no flipper. Only thing I still have is my 2001 Criterion set.

#8 79 days ago

So my dumb butt found these at the local vintage vinyl shop. I paid too much for these ($10 each), but always wanted a few and why the heck not. For some reason, I always wanted to pull a CED disk out and handle it. These are mounted opposite my pinball wall. If I come across a bunch of these for cheaps at a yard sale I may buy them along with a player as I have no way to view these. Pick out the ones I like, mount them, and recycle/trade the rest. Maybe watch a few over S-Video (gotta stay fancy!).

It was great taking kids into a used record store and explaining to them what all the different media was. That? Thats a record. That? That's a cassette.

There are a few I know I'd like to put up on the wall... in the theme of sticking with pinball: Demo Man, Jurassic Park, and T2.

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#9 79 days ago

I have cd, record player, cassette and laser disc. Lol I mostly collect CDs and records

#10 79 days ago

You can score a great vintage home theater that our best modern ones for a fraction of the cost.

A Barco tri crt, an old Krell HTS2 (saw one for 800$) and a Theta or a Krell 5 channel amplifier with a laserdisc on top you are golden (just don't get an auto reverse one they keep failing)

For 3k$ you can get a rig that used to cost north of 50k

#11 79 days ago
Quoted from adol75:

You can score a great vintage home theater that our best modern ones for a fraction of the cost.
A Barco tri crt, an old Krell HTS2 (saw one for 800$) and a Theta or a Krell 5 channel amplifier with a laserdisc on top you are golden (just don't get an auto reverse one they keep failing)
For 3k$ you can get a rig that used to cost north of 50k

Looking through the laserdiscs at the record store I was surprised at how much they cost back in the day. I was born in 1986 and vaguely remember the high end store selling these before DVDs came out and them being expensive. I didn't realize how over the top they were back in the day. For example, they had those Star Trek the original series Laserdiscs with the factory sticker of 29.95 for 2 episodes. If those were released when I was born... thats $70 for 2 episodes of Star Trek.

Interestingly enough, those CEDs, that are in the photo on the left, look even worse in person than the photo. Imagine the print quality you get on an Atari cartidge.

T2 is cool though... If I wasn't already doing backglasses behind my machine or didn't have the height for them I'd totally do these Laserdiscs behind the pins.

#12 79 days ago
Quoted from sataneatscheese:

I didn't realize how over the top they were back in the day.

They had X rated ones too.

Home theater. Surround sound. What a trip.

LTG : )

#13 79 days ago

Pity you did not get T2 limited edition
3 or 4 discs, letter from James Cameron, advertisement for a T2 jacket

#14 79 days ago

A few years ago a neighbor put a stack of over 100 discs and a player in their driveway with a sign that said free to good home. I grabbed it. Lots of good titles. Compared to DVD/Blu-ray the quality is not good. If you want more crap to collect it’s cool. I don’t plan on getting more really. But laser rot is a problem and will happen to most of these at some point unfortunately. The artwork is cool for sure.

I even looked at Half Price books when I got them and they would not even buy them...they said they have a hard time selling them.

#15 79 days ago

I think the quality is quite good - especially the audio - but not on HD TVs.

I have a lot, as it was my jam back in the 90’s. Without a CRT I’m not sure it’s worth it. Or I’d there a converter that can scale up the quality on an HD flat screen?

#16 79 days ago
Quoted from LTG:

They had X rated ones too.
Home theater. Surround sound. What a trip.
LTG : )

Laserdisc porn? Was that actually a thing?

#17 79 days ago
Quoted from PopBumperPete:

Pity you did not get T2 limited edition
3 or 4 discs, letter from James Cameron, advertisement for a T2 jacket

That m sounds sweet. I was wavering between T2 and Logans run in the store.

