(Topic ID: 194496)

An EM Restorers First Bingo Restoration, Bally Sea Island - A Diary

By Pecos

6 years ago


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#1 6 years ago

On July 25th 2017 I saw a Craigslist ad for a bingo machine here in Tucson. Several had caught my eye months earlier but they were in Phoenix and they weren't the special kind of bingo that I was looking for. I had visited Las Vegas in the early 1980s, many a moon ago, and asked where I could find a bingo machine to play. I don't know where I had heard or seen bingo games, but, being a lover of any device mechanical, I wanted to play one. Even back then, they were hard to find. I had to ask several casino workers before I got the name of a casino that had bingos. I wish I could remember which casino we ended up at, but alas, the many casinos we visited are all a blur in the grey cell goo. The bingos were put in a small room right next to one of the entrances. It seemed like someone decided to put them in there as an afterthought, a way to use space that would have normally been wasted put to use to make cashola.

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I found a bingo that had a screen that could be used to choose different patterns to win. For those who don't know much about bingos, most work like a pinball game in that you get five balls and you can earn credits. That is where the similarities in the rules mostly end. The playfield has a number of holes that trap the ball as it falls down towards the bottom. There are no flippers. There are no pop bumpers or slingshots. The only interaction the player has with the ball is to shoot it in the general direction you want it to land, then to nudge the machine, without tilting the game, as the ball, with any luck and skill, falls toward the hole value that you want. But the bingo I played had another way to interact with the machine - and that is what I liked most about it over other bingo machines. A screen in the backbox could be moved allowing you to earn credits many more ways. Some bingos are limited to adding credits by only getting three or more balls in a row. On this bingo the screen could be moved to score in this way, but there were other odd patterns that would allow you to add credits. It varies by game, but with Sea Island you can move the screen up until ball four or ball five or even AFTER ball 5, with a little bit of luck. From what I've heard on Nicks BingoPodcast, you can even buy more balls. It's a good listen if you want to know more about how bingos and Sea Island work.

'Episode 308 - 1959 Bally Sea Island' - https://secure-hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/c/f/e/cfe9acb981844aeb/Episode_308_-_1959_Bally_Sea_Island.mp3?c_id=10677943&expiration=1501208325&hwt=6731f95341da300487f55ed11ffdee33

At some point, the screen is locked. Winning on a Bingo pinball is primarily dependent on your shooting skills, nudging skills, sheer luck, and astrological signs from above.

So, I liked this bingo and decided that if I were to ever own one, it would be one like this that I would purchase. When I saw the bingo for sale on Craigslist, that feature is the first item I looked for. The feature is called a 'Magic Screen', and there it was! The price was right and I knew the seller, David! It was a Bally! It was eight miles away! So I called and David and I set a time the next day to pick up the machine. The theme? The name? For the record, not that it really mattered to me, the theme is of an island in the sea and women, lots of women, and the name of the bingo is 'B - I - N - G - O.' Sorry about that, had to visit my childhood there for a moment. It is called 'Sea Island.'

While I have restored a number of Williams and Bally pinball machines, this is my first attempt at a bingo. I will be documenting my work. So, to be clear up front, I am not a bingo expert. I will be sharing my mistakes along with you, intrepid bingo restorer thread follower. I have this bad habit of starting the restoration of an EM pinball and then interrupting the work when a new pinball was paistakingly but lovingly hauled into Pecos' Palatial Pinball Parlour. Hmm, maybe I should think about changing that name to Pecos' Palatial Pinball and Bingo Parlour! Naw, it would mess up the alliteration! Anyway, I would be continuing my bad habits but events in the past month had already interrupted the work on my latest EM, a Williams Liberty Bell. So, I don't feel too bad about leaving ole Liberty behind, albeit temporarily.

I have developed a routine set of steps for restoring an EM pinball machine. First step, derust the legs, clean the bolts, install new leg levelers and put the cabinet up on the legs. I do this so I can test the EM in one piece up and on it's legs. But this was different. I wasn't going to be testing the mechs in this game for quite a while so no real need to put it back together up front. Besides, I was out of room here at Pecos' Palatial Pinball Parlour! Since almost all of the guts are in the backbox, that is where I would start. But first, what kind of goodies would I find in the coin box?

