(Topic ID: 180269)

Announcing Stern SPIKE support for the Mission Pinball Framework


By jabdoa

3 years ago



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28
#1 3 years ago

Hi everyone,

today I'm happy to announce support for Stern SPIKE and SPIKE 2 systems in the Mission Pinball Framework (MPF). This is exiting news for the homebrew community because it previously was not easily possible to retheme SPIKE machines (Stern Wrestlemania and newer) without rewiring all switches and buying a new control system. Starting from today you will be able to reuse the existing Stern SPIKE CPU board to drive the machine. All you need to add is a PC (such as a Raspberry PI 3) and connect it via serial to SPIKE (either using native serial or a < $10 USB-serial converter). Additionally, you need to add the mpf-spike-bridge binary to the SD card of the game.

The SPIKE system consists of a CPU board and separate node boards which are connected by RJ 45 cables to the CPU. Using MPF you can control all switches, LEDs (including GI and RGB) and coils on the nodes. Furthermore, you can configure hardware rules for pop bumpers, slings and flippers. Finally, we also support the backbox backlight and the local switches on the CPU board (service and country code DIP switches).

Currently, not supported (because of limited serial bandwidth) are audio and the local DMD. However, multiple approaches to overcome this in the future exist. For now you can use a LCD connected to your PC, any RGB LED DMD or any LCD/DMD already supported by MPF. For SPIKE 2, we need to have a look at the LCD. Controlling further node boards with steppers, motors, mini LCDs, servos is straightforward once we got hold of such a node board.

All documentation including installation instructions can be found here: http://docs.missionpinball.org/en/latest/hardware/spike/index.html. Spike support is available in the current 0.33 Release of MPF.

Jan

#2 3 years ago

This is freaking cool!

Amazing work!

#3 3 years ago

Good and very fast work! Let me know when you're done with our boards – I might just use them for our second whitewood.

#4 3 years ago

I am both amazed and excited about this news. Can't wait to see and play the games that come from this. Way to go JABDOA.

#5 3 years ago

Sweet! Awesome work

#6 3 years ago

Would it be possible to load DMD data onto the SD card and just have the serial bus call it up by reference?

#7 3 years ago
Quoted from zacaj:

Would it be possible to load DMD data onto the SD card and just have the serial bus call it up by reference?

Oh now there's an interesting idea. Certainly that would be possible. However to really be useful, you'd have to be able to not just trigger frames and animations but also dynamic text and stuff. So that would require some kind of code component running on the CPU node that was more than just the bridge.

What's really interesting about this is this is already the exact architecture of MPF. MPF is two parts: the game engine which is like the MPF core which controls the hw and runs the game logic and everything, and then the media controller (MC) which handles all the graphics, displays, and sounds. (The two are connected via a simple socket protocol.)

The catch here is that MPF's MC requires OpenGL and a GPU which doesn't exist on the SPIKE CPU node, so running it there (at least with our current architecture is out). However I would guess that SPIKE 2 has a GPU, so maybe this is an option?

Actually what we first thought about for MPF was to just install and run MPF itself on the CPU node, but the SPIKE CPU node is not powerful enough. It's basically like a Raspberry Pi Model 1 but with less memory. (Which is fine for Stern of course since they built their code around the SPIKE hardware.)

Again SPIKE 2 might be different? Maybe we can just run MPF on the SPIKE 2 CPU node itself? Though for SPIKE 2 it wouldn't matter as much since we don't need the DMD and we can just use the HDMI port of the computer running MPF for the display.

Anyway, lots to think about and play with over the next few months.

Wolfmarsh suggested that we should build up some example configs for the SPIKE machines that are out there so you could just download a working base game and have at it. That would certainly be cool and make it easy for people to try out MPF!