Quoted from Pickle:

A few years ago a neighbor put a stack of over 100 discs and a player in their driveway with a sign that said free to good home. I grabbed it. Lots of good titles. Compared to DVD/Blu-ray the quality is not good. If you want more crap to collect it’s cool. I don’t plan on getting more really. But laser rot is a problem and will happen to most of these at some point unfortunately. The artwork is cool for sure.
I even looked at Half Price books when I got them and they would not even buy them...they said they have a hard time selling them.

Jelly

Quoted from TheFamilyArcade:

I think the quality is quite good - especially the audio - but not on HD TVs.
I have a lot, as it was my jam back in the 90’s. Without a CRT I’m not sure it’s worth it. Or I’d there a converter that can scale up the quality on an HD flat screen?

I think people will pay you to haul off a CRT TV these days. I thi k the big thing is using SVideo instead of composite. My plasma tv has that still.

Quoted from Crash:

Laserdisc porn? Was that actually a thing?

Mandatory not my ad, but in looking for discs on craigslist...

newjersey.craigslist.org link

#18 79 days ago

I still have my laser disc collection
About 100 various discs.
I got 3 LD players
a couple as back up if/when one takes a dump.
Have not played them in forever to see how the quality is compared to DVDs.
About half my collection is animation classics
I got all the Tom& Jerrys and the rest of the MGM cartoon catalog
Same for Disney
Woody Woodpecker and other Walter Lantz cartunes
The Classic Fleischer Popeye collection
and of course the complete Warner Bros cartoon Classics collections (30s-50s).
They have not released most of the above in DVD or Blu Ray yet.

I still have got a NIB (Top of the line at the time) Mitsubishi VCR
and several Betamax players.
Adcom 200W Power amplifier and Pre Amp
Nakamichi multi CD player
Concept 110W receiver
Technics Phonograph
And stacked Advent speakers
Plus all kinds of other vintage A/V equipment.

#19 79 days ago
Quoted from Crash:

Laserdisc porn? Was that actually a thing?

Yes.

I've still got some in storage. Maybe 6.

Really strange in surround sound.

LTG : )

#20 79 days ago

Interesting subject. Laserdisc is probably the last format anyone would think of when you mention home theater these days.

I've been contributing to a relatively new software project designed to capture the raw radio frequency signal from the laser as it reads the disc. For the nerds, the Laserdisc format used a series of pits and lands, much like a CD. However, it was not a digital format. The arrangement of pits and lands on the discs modulate an analog signal, which is picked up as RF when read by the laser. The software then reads the raw RF signal and looks for video, sound, subtitles, and other information on the disc. With a few scripts you can decode the resulting digital version of the RF signal and convert it to the original program, with very good results exceeding the best players!

This demo disc was fully played back in software, not via a capture card or very expensive MUSE player. Once it was captured, the player and disc are no longer needed to play it back.

#21 79 days ago

I was so “into” LD in the 90s that I still have a sealed, NIB Realistic-branded (made by Nippon Pioneer) player with a Sept. 1990 build date stashed away! I had amassed a collection of about 450 titles and bought it in around ‘94 at “clearance” pricing to hedge my bets against obsolescence, but never even opened the box because I ended up divesting of my LDs with the advent of DVD. By that time it was obvious that DVDs would replace LDs, and the newest players were starting to get cost-cut with wimpier spindle motors, flimsier disc drawers, weaker sled steppers and gears, and decreased quality laser heads; my 80s-early 90s Pioneer players were about twice as heavy as the stuff that was sold in the mid-90s.)

In very sharp contrast to the arguments that vinyl is superior to CDs, there’s absolutely no argument (other than silly nostalgia, which is irrational) to prefer LDs to DVDs. The discs are big, heavy, and often imbalanced (which causes a lot of mechanical noise during playback, as they spin MUCH faster than CDs), and are very susceptible to becoming unplayable due to “laser rot”, so even buying a pristine, sealed disc is a gamble (remember, the discs haven’t been made in about 20 years at this point, which is more than enough time to deteriorate even if sealed and stored in an optimal environment).