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Not much. David, great seller and all around good guy, told me about the key. I would be needing that. The plates for the leg bolts were not a good sign. Only one fuse? Hmmm.

80% of the work of restoring an EM is cleaning. Might as well clean the top of the backbox first. Is that bird poo on the top? Yuck! I used lots of blue glass cleaner on a paper towel and then wiped that crud off. I wasn't worried about using a water based cleaner. This had already seen water and the little bit I would put on wasn't going to hurt.

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Next I had to get the backbox door open. One lock was broken. I had to move the backbox around before the other lock could be opened. Inside awaited more EM stuff than I had ever seen in one place before. I took some pictures, always a good place to start.

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I used a wet Q-Tip to pick up the flakes of ink from the backglass. This was an exercise in futility since I knew I would never use them to touch-up the backglass. But, maybe some other poor fool would.

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The first issue I noted was some cut wires in the upper right of the backbox. Not a good start. I was relieved to find that these wires went nowhere. Whatever was attached to these wires on the top of the backbox was long gone.

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Where to begin with the mechs? My friend Ryan Claytor, elephanteater.com, would no doubt tell me 'one bite at a time!' I recognized three stepper units on the left side of the backbox. I'll start there! These are Step-Up/Reset steppers and manually moving the solenoid plungers showed that they both stepped-up and reset just fine. Nice surprise considering the age of these steppers. It's clever how Bally engineers used weights and gravity to make these steppers work. I'll clean them up a little, but unlike every EM pinball I restore, I will not be taking apart working mechs. There is just too much for me to fathom at this point so 'cutting a few corners' is necessary for me to maintain any belief at all that I can get this beast working again.

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These three stepper units had interesting names, Yellow Replay Counter, Red Replay Counter and Green Replay Counter. Ha! There are three sections on the Magic Screen with these colors! BINGO!

What had I gotten myself into? I kept telling myself that this was just like an EM pinball, only gargantuan sized. But who was kidding who? There were motors and chains and stuff in here that, not only had I never seen before, I had no idea what these parts did. So, I begin my ominous quest into the bowels of one of the most complicated mechanical computers ever built. You are welcome to follow along in my journey! There are no guarantees that I will ever get this machine working, but I am going to try.

Bally 'Sea Island' was made in January 1959, just one year and four months after my birth day, the only birthday that really matters! Only 700 were made.

This is not a how-to. It is a diary. Please read through all of the postings before using any of these techniques and then only use them at your own risk!

You may ask 'Why is he doing this?' You may ask and I will answer. I want as many of these old marvelous mechanical machines brought back to life and played by others as possible. It's a part of Americana. If a young teenager out there gets half as much fun playing the old EM pinball and bingo machines as I did, then I will have achieved my goal. I hope that someone who may be reticent about trying to purchase and restore one of these old bingos will be tempted to do just that after reading about my experiences. Perhaps, that might even be you!

End of part 1.

#2 6 years ago

Here are some pics of Sea Island as posted on Craigslist. I call them my 'Day 1 Pics.' Credit to David, the seller and all around good guy.

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#3 6 years ago

That cable at the top was added - dig it all out and toss it.
You'll be able too tell where the added wires stop and the factory stuff is.
I see at least one added coil - leads me to believe it may have had an added bonus counter (maybe).

Maybe just start off by rebuilding one stepper at a time ...

#4 6 years ago

Sea Island was my first magic screen game I ever own and played. I was brought up playing 6 card bingo pinball machines and had never seen one before my purchase and studied Russ Jensen "Inside your Bingo". I found this information very helpful as a foundation to learning about all the mechanical units and their operation, before I started my attempt to get the beast up and running .....http://www.pinballcollectorsresource.com/russ_files/inside.html

You are heading in the right direction by cleaning things up first and wiping off the heavy dust and checking out mechanical units manually etc. Make sure there are all 8 balls in the game before trying to start a game after your clean up and mechanical inspection without them nothing will work.