#8 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

Oh now there's an interesting idea. Certainly that would be possible. However to really be useful, you'd have to be able to not just trigger frames and animations but also dynamic text and stuff. So that would require some kind of code component running on the CPU node that was more than just the bridge.
What's really interesting about this is this is already the exact architecture of MPF. MPF is two parts: the game engine which is like the MPF core which controls the hw and runs the game logic and everything, and then the media controller (MC) which handles all the graphics, displays, and sounds. (The two are connected via a simple socket protocol.)
The catch here is that MPF's MC requires OpenGL and a GPU which doesn't exist on the SPIKE CPU node, so running it there (at least with our current architecture is out). However I would guess that SPIKE 2 has a GPU, so maybe this is an option?
Actually what we first thought about for MPF was to just install and run MPF itself on the CPU node, but the SPIKE CPU node is not powerful enough. It's basically like a Raspberry Pi Model 1 but with less memory. (Which is fine for Stern of course since they built their code around the SPIKE hardware.)
Again SPIKE 2 might be different? Maybe we can just run MPF on the SPIKE 2 CPU node itself? Though for SPIKE 2 it wouldn't matter as much since we don't need the DMD and we can just use the HDMI port of the computer running MPF for the display.
Anyway, lots to think about and play with over the next few months.
Wolfmarsh suggested that we should build up some example configs for the SPIKE machines that are out there so you could just download a working base game and have at it. That would certainly be cool and make it easy for people to try out MPF!

I guess really I'd rather just have a guide to running custom code directly on the CPU myself. I'm more used to coding games on <100MHz processors with 2KB-2MB of RAM than on an rPi, and it seems that in this case the serial bridge is a bit of a hack to wrap MPF into a situation it's not completely suitable for. But they must have custom code running on the SPIKE, so why not just publish that interface too?

#9 3 years ago
Quoted from zacaj:

I guess really I'd rather just have a guide to running custom code directly on the CPU myself.

That would definitely be possible. You can look at the mpf-spike-bridge source and MPF's spike platform source and see how that works, and based on that you could write whatever you wanted just for this specific hardware. Since the SPIKE CPU node runs Linux, there are lots of options for how you could do custom code to run on the board directly. I'm excited to see what you come up with!

Quoted from zacaj:

It seems that in this case the serial bridge is a bit of a hack to wrap MPF into a situation it's not completely suitable for.

The homebrew community has taken the approach of separating the pinball control hardware from the game logic / game code hardware. This is why the P-ROC, FAST, and Open Pinball Project controllers don't include game processing elements on them. They control the pin hardware, and then you control them with whatever type of computer you want depending on your preferences and needs. (Big, small, fast, slow, mac, windows, etc.) It also means that the pin controllers can have a long shelf life (the P-ROC is 8 years old this year) and still be relevant since people can always use the latest computer to run their game code. This is the approach that MPF takes too and why the MPF SPIKE bridge works this way.

Stern, on the other hand, builds tens of thousands of boardsets where they know exactly when they will be used and exactly what code will be used. So in their case they can combine game processing and pin control on the same board.

What this MPF SPIKE bridge does is essentially turn the SPIKE CPU node into a P-ROC. The advantage of not running MPF on there is you're not limited by it. So a SPIKE v1 machine only has enough horsepower to run the game that Stern made at the time they made it. But if you're retheming that machine years later and you want to add an LCD or do all sorts of other things, you can do so since you're controlling it with whatever computer you want.

Another way to think about this is if you want to retheme or rewrite a 1990s WPC machine, you have two choices: FreeWPC or P-ROC.
FreeWPC is amazing and cheap because you don't need any new hardware, but you're limited to what the 1990s 6809 CPU could do with 1MB RAM and 8MB ROM, and you have to write your code in the language that can be compiled for it. P-ROC means you have to buy a P-ROC ($325) plus a computer to control it ($50-150), but on the flipside you can write your game code in whatever language you want and you can support HD LCDs and more lights and LEDs and surround sound and whatever else you can think of.

So that's the approach with the MPF SPIKE bridge. Separate the pin controller (SPIKE CPU node) from the computer that runs the game code (can be a $35 RPi 3) so that people can write code however they want without the limitations of the platform decisions Stern made when that game was new.

-1
#10 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

I'm excited to see what you come up with!

Just as soon as I buy a SPIKE game!

Quoted from BrianMadden:

The homebrew community has taken the approach of separating the pinball control hardware from the game logic / game code hardware. This is why the P-ROC, FAST, and Open Pinball Project controllers don't include game processing elements on them.