The video (recorded analog) quality is frankly piss-poor by today’s standards, and the optimal recording format (constant angular velocity) allowed only 60 minutes per side, so longer titles were spread across multiple discs. Audio could be encoded either digitally or analog (frequency-modulated similar to the way video tapes were recorded); the digital audio quality was actually the best attribute of LDs, and in fact LD players could actually do a better job with CD playback than most dedicated CD players at the time (owing largely to the very robust transport mechs loafing along when playing lightweight CDs, resulting in fewer read errors/“jitter”), and lots of audiophiles used the players exclusively as dedicated CD transports back in the day.

(I’m keeping the NIB player for the time-being in case I ever run across a nice Dragon’s Lair with a dead player at a bargain basement selling price, as its transport mech is a drop-in replacement. Also, it’s is a nice example of the kind of heavy-duty Japanese electronics quality that hasn’t existed in at least 25 years and probably can’t be obtained today at any price.)

A long-winded way of saying that LDs were cool tech when new, but offer absolutely no advantages at all in the 21st century, and really aren’t worth the effort (unless you are EXTREMELY bored and have a surplus of storage space for the discs, which are the same size as LPs but twice the thickness and probably 3x the mass). Not only do the discs degrade even when stored properly, but the remaining functional players are essentially unserviceable ticking time-bombs just biding their time until their unobtanium laser heads give up the ghost (which happens far more quickly than in a CD or DVD player, especially with Sony units).

If you are really committed though, good luck and have fun! Just know that using LDs in the 2020s is about as rational as installing an 8-track player in a new car!

#22 79 days ago
Quoted from Crash:

Laserdisc porn? Was that actually a thing?

That's what he said. haha

#23 78 days ago
Quoted from Thermionic:

I was so “into” LD in the 90s that I still have a sealed, NIB Realistic-branded (made by Nippon Pioneer) player with a Sept. 1990 build date stashed away! I had amassed a collection of about 450 titles and bought it in around ‘94 at “clearance” pricing to hedge my bets against obsolescence, but never even opened the box because I ended up divesting of my LDs with the advent of DVD. By that time it was obvious that DVDs would replace LDs, and the newest players were starting to get cost-cut with wimpier spindle motors, flimsier disc drawers, weaker sled steppers and gears, and decreased quality laser heads; my 80s-early 90s Pioneer players were about twice as heavy as the stuff that was sold in the mid-90s.)
In very sharp contrast to the arguments that vinyl is superior to CDs, there’s absolutely no argument (other than silly nostalgia, which is irrational) to prefer LDs to DVDs. The discs are big, heavy, and often imbalanced (which causes a lot of mechanical noise during playback, as they spin MUCH faster than CDs), and are very susceptible to becoming unplayable due to “laser rot”, so even buying a pristine, sealed disc is a gamble (remember, the discs haven’t been made in about 20 years at this point, which is more than enough time to deteriorate even if sealed and stored in an optimal environment).
The video (recorded analog) quality is frankly piss-poor by today’s standards, and the optimal recording format (constant angular velocity) allowed only 60 minutes per side, so longer titles were spread across multiple discs. Audio could be encoded either digitally or analog (frequency-modulated similar to the way video tapes were recorded); the digital audio quality was actually the best attribute of LDs, and in fact LD players could actually do a better job with CD playback than most dedicated CD players at the time (owing largely to the very robust transport mechs loafing along when playing lightweight CDs, resulting in fewer read errors/“jitter”), and lots of audiophiles used the players exclusively as dedicated CD transports back in the day.
(I’m keeping the NIB player for the time-being in case I ever run across a nice Dragon’s Lair with a dead player at a bargain basement selling price, as its transport mech is a drop-in replacement. Also, it’s is a nice example of the kind of heavy-duty Japanese electronics quality that hasn’t existed in at least 25 years and probably can’t be obtained today at any price.)
A long-winded way of saying that LDs were cool tech when new, but offer absolutely no advantages at all in the 21st century, and really aren’t worth the effort (unless you are EXTREMELY bored and have a surplus of storage space for the discs, which are the same size as LPs but twice the thickness and probably 3x the mass). Not only do the discs degrade even when stored properly, but the remaining functional players are essentially unserviceable ticking time-bombs just biding their time until their unobtanium laser heads give up the ghost (which happens far more quickly than in a CD or DVD player, especially with Sony units).
If you are really committed though, good luck and have fun! Just know that using LDs in the 2020s is about as rational as installing an 8-track player in a new car!