It's always great to hear about a newcomer interested in finding a bingo pinball machine to restore and get working.
Your going to love it!

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#5 6 years ago

I got a chance to start digging into this and the stepper units were at the top of my hit list. The three stepper units on the left of the backbox worked okay. The stepper in the top middle of the backbox was, however, not resetting to home position. This gives me a chance to show you how I clean a stepper unit.

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Spider side.

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As you can see, it was pretty dirty!

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After removing the parts, the stepper base is cleaned. The solenoid sleeves can be replaced, but for steppers I clean them with a Q-Tip. It is important to clean the posts thoroughly. The armatures pivot on these posts and must move freely. I use a cotton pad and 91% Isopropyl alcohol to clean these.

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The parts travel to my kitchen sink. I don't recommend using the family kitchen sink if you want to clean your second stepper unit parts!

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I use a toothbrush, Gain dish washing detergent and Bon Ami. I make a small pile of each and dip the wet toothbrush into each then clean, clean clean!

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The clean parts go on a paper towel to dry. This method doesn't do a very good job cleaning off old grease and oil. To remove that gunk, I use Q-Tips and Isopropyl alcohol.

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I cleaned the spider by hand with a Q-Tip and Isopropyl alcohol. I marked the top position with masked tape and I didn't want that to get wet and fall off. I see a problem with this spider. It is missing the grounding tab, or whatever Bally calls it - I think. I am used to seeing the tab and it is missing on this spider?

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Perhaps it is okay. This picture is from a spider found on a Bally Double-Up pinball and - no tab.

At this point, I apply a very thin layer of SuperLube on the rivets on the spider side and put the spider back on. But I won't be doing that until I figure out if I need a new copper grounding tab piece, or whatever Bally calls it.

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Here it is put back together, all nice and shiny again!

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I started doing some cleaning and found what appears to be one, maybe two loose wires. I hate it when that happens! One wire appears to have been removed and wrapped around the others. Oh yeah! This is going to a fun game to fix!

#6 6 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

ound what appears to be one, maybe two loose wires.

Wow! You found the one Magic Screen game with the score extra step unit intact.

This unit has a coil which will hold in, allowing multiple steps of a score unit. It is not a frequent award, but the operator stacked the deck against the player a little bit. Why not pull in a couple nickels extra?

The entire extra step unit, coil, switch, everything is typically removed (including the relay in the upper right of that pic), so resolder that one wire and you'll be back to factory...

wait. There's the snake wire up there, too. Not sure if that also went to the same bare solder tab that I see beside the loose wire.

It's not critical for operation of the game, but it is a pleasant surprise when you get the extra step award.

Also note: the yellow, red and green score steppers handle the odds on the backglass - the zero position on most of the units is extremely critical, especially on the replay counter units (there are separate steppers for red, green, and yellow of these as well).

You'll have this thing up and running in no time.

#7 6 years ago

Following this so hard!!! Good luck, Pecos!

#8 6 years ago

Just a short update this time. I was playing Airborne Avenger and just had to do a shop job on it when the ball got stuck during a great ball. Fun game and brings back memories!

Here is a pic (OT and PG in the basement) for those who might be interested:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/anyone-else-see-a-pattern-in-this-airborne-avenger-playfield-pg#post-3892301

I have made more progress than I expected at this point. All six stepper units in the backbox are working! One had to be taken apart and cleaned. Four worked 'as is' and one was cleaned in place.

I purchased a Dremel 443 1/8" Carbon Steel Brush. My mother, bless her, had given me a Dremel Tool Set and it is time to put it to good use. If ever a machine screams for the 'Magic Brush' treatment, this is it!

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This is Nic's method for cleaning contacts and rivets:
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/1972-bally-space-time-not-working-worth-the-restoration/page/2#post-3744309

I've seen this before so I was prepared for it:

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Bally fuse holders are notorious for their lousy ability to hold fuses! Ha! No wonder there are no fuses in the left two spots.