Personally, I think this is a horrible idea, hence why I don't use those boards at all. Being able to throw more horsepower at stuff is cool and all, but even the earliest pinball MPUs still have plenty of room to squeeze in some good code, you're limited more by how much the machine (just via inserts in this case) can communicate with the player (too complicated rules and they won't know what's going on). If I'm going to go to all the effort of writing a whole new game, I'd rather it be able to be played by more than the five people who happen to have a P-ROC lying around

#11 3 years ago

Guys can you speak in laymans terms for a minute because I've read your last few posts and my brains melting

Just a quick question but from what I gather and maybe I am wrong but does this mean I could take my BM66 and add assests that aren't in the factory code?

Thanks
J

#12 3 years ago
Quoted from J85M:

Guys can you speak in laymans terms for a minute because I've read your last few posts and my brains melting
Just a quick question but from what I gather and maybe I am wrong but does this mean I could take my BM66 and add assests that aren't in the factory code?
Thanks
J

You'd need to rewrite the entire game and redo all the art and sound.

...granted with the current state of the code that wouldn't take too long

#13 3 years ago
Quoted from zacaj:

You'd need to rewrite the entire game and redo all the art and sound.
...granted with the current state of the code that wouldn't take too long

So that's a yes? that's cool, I have friends in programming jobs. So to add just one mode it would require a complete rewrite? You couldn't just splice that little piece of code into the existing game?

Very cool and interesting this stuff, pinside constantly amazes me with the range of talents in this community.

#14 3 years ago
Quoted from J85M:

So to add just one mode it would require a complete rewrite? You couldn't just splice that little piece of code into the existing game?

Correct.

The code that ships on a game from Stern is in a form that is not human readable. So it's not really possible to edit or add to that unless you have the original "source" code that the Stern programmers wrote.

So instead what this thing does is it adds new code to the SPIKE pinball machine (which is on an SD card) which causes the machine to not load the original Stern code, but to instead let the pinball machine be controlled by a computer connected via USB, which then can have the code written on it by someone else (like one of your programmer friends).

There is a free and open source piece of software called "The Mission Pinball Framework" which helps people write their own pinball code which is the thing that we use, but the Stern SPIKE stuff we're talking about today could let someone write new code for a SPIKE machine in any computer language. They wouldn't have to use MPF.

So really this is an either/or thing. Either the original Stern code, or your own new code.

The reason we can't do both is because the original Stern code is locked up by Stern, we don't know how to make new code interact with it. So that's why we say that if you want to use this for your own code, you would have to write a complete game code from scratch.

#15 3 years ago
Quoted from zacaj:

If I'm going to go to all the effort of writing a whole new game, I'd rather it be able to be played by more than the five people who happen to have a P-ROC lying around

Agreed.

That's what's cool about this thing, that if you do go to all the trouble to rewrite a SPIKE game, you can give it to someone else and they can run it in their machine without needing a P-ROC. They could run it off their laptop just to try it out.

#16 3 years ago
Quoted from BrianMadden:

Agreed.
That's what's cool about this thing, that if you do go to all the trouble to rewrite a SPIKE game, you can give it to someone else and they can run it in their machine without needing a P-ROC. They could run it off their laptop just to try it out.

Or even better, just give them a file for the SD card

#17 3 years ago

Simply amazing stuff.
I have thought about something like this for years now.
Stunned to see it is real.

#18 3 years ago
Quoted from zacaj:

Or even better, just give them a file for the SD card

You could also run MPF on the CPU but you would have to cross compile Python3 for an ancient Linux distribution. But that would work without larger limitations. However our current media manager (MPF-MC) requires Opengl (because it makes things fast) which does not work on SPIKE. Nevertheless, you could implement a new media manager to achieve that (or port the old pre 0.21 one). Dmd would indeed work without. The reason why I'm not doing this is that it limits during development. It is easier to develop on a fast PC and tune the game for the target hardware later in my opinion (compress assets etc). But if you want we will certainly support you doing it.

Jan

#19 3 years ago

The benefits also are you don't have to build a game from scratch, the miles of wire, LED lights, and flipper parts are there for you to play with. Create the game YOU WANT and continue to play the old one.