I fully understand and freely acknowledge that the quality of Laserdisc is vastly inferior to that of DVD. I’m interested in them because they were cool and something we couldn’t afford when I was a kid. I’m not going to sink a ton into this, maybe a few hundred on a stack of old Laserdiscs, an old CRT TV, and an old console sound system. People will practically pay you to haul most of this away. Maybe hook up an old Nintendo while I’m at it (I know there are lots of people into that).

I really like the art on a lot of these boxes and the size of the display. There are a few 80s and 90s movies I’d like to watch on Laserdisc like Demolition Man and Escape From New York. It seems appropriate. I could watch these on Netflix or buy a DVD for less, but it’s not the same. I’m only looking at action movies. Jurassic Park, Alien, DemoMan, Terminator2… the cases all look pretty cool.

#24 78 days ago

There was an advantage to LDs. Is that the movies on LD were for sale at the same time that Video Stores got their New Releases titled rental tapes. There was no other format of that new movie, until rental volumes dropped off for that movie.

Ironically the LD that delaminated the most was 'Eraser'.

#25 78 days ago

I still have my LD players and discs from the 90s as well. On a good CRT or a projection TV of the era they looked every bit as good as DVD when DVD launched (especially some of the really poorly compressed early ones) but as time went on, HDTV took over and DVD and BluRay got better LDs fell off, plus yeah they’re big an need to be flipped and yadda yadda. Still, pretty cool
to have the unmolested Star Wars Trilogy at my fingertips, lol.

I’d love to find an THX receiver and the AT 350THX speaker system and a couple Carver amps and make myself a retro home theater... but I spend all my extra cash on pinball, lol.

#26 78 days ago

Still have our collection of discs and player. Our player is "auto-reverse" so you don't have to flip the discs (which was annoying) - still an issue if I want to play my directors cut Aliens - that prick is 4 discs/7 sides. lol

#27 78 days ago

I've got about 200 Laserdiscs here at home. It's always fun to watch them every once in a while. Probably will watch Hunt for Red October tonight.

#28 78 days ago
Quoted from sataneatscheese:

I fully understand and freely acknowledge that the quality of Laserdisc is vastly inferior to that of DVD

I disagree actually. While DVD used the superior YCbCr encoding format, Laserdiscs were not digitally sampled or compressed. Depending on the color space, red was often (if not all the time) sampled at a lower resolution that the rest of the picture content, causing blockiness in areas of high color saturation. This is also not including digital MPEG-2 compression. Both artifacts are present on all DVDs.

Laserdiscs have flaws such as disc rot which deteriorates the signal to noise ratio at times, but it was the only consumer analog format that stored the video in full 6MHz composite bandwidth. It was basically better than broadcast, as broadcast had AM modulated noise in the picture and other distortions from over the air and cable transmissions. Not to mention most Laserdiscs use analog FM for the sound, which is not digitally compressed in contrast to AC-3 compressed audio for DVD.

#29 78 days ago

I looked into getting into LDs a few years ago, and decided not to due to the disc rot issue, and that even with upscaling, the picture would be not be comparable to DVDs. Decades ago we had a RCA Selectavision player, which is what The Great Escape disc was on one of your pictures. It was actually an analog system (much like a music record) that used a stylus. I have many memories of that system and was also looking to get the system again, however it would be even more further from the DVD experience and most of the movies were pan and scan.

Besides, aren't DVDs now almost considered "vintage"?

#30 78 days ago

Yeah "dvd quality" is out if date now.