I found the 'tab' on the spider that I was looking for so that stepper has been reassembled. Only it wasn't on the spider but the stepper unit. The rivet PCB had to be adjusted. The rivets weren't centered under the spider and several of the rivets had been partially worn to the PCB.

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I have identified the following units in the backbox:

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The Control Unit appears to me to be similar to the Score Motor in an EM pinball with a giant stepper disc attached to the end. To be truthful, it would scare me without the disc. But with it... YIKES!

I did some cleaning. With all of the dust, grease, oil?, in this machine, I will be going through more than one big bottle of 91% Isopropyl alcohol on this one. Filthy!!

#9 6 years ago

I'm in on this one.
Perhaps it will perk my interest in pulling my Bally Showtime bingo project out of the deep freeze & get started on it. Can't wait for the mixer rebuild, should be entertaining (?)

#10 6 years ago

Oh yes, sorry, forgot that the tab was a question.

The unit that is not labeled below the magic screen unit and above the control unit (stepper) is the extra ball unit.

You mention that the control unit has a stepper on the end - this is not quite true. It is a continuous wipe unit, but the wiper are only released upon pull off the search magnet (by shooting at least four balls and pressing r on the footrail). There is a similar unit called the spotting disc on the end of the mixer unit on the backdoor.

Both the control unit and mixer units are clutch-driven. In this way multiple timing functions can be run from a single motor.

#11 6 years ago

Well, well, well. The saga continues. And well I am not.

With the steppers working in the backbox, it was time to move on to the next obvious target of cleanliness improvement. There is a bank of relays on the right side of the backbox and relays I know. That is what I would work on next! These were even labeled!

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This isn't the first mud dauber nest I have found.

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The relay bank was attached with two big screws. Those were removed so I could get easier access to both levels of the double-stacked switches. I also had to desolder two wires to another relay above the relay bank.

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This is the back side of the relay bank. Now I could get to those switches to try, for the first time, the Magic Brush. First, though, the contacts and switches had to be cleaned with Isopropyl alcohol and Q-Tips. My first go with the Magic Brush was a bust. I found it hard to put the fast spinning brush in between the contacts. I tried opening the switch with a small regular screwdriver and only turning on the Dremel after the brush had been inserted between the contacts. I would turn on and turn off the Dremel as necessary. This seemed to work reasonably well. I will say this, the contacts are now bright and shiny! And then the switches were adjusted.

Now, for the first problems found and created. There are THREE problems shown in this picture. Do you see them?

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For those of you who don't feel like playing search and find games:

1. A broken switch.
2. A broken ladder, caused by me. I needed to push on the ladder to close and adjust the switches and it snapped like a green bean! I barely touched it! Honest! I now have two relays to take apart and fix. I hate it when that happens. One step forward and two steps back.
3. A user added wire. I plan to take these out when/if I can figure out what they were supposed to do.

There were two other relays on the right side. Remember that I had to remove two wires? The two wires to this coil were the ones that I had to remove to get access to the relay bank. Then there was this. Two wires missing to the switches! I hate it when that happens!

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The other is a latch/trip type relay that I have seen on Williams EMs for the Game Over relay. Could this be a Game Over relay? This relay had four wires attached to it that didn't look factory to me.

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It took a while to sink in, it always does when I am swamped with so much new information, but it appeared that the same wire was attached to both of these relays. In fact, the top relay was slowly beginning to look quite funky. It had a user added wire. The screws didn't match. The coil wrapper was funny looking. Ergo, this is a hack!! No need to worry about missing wires on this relay or resoldering the wires onto the coil! One problem solved.

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It, too, will be removed when I trace all of these wires that look like they came from someone's living room lamp! It's hard enough trying to figure out what Bally designed and built without having to worry about a bunch of hacks.

#12 6 years ago

Relay labeled 'hack' is indeed!

The trip/latch relay is also not factory.

Those fiber relay armatures are VERY easy to break. Bingo folks have been using a dremel to clean switches for a very long time, but I would think that the brush that Nic espouses would cause some problems unless you take the entire relay apart. Using a standard wire wheel is a bit easier fit. But then you have problems caused by a wire wheel... life is full of tradeoffs!