#20 3 years ago

Congratulations on now supporting spike nodes. It is a testament to the open-ness of MPF and the correctness of the interface between MPF and hardware. Every different hardware platform that MPF supports proves out the design/interface decisions and makes it available to even more people. Mitch (of Moonwalking Dead fame) could now take his retheme to a whole new level and add animations to match the new theme. (Next time I bump into him, I will need to mention it).

I wondered how this would shake up the homebrew board market. (Ha, I just called homebrew pinball a market) Stern should be able to mass produce boards much more easily than nearly any other company. Luckily Stern nodes are wayyyy more expensive than currently available off the shelf boards. Stern node $220 for 8 solenoids, Fast 3208 $159, and PROC PD16 (16 solenoids) $100.

Top notch work on this Jan! Now, somebody can take a Wrestlemania and retheme it as My Little Pony (the ring is a corral you know) without the pain of rewiring the playfield.

#21 3 years ago
Quoted from openpinballproj:

Congratulations on now supporting spike nodes. It is a testament to the open-ness of MPF and the correctness of the interface between MPF and hardware. Every different hardware platform that MPF supports proves out the design/interface decisions and makes it available to even more people.

We actually learned a lot from SPIKE also. Some stuff in MPF will change in the near future and make it better for all platforms.

Quoted from openpinballproj:

I wondered how this would shake up the homebrew board market. (Ha, I just called homebrew pinball a market) Stern should be able to mass produce boards much more easily than nearly any other company. Luckily Stern nodes are wayyyy more expensive than currently available off the shelf boards. Stern node $220 for 8 solenoids, Fast 3208 $159, and PROC PD16 (16 solenoids) $100.

Those are the prices for replacements parts. Expect those to be about 500%-600% of the real retail price (typical replacement parts margin). So if Stern wanted to enter this market they would probably dominate it simply because they build those boards at scale. Also all Spike node boards support up to 64 inputs using the extension port (just attach a SPI shift register) and at least 64 LEDs (again via shift registers) which really is a lot more than the other boards. You could probably design a machine around two 8 driver nodes. The fact that Stern uses more boards underlines that those boards cannot be very expensive to produce.

Quoted from openpinballproj:

Top notch work on this Jan! Now, somebody can take a Wrestlemania and retheme it as My Little Pony (the ring is a corral you know) without the pain of rewiring the playfield.

Thanks. Not only WWE but all SPIKE games (http://www.ipdb.org/search.pl?searchtype=advanced&mpu=61) should work. We would like to hear feedback about other machines (see our support forum: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/mpf-users). There might be slight differences but those should be easy to work out. Same probably applies for SPIKE 2 machines.

Jan

#22 3 years ago
Quoted from zacaj:

really smart things

Quoted from BrianMadden:

more really smart things

Thank you zacaj & brianmadden for taking the time to reply and answer my questions

#23 3 years ago

This is utterly amazing. I wish I had more time so I could mess with this. If only I was born 20 years later.

#24 3 years ago

Awesome. Too bad I don't have a SPIKE game yet. TIME TO START LOOKING FOR THOSE CHEAPO WWEs and fixing the code, people!

#25 3 years ago
Quoted from Frax:

Awesome. Too bad I don't have a SPIKE game yet. TIME TO START LOOKING FOR THOSE CHEAPO WWEs and fixing the code, people!

We (the MPF Team) are happy to help you with that. Getting it flipping should be a matter of a few minutes. For WWE please be aware that the switch mapping in the manual contain some small mistakes but should be easy to figure out.

Jan

#26 3 years ago

Am I correct to assume that once a single MPF config file is done for the lamps, coils and switches that the portion of config for those bits could be shared by everyone using that game as a base game?

#27 3 years ago
Quoted from BrewinBombers:

Am I correct to assume that once a single MPF config file is done for the lamps, coils and switches that the portion of config for those bits could be shared by everyone using that game as a base game?

Yes. The YAML config file would work for any of that specific game.

#28 3 years ago
Quoted from jabdoa:

We (the MPF Team) are happy to help you with that. Getting it flipping should be a matter of a few minutes. For WWE please be aware that the switch mapping in the manual contain some small mistakes but should be easy to figure out.
Jan

*raise eyebrow*

Quoted from Frax:

Too bad I don't have a SPIKE game yet.