#31 78 days ago
Quoted from sataneatscheese:

. I could watch these on Netflix or buy a DVD for less, but it’s not the same

It’s better. These are films. Seeing film on a better, higher resolution format is always closest to the theatrical experience. I loved LD in the 90s, because it was the only way to see movies in proper aspect ratio at home. Now it’s standard. Blu-Ray/4K/Streaming is awesome and movies look like film.

Just make sure to turn off post processing & smooth-o-vision if your TV has that on as default. Maybe that’s why you’re looking at older shit? Does your TV look like a soap opera? That’s just a setting. Turn it off, and all your 90s action movies will look correct at 24fps.

#32 78 days ago

I am a large laserdisc collector and I belong to various groups. Feel free to PM me. That being said it is a pain to use them and disc rot is a problem. I have a full vintage setup with a ADA stack and CRT projector. Probably 15 players and 1000+ LD's. LD's are great for late 80's to late 90's hard to find TV movies and stuff not released any other way but if available on another format it is generally not worth it.

#33 78 days ago

Hopefully I can get my raw disc capture solution hammered out soon. I'm basically hacking a standard video capture card so it will digitally sample the signal at about a 3.85 to 1 ratio. I'll probably share a successful decode and playback of something once I get a clean enough signal from the laser in my player.

1 week later
#34 70 days ago
Quoted from pinwiztom:

About half my collection is animation classics
I got all the Tom& Jerrys and the rest of the MGM cartoon catalog
Same for Disney
Woody Woodpecker and other Walter Lantz cartunes
The Classic Fleischer Popeye collection
and of course the complete Warner Bros cartoon Classics collections (30s-50s).
They have not released most of the above in DVD or Blu Ray yet.

And they may not release some of them again, or release them edited. Some are not PC now, so might be hard or impossible to get. Like an original Star Wars without the Lucas changes

#35 70 days ago

Laserdisc collector here. I grew up watching Tom and Jerry and the Looney Tunes on Laserdisc. Still have those box sets and will never get rid of them.

I started seriously collecting about 3.5 years ago. I've got over 1500 titles in my collection. For me, nothing beats Laserdisc when it comes to audio. Uncompressed digital audio, original theater mixes, and killer AC3 and DTS soundtracks that will shake the house!

One of my collection goals is to be Criterion Collection complete, and I'm about 70% there. There are so many releases with great extras and commentaries that aren't available anywhere else.

One of my favorite things is to spin a late release or DTS disc for someone who has never seen a Laserdisc. They are always blown away by the sound and typically impressed with the picture quality, especially for a technology designed in the 70s! Hearing the blu-ray after is always a let down.

The picture quality on late releases is usually quite good. Sometimes on par with DVD or better since there is no digital compression or artifacts. It's amazing how much they were able to progress and maximize the potential of that format. The difference between the very early DiscoVision titles and the releases in the 90s with discrete surround sound is just incredible.

This was my collection about a year ago. I've added probably about another 100-200 discs since then.
IMG_20191006_221922664-2 (resized).jpg

#36 70 days ago

We still have our HLD-X0 setup.

Just waiting to connect it up to 4k laser pj.

Muse discs & std laserdiscs.

Also a LaserActive player with discs.

Sad I know.

#37 69 days ago
Quoted from Crash:

Laserdisc porn? Was that actually a thing?

Found one starring Marilyn, $49.99 in 1984 is like $125.00 today.
As far as the Movie Atlantic City, you get to see Susan Sarandon's bare tits when she was 33. They were still somewhat decent.

All of the service techs at the route operator I worked for got free Laser Disc Players compliments of Gottlieb/Mylstar/Ratslym as they failed in the M*A*C*H*3 video games but worked fine when used to play discs in a home environment.

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#38 68 days ago

I have about 50 laser discs... no player. Make an offer...

#39 68 days ago

I'm a little unclear on this Disc Rot issue - are all Disc's susceptible to it, or just some (certain manufacturer's, etc.). If a disc doesn't have it by now, is it not going to get it? Can a Disc surface be polished to remove it?
Inquiring minds want to know ....