The fiber armatures break so easily because they get hot. In that bank are two relays that are almost constant duty. The heat makes the fiber plate brittle.

Be very cautious moving forward and plan to disassemble the relays should you choose to clean aggressively. The dirt on that trip/latch shows that you might need to be that aggressive.

You DO have shiny contacts. So there's that!

#13 6 years ago

Also: when questioning whether something is factory or not, reference your manual (located on the right side of this page) http://bingo.cdyn.com/machines/bally/sea_island/

The manual for bingo pinballs list each grouping of relays as well as isolated relays to aid the technician in locating and troubleshooting.

The schematic provides the wiring diagram and logical function, but the manual is incredibly helpful as it details switch-for-switch function within each relay. Using both is key to troubleshooting (which I realize you are a bit away from attempting).

#14 6 years ago
Quoted from Pinball_Muggle:

That cable at the top was added - dig it all out and toss it.

Done! There will be more digging out of wires to come.

Quoted from Pinball_Muggle:

I see at least one added coil - leads me to believe it may have had an added bonus counter (maybe).

Was this one of the coils/relays that I and bingo noticed as non-factory or another?

Quoted from Pinball_Muggle:

Maybe just start off by rebuilding one stepper at a time ...

You read my mind!

Quoted from Vic_Camp:

Sea Island was my first magic screen game I ever own and played. I was brought up playing 6 card bingo pinball machines and had never seen one before my purchase and studied Russ Jensen "Inside your Bingo".

Cool pic Vic and interesting to know that Sea Island was your first magic screen bingo. Thanks for the information! It is help like this that I will be needing to get this monster working again.

Quoted from Vic_Camp:

Make sure there are all 8 balls in the game before trying to start a game after your clean up and mechanical inspection without them nothing will work.

Important information noted for future reference. If my math is correct, that means that you can 'buy in' up to three balls.

Quoted from Vic_Camp:

It's always great to hear about a newcomer interested in finding a bingo pinball machine to restore and get working.

I think I lost my mind somewhere on the way to pinball nirvana!

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Wow! You found the one Magic Screen game with the score extra step unit intact.

Lucky me! I'll take it!

Quoted from bingopodcast:

This unit has a coil .... LOTS OF GOOD INFO REMOVED...
Also note: the yellow, red and green score steppers handle the odds on the backglass - the zero position on most of the units is extremely critical, especially on the replay counter units (there are separate steppers for red, green, and yellow of these as well).

Thanks for this. It help when the diagnosing of problems rear their ugly heads. Plus, it is good to start learning how all of these parts interact.

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Following this so hard!!! Good luck, Pecos!

Thanks Ryan! Glad to have you here.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

The unit that is not labeled below the magic screen unit and above the control unit (stepper) is the extra ball unit.

Thanks! I will add that to the diagram.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

You mention that the control unit has a stepper on the end - this is not quite true. It is a continuous wipe unit, but the wiper are only released upon pull off the search magnet (by shooting at least four balls and pressing r on the footrail). There is a similar unit called the spotting disc on the end of the mixer unit on the backdoor.
Both the control unit and mixer units are clutch-driven. In this way multiple timing functions can be run from a single motor.

Fascinating! Wiper, got it. Clutch, not got but will get.

Quoted from dasvis:

I'm in on this one.
Perhaps it will perk my interest in pulling my Bally Showtime bingo project out of the deep freeze & get started on it.

Perk your interest or convince you to sell the bingo. I'm hoping the former, but the story doesn't have a happy ending yet. Glad to have you aboard the bingo bus! Take a front seat.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

The trip/latch relay is also not factory.

Good to know. Something else to remove.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Those fiber relay armatures are VERY easy to break... The fiber armatures break so easily because they get hot. In that bank are two relays that are almost constant duty. The heat makes the fiber plate brittle.

I see that the coil wrapper has been burned off and the fiber has turned a shade darker so that makes sense.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Be very cautious moving forward and plan to disassemble the relays should you choose to clean aggressively. The dirt on that trip/latch shows that you might need to be that aggressive.