#29 3 years ago
Quoted from jwilson:

Yes. The YAML config file would work for any of that specific game.

Good idea. This can be mostly done using the manual only but should be verified on a real machine because there might be mistakes in the manual.

We would be happy to also host those files in our examples repository (https://github.com/missionpinball/mpf-examples). Additionally we would add a small unit test to make sure they also work with future MPF versions.

#30 3 years ago

We just uploaded a switch, coil and lights mapping for WWE Pro: https://github.com/missionpinball/mpf-examples/blob/dev/machine_templates/WWE_Pro/hardware.yaml

If you find more mistakes please tell us!

Jan

#31 3 years ago

Thanks to some feedback we fixed some minor bugs in WWE Pro and mapped the RGB LEDs. Futhermore, we now have an untested WWE LE mapping: https://github.com/missionpinball/mpf-examples/blob/dev/machine_templates/WWE_LE/hardware.yaml (contains an additional node board 12).

Jan

#32 3 years ago

(to follow)

#33 3 years ago

Just a small update before the weekend: We got Linux 4.4 running on the board. It initially ran 2.6.30 (Released 2009). We had some problems getting the memory chip properly adressed during the three stage boot process but can work around this in U-Boot now. Furthermore we mapped all hardware components in the Linux device tree which should be useful for other mods. We might be able to upstream the spike board support into the Linux kernel in the future. As a result we now have gstreamer and python 3.5 on the spike cpu which allows us to run MPF directly on the Stern MPU.

Next challenges include getting audio running in Linux 4.4 (works in 2.6.30) and figuring out how to run MPF media controller without OpenGL hardware. Additionally we want to enable usb client mode (like if you attach your mobile phone to a PC via USB) which would allow us to stream audio and DMD via mpf-spike-bridge as well (if you want to use a more powerful CPU during development).

Stay tuned for more updates in the next weeks.

Jan

2 months later
#34 2 years ago

I have a question about connecting a PC to a SPIKE machine. I have a GOT Premium, and the docs says to connect a USB-to-serial adapter to the CN2 (DBG0) header on the SPIKE board. So I have a couple of questions:

1. My GOT has a CN2 header, but it's labeled "DBGU" and not "DBG0". Is that the right header?
2. There's actually not a header there (see pic). Do I have to solder a header onto the board?
3. Is it not possible to communicate with the CPU board using the regular USB ports on the SPIKE board?

Basically, my question is, how do I connect the USB-to-serial adapter to the SPIKE board?

IMG_2195 (resized).JPG

#35 2 years ago

My Spike board had that header soldered. That is definitely the right one. DBGU is also the right name. Will fix that in the documentation.

It might be possible to use two USB serial cables as well but i did not try it and it would require some changes on the sd card.

Jan

#36 2 years ago
Quoted from jabdoa:

My Spike board had that header soldered. That is definitely the right one. DBGU is also the right name. Will fix that in the documentation.
It might be possible to use two USB serial cables as well but i did not try it and it would require some changes on the sd card.
Jan

Thanks for the reply. That's a bummer that I don't have a header there. Can you take a pic of yours so I know what it's "supposed" to look like?

#37 2 years ago

Should look like this one on Marcos: http://www.marcospecialties.com/pinball-parts/520-6936-00.

Jan

#38 2 years ago

I see how the MPK Spike Bridge replaces the original code for the machine, and allows communication over serial. Is there / was there ever a way to enable Serial communication (switch states, etc...) on the original game code? To essentially log game activity over serial?

#39 2 years ago
Quoted from thefunkpunk:

I see how the MPK Spike Bridge replaces the original code for the machine, and allows communication over serial. Is there / was there ever a way to enable Serial communication (switch states, etc...) on the original game code? To essentially log game activity over serial?

We cannot read the serial when the game is running because that would interfere with the game reading switches. So with our approach no you cannot do that.

However, you could connect directly to the bus with a RS485 transceiver and capture all data. Decoding the bus is a bit harder because you need to understand who is sending but this can be done (tried that). There are other approaches which use strace to get that data or poke in the game memory. Nevertheless, this is not the focus of MPF so we did not investigate this further.