#40 68 days ago

I have a working LD player and a couple dozen discs that were given to me years ago. Also have a working Video Disc player. I mostly collect DVD/Blu Ray tho. Currently over 2000 titles there.

Quoted from Rarehero:

Just make sure to turn off post processing & smooth-o-vision if your TV has that on as default. Maybe that’s why you’re looking at older shit? Does your TV look like a soap opera? That’s just a setting. Turn it off, and all your 90s action movies will look correct at 24fps.

Man, every time I go to someone's house to watch an old movie they have this damn smoothing setting turned on. I see it right away and it gets under my skin because everything looks like a soap opera or old news footage. In every case, the person gets offended when I mention it and argues that their tv is fine. The times they have let me change it for them, they have seriously said they don't see a difference. It's extremely frustrating that manufacturers have these settings turned on by default.

Quoted from ReadyPO:

And they may not release some of them again, or release them edited. Some are not PC now, so might be hard or impossible to get. Like an original Star Wars without the Lucas changes

Yup, this was the last format where the originals were officially released, aside from as un-remastered bonus material on an early DVD release. However, you can now get unofficial blu-ray versions known as the 'de-specialized editions' if you know where to look.

#41 68 days ago
Quoted from ReadyPO:

I'm a little unclear on this Disc Rot issue - are all Disc's susceptible to it, or just some (certain manufacturer's, etc.). If a disc doesn't have it by now, is it not going to get it? Can a Disc surface be polished to remove it?
Inquiring minds want to know ....

all disc are susceptible
there was one company that made disc that would go bad quick
but sometimes it was the title and the whole batch went bad (Star Trek the Wrath of Khan )
disc rot is inside the disc, not on the surface, I had a few that the two sides separated

#42 68 days ago
Quoted from ReadyPO:

I'm a little unclear on this Disc Rot issue - are all Disc's susceptible to it, or just some (certain manufacturer's, etc.). If a disc doesn't have it by now, is it not going to get it? Can a Disc surface be polished to remove it?
Inquiring minds want to know ....

As PopBumperPete said, all discs are susceptible to it, however it is generally uncommon. However, there were specific pressing plants that consistently put out bad discs. Sony DADC pressings are the worst offender with a very high percentage having rot. LDDB.com (Laserdisc Database) has a great database of user submitted rot reports. https://www.lddb.com/laserrot.php Sometimes rot is light and barely noticeable, and on the other extreme end, it can prevent the disc from playing. Laser rot is the oxidation of the reflective aluminum layer between the 2 halves of the disc. When it oxidizes, the laser is no longer reflected back to the sensor, so the data is "missing". In addition, early DiscoVision pressings are usually rotted or just plain garbage source material (Nasty pan and scan transfer). The transfer and pressing technology were still very early in development and clean rooms weren't very clean.

Ironically, the US release of Eraser (1996) is considered one of the worst rotters. It was pressed by Sony DADC.
https://www.lddb.com/laserdisc/09170/14202/Eraser (Database entry for pressing)
https://www.lddb.com/laserrot.php?id=9170 (Details on laserot for that specific release).

Every database entry has a rot status indication. The majority are "none reported" or "Low probability". The releases with major rot issues are marked as "High probability" or even "Avoid this release". However, you can get really lucky and find a rot free copy of a release that is marked as an "Avoid this release". I have at least 10-20 releases that are on the top 100 rotters list I linked above that have no rot whatsoever. Sometimes you get lucky with those. Sometimes a "rotten" release can be just one of the discs (since a decent number of releases have more than 1). So you get a second and piece together a complete rot free copy.

Final comment regarding laser rot. I think it is way overblown. Other than the couple of high profile rotters pressed by Sony DADC and DiscoVision pressings, it's not really that common. The discs can take a surprising amount of abuse. I have 1574 releases in my collection. That's not a disc count because some releases have 2 discs and box sets can have anywhere from 3-15 discs. Out of all of that, I have only 14 in my collection that are rotten. That's less than 1%.