I will. Thanks for the caution. It wasn't the cleaning that broke the fiber piece, it was simply moving it to the closed postition to test for make/break gaps in the switches.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Also: when questioning whether something is factory or not, reference your manual (located on the right side of this page) http://bingo.cdyn.com/machines/bally/sea_island/

A manual?? I thought I was going to have to do this without one. Super Awesome! Thanks!

#15 6 years ago

Alan, are you aware that the entire light board can be unlatched and folded down on top of the playfield for easy access to the areas you are working on? If not, pull the glass out. There are two latches at the top right and left.
Just checking as I don't see the light board down in your photos.

#16 6 years ago
Quoted from DennisDodel:

Alan, are you aware that the entire light board can be unlatched and folded down on top of the playfield for easy access to the areas you are working on? If not, pull the glass out. There are two latches at the top right and left.
Just checking as I don't see the light board down in your photos.

Dennis, he's working on it separated from the body of the game. I was not advising him to do that because it might either unbalance the head or damage the hinges/wood where the light board is hinged.

#17 6 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

A manual?? I thought I was going to have to do this without one. Super Awesome! Thanks!

Yes, the manuals are actually really fantastic. There are still bits and bobs which don't appear in there, but they are so extremely detailed compared to flipper games... try it, you'll like it!

#18 6 years ago
Quoted from bingopodcast:

Dennis, he's working on it separated from the body of the game. I was not advising him to do that because it might either unbalance the head or damage the hinges/wood where the light board is hinged.

I think he is likely to keep busting up things working in those close quarters. I would just make sure everything is secure to keep the head from tipping (pushing the head up against a wall or something like that) and lay down the light board on something to keep it level when it is lowered.
Better yet, put the game together and work on it upright on legs. Is he working inside the head with it being on the floor? My back would be shot in a few minutes working that way!
I think you'll see more busted ladders etc. doing it with the light board up. SO much easier to get to things with the board down. Just my opinion of course.

#19 6 years ago

100% agree - if you have the space to set it up it'll make the work easier.

#20 6 years ago

Hey Pecos - something doesn't look right from the pic you posted - just went back in to look.

There's a stepper mounted on the right interior wall of the head - beside the Magic Screen unit. What the heck is that? Is it labeled?

Doesn't look factory. Bally never mounted stuff like that.

Here's a photo of a more stock game from Phil's site: http://bingo.cdyn.com/machines/bally/sea_island/resources/int-sea_island-2.jpg

No stepper!

Again, I'm talking about the one directly behind the replay register.

#21 6 years ago
Quoted from DennisDodel:

Alan, are you aware that the entire light board can be unlatched and folded down on top of the playfield for easy access to the areas you are working on? If not, pull the glass out. There are two latches at the top right and left.
Just checking as I don't see the light board down in your photos.

Nope, not aware. I know squat about bingos. I don't even know how the backglass comes out. My backbox is literally falling apart so I was able to get it out. I was able to fold down the light board - much easier to get to some of those parts. Thanks for bringing it up.

The backbox is on the floor in the room with the air conditioner. I don't have a problem with it on the floor as long as I stay off my knees. If I can find a better place to put it I will need some help moving it. I wouldn't try moving one of these backboxes even if I was 30 years younger.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Hey pecos - something doesn't look right from the pic you posted - just went back in to look.
There's a stepper mounted on the right interior wall of the head - beside the Magic Screen unit. What the heck is that? Is it labeled?

Silly me, I thought that WAS the Replay Register! I see now that the Replay Register is the counter for credits/replays.

Here are some pics for you. It looks like the stepper is part of the same hack job:

DSCF2946 (resized).JPGDSCF2946 (resized).JPG

DSCF2945 (resized).JPGDSCF2945 (resized).JPG

DSCF2947 (resized).JPGDSCF2947 (resized).JPG

If you look closely, you will see some numbers on the stepper unit - 36 24 --- 4 6 8 16 20 50 75 --- 40.