#40 2 years ago
Quoted from pinball_happy:

Thanks for the reply. That's a bummer that I don't have a header there.

Mine too. I really, really, really don't want to try soldering a header onto that $470 board. My soldering skills are not that good. I'm bummed out. I was really getting juiced up to code a new version of KISS. If anyone figures out how to do this using the on-board USB ports please post the solution here!

Thanks Jan for this cool work you're doing.

#41 2 years ago

I just ordered another FTDI on Amazon. Will give it a try next week. Should work with little changes. I will let you know.

Jan

#42 2 years ago

Working through the tutorial and I have to say, that as a coder who sees terrible documentation all the time, your documentation and tutorial is some of the best written I've ever seen.

#43 2 years ago
Quoted from jabdoa:

We cannot read the serial when the game is running because that would interfere with the game reading switches. So with our approach no you cannot do that.
However, you could connect directly to the bus with a RS485 transceiver and capture all data. Decoding the bus is a bit harder because you need to understand who is sending but this can be done (tried that). There are other approaches which use strace to get that data or poke in the game memory. Nevertheless, this is not the focus of MPF so we did not investigate this further.

I really interested in what you learned there.

I started this topic several years ago:
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/stern-star-trek-reverse-engring-the-rgb-leds
but couldn't make heads or tails out of the bit stream.

#44 2 years ago
Quoted from jabdoa:

My Spike board had that header soldered. That is definitely the right one. DBGU is also the right name. Will fix that in the documentation.
It might be possible to use two USB serial cables as well but i did not try it and it would require some changes on the sd card.
Jan

Hi Jan! I really appreciate your help with this! I'm trying to figure out what you mean when you say two USB serial cables. Can you explain more what you mean by this? I know you said you need two FTDIs but I'm not sure how to set it up. The software part I can handle, it's the hardware that's tricky for me

#45 2 years ago

pinball_happy konjurer I tested this and it works fine. Furthermore, I extended the documentation to include the SD card change ( http://docs.missionpinball.org/en/latest/hardware/spike/mpf-spike-bridge.html) and how to wire this up (docs.missionpinball.org/en/latest/hardware/spike/connection.html).

For the Spike side it is important to have a real FTDI chip like an FT232 (common CP232 does not work). The PC side does not matter as long as it is working on your OS.

Jan

#46 2 years ago
Quoted from jabdoa:

pinball_happy konjurer I tested this and it works fine. Furthermore, I extended the documentation to include the SD card change ( http://docs.missionpinball.org/en/latest/hardware/spike/mpf-spike-bridge.html) and how to wire this up (docs.missionpinball.org/en/latest/hardware/spike/connection.html).
For the Spike side it is important to have a real FTDI chip like an FT232 (common CP232 does not work). The PC side does not matter as long as it is working on your OS.
Jan

Great news! Thanks for investigating this! I've ordered a couple FTDIs so hopefully I can get this working soon!

#47 2 years ago

What's a FTDI? I tried to look it up but I didn't find a clear answer.

I'm a coder and have some embedded programming experience but I have little knowledge of serial communication standards and workings.

#48 2 years ago

konjurer This is an USB-serial converter with a FTDI chip: amazon.com link »
But there are other ones too. Just make sure it says something like FT232RL or FTDI in the name. The other common chip is CP232 (probably a bit cheaper) but SPIKE is missing a kernel driver for it.

#49 2 years ago

I have some confusion. I believe I mistakenly thought that two FTDI interfaces might allow me to use the 2 USB ports on the SPIKE CPU board. This is NOT the case, correct?

It looks like my only option is a SINGLE FTDI board plugged into the header. And I will have to solder a header onto the SPIKE board if one doesn't exists (which it doesn't on my KISS). Am I understanding this correct?

Thanks again for doing this!

Tim

#50 2 years ago

No, you can connect two FTDIs to a USB-Serial + Serial-USB connector (see the picture). Just connect one USB to spike and the other to your pc. Then connect the serial sides.

IMG_20170511_201216 (resized).jpg

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