1 month later
#43 37 days ago

I have 3 SAE systems. The only system I have a photo for is my 02 setup. Bi-amped bridged mono for 600 watts per channel at 8 ohms. The speakers are home versions of Altec Lansing Voice of the Theatre, model 19. The A1001 amp is 500 watts per channel at 8 ohms in another system.

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#44 37 days ago
Quoted from ReadyPO:

I'm a little unclear on this Disc Rot issue - are all Disc's susceptible to it, or just some (certain manufacturer's, etc.). If a disc doesn't have it by now, is it not going to get it? Can a Disc surface be polished to remove it?
Inquiring minds want to know ....

I have some early Discovision titles that suffered from rot. I actually own a Dragon's Lair disc from the arcade game that suffering from rot.

#45 37 days ago

Are video discs and laser discs the same? There's a RCA disc player with 37 movies up for auction next week. I was thinking of maybe framing a few for the movie wall if it stays cheap enough.

Few years ago I was offered 1500 discs for $100 but had no where to store them. Still kicking myself for not buying them and storing them in boxes till I had the room for them.

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#46 37 days ago
Quoted from dirkdiggler:

Are video discs and laser discs the same?

Totally different systems.
Cinematronics Dragon's Lair and Space Ace: Laser Disc.

Bally Midway Astron Belt: RCA Video Disc.

#47 37 days ago

I was a collector in the 90s. Consider myself a cinephile from a young age, I always hated cropped or “pan and scan” releases, so paying an arm and a leg (at the time) for laserdiscs was a thing. Still have my Pioneer player and a box of about 100 discs. Haven’t watched them in years but can’t bring myself to get rid of them.

I also still have minidiscs and a player!

#48 37 days ago

Apple TV, 75” Sony Z9d, and a high powered 7 speaker atmos is boobies. Just last night my daughter and next door neighbor watched the Taylor Swift long pond sessions and “reputation” tour concert and were mesmerized. Some vintage tech is cool af. Like pinball machines. Vintage mountain bikes are cool too IMO. I would also prefer vinyl albums as hobby over laser disks any day.

#49 37 days ago
Quoted from atpcfiaim:

I have 3 SAE systems. The only system I have a photo for is my 02 setup. Bi-amped bridged mono for 600 watts per channel at 8 ohms. The speakers are home versions of Altec Lansing Voice of the Theatre, model 19. The A1001 amp is 500 watts per channel at 8 ohms in another system.
[quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

Nice system!
Here is a pic of my equipment.
Lots of retro gear from legacy formats over the last 30 years.
Tascam pro cassette decks
Sony ES DAT decks
Two laserdisc players.
one which is hooked up to a meridian AC-3 demodulator to decode Dolby digital.
I’ve got about 150 laser discs. Don’t watch any very often but it’s nice to have the capability. Most of the obscure discs are finally available on DVD now.
I built a large closet next to my hone theater/stereo room the basement to store all my laserdiscs, Cd’s,cassettes,DVD’s ,DAT’s and Creature From the Black Lagoon collection.

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#50 37 days ago
Quoted from holminone:

Apple TV, 75” Sony Z9d, and a high powered 7 speaker atmos is boobies. Just last night my daughter and next door neighbor watched the Taylor Swift long pond sessions and “reputation” tour concert and were mesmerized. Some vintage tech is cool af. Like pinball machines. Vintage mountain bikes are cool too IMO. I would also prefer vinyl albums as hobby over laser disks any day.

Still have my 1988 Bridgestone Mb-4 mountain bike. People would ask me what it was when I first rode it. They hadn’t ever seen a MTN bike.

Back on topic I was very fortunate to have an amazing laserdisc store 20 min from my house back in the day. The owner was a fan of the format who had a very successful antique car parts company located in the same building. He brought in EVERY title released including all Adult and Japanese releases. The place was like candyland.
It was great being able to buy films and watch them in their original aspect ratio.
You could easily browse for an hour or two and not even realize the time passing by. I think it was called lasertown.

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