#22 6 years ago

The numbers on the stepper coincide to the numbers in the manual (page 35) showing which circuit is active to score the proper number of replays. If you're interested in another restoration going on now, check the Carnival Queen thread in the EM bingos forum. I go slowly but some stuff you see may be of interest.

#23 6 years ago

okorange is correct, that's the normal purpose of one of those units, but that's a repurposed replay counter unit - at specific intervals, a signal was sent -somewhere- up above to do -something-.

No idea what, but a good indicator it was an auxiliary counter or siren or alarm or bell or something.

Also, that terminal strip up there - not factory. They really picked an awkward spot to mount that stepper - I wonder why? Things that make you scratch your head.

If it was just to tie into the number of replays won, there's at least one better way to do that - requires a couple more wires, but would be much cleaner and remove the need for a stepper. At least this way is easier to remove!

#24 6 years ago

It looks like it could be an aftermarket '5 games for a quarter' setup that a lot of operators did to their games here in the Midwest. A quarter would start a game and the unit would add four more games to the replay register. Saves on having to count so many nickels, plus, a quarter is less likely to jam the coin mech.
There were a couple of different ways to accomplish the '5 plays for a quarter' change, but this looks like the one I remember seeing the most.

#25 6 years ago

Working my way through the backbox mechs, it seemed like the next obvious focus of attention was the Control Unit. It is really filthy. It looks like someone put White Lithium Grease on the cams. I know about this stuff because my dad had some of it. But I have never found a use for it and avoid it like the plague when lubing the very few parts needing it on an EM machine. The entire Control Unit was covered in grime and grease.

DSCF2966 (resized).JPGDSCF2966 (resized).JPG

DSCF2965 (resized).JPGDSCF2965 (resized).JPG

DSCF2970 (resized).JPGDSCF2970 (resized).JPG

DSCF2968 (resized).JPGDSCF2968 (resized).JPG

Those two copper pipes are interesting. They look like some kind of steam pipes! That is a silly notion, but what are they? I am guessing that they are there to add oil to the motor - can't think what else they could be.

DSCF2969 (resized).JPGDSCF2969 (resized).JPG

This Control Unit looks an awful lot like a pinball Score Motor. I always rotate the cams in the Score motor. It is the only way that I know of to check the switch gaps. But turning the cams on the Control Unit was not so easy. I carefully turned the fan on the end to rotate the cams, making sure that it was rotating in the right direction. It took a while, I am not good at details, but I finally noticed that only the far rightmost cams were turning. I think I am about to discover the mystery of the clutch:

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Both the control unit and mixer units are clutch-driven. In this way multiple timing functions can be run from a single motor.

My room smells like Isopropyl alcohol! Cleaning this is time consuming and somewhat frustrating, I can only clean for a few hours before I start going batty, but it must be done. I can't imagine that the switches worked with so much grease, gunk and grime on them. I am not done yet, but I am making progress.

DSCF2976 (resized).JPGDSCF2976 (resized).JPG

I want to send out special thanks to Dennis for the parts he sent. I was excited to see what was sent - awesome stuff! I will be more excited when I can put the parts and cards on the playfield, but there is much to do before I can experience that. Thanks Dennis!

Oh yeah, almost forgot. Can someone tell me what the words are on the label under the Control Unit that is titled 'Important.'

#26 6 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

Oh yeah, almost forgot. Can someone tell me what the words are on the label under the Control Unit that is titled 'Important.'

IMPORTANT
"Do not use white lithium grease"

#27 6 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

They look like some kind of steam pipes! That is a silly notion, but what are they? I am guessing that they are there to add oil to the motor - can't think what else they could be.

You're right! They are bearing fill tubes. Use 3-in-1 in the blue and white can (motor oil) to fill.

Quoted from Pecos:

I think I am about to discover the mystery of the clutch:

Yup. There are coils underneath the control unit - dividing it into three distinct sections.

a) turns all the time
b) only turns when a coin is inserted
c) only turns when you are winning credits.

The search disc would spin all the time if it weren't for the search disc magnet on the bottom of the search disc, holding it latched until you press the R button.

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