(Topic ID: 336448)

Amazon deal on soldering station $25

By kvan99

1 year ago


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    There are 69 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    11
    #1 1 year ago

    Good deal on a decent soldering iron....

    Price Drop. Amazon has the Tilswall 65W Soldering Station w/ Smart Temperature Control for a low $25.20 Free Shipping after Coupon Code: "N5U3RMHA" (Exp 5/14). This is originally $80, so you save 69% off list price.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07XF3TK82/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1

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    #2 1 year ago

    The promo code isn't working.

    #3 1 year ago
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    #4 1 year ago

    If you Amazon search for just the iron (Tilswall 65W), and don't use the link above, there's a 50% discount coupon option (only shows up in Checkout, not Cart)

    pasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).png

    Not sure about replacement tips.

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    #5 1 year ago

    I have this soldering station. Works very well, gets plenty hot for any board work or playfield work. At $25, I might get a second one as a backup.

    #6 1 year ago

    Thanks for that price hard not to get as backup

    #7 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    If you Amazon search for just the iron (Tilswall 65W), and don't use the link above, there's a 50% discount coupon option (only shows up in Checkout, not Cart)
    [quoted image]
    Not sure about replacement tips.[quoted image]

    Got it for $30. Thanks!

    #8 1 year ago

    Sounds like a decent price if you don't want to pull the trigger on a Hakko

    #9 1 year ago
    Quoted from WalrusPin:

    Sounds like a decent price if you don't want to pull the trigger on a Hakko

    Tough decision, Weller or Hakko. Couldn’t decide which was better. Went with the Weller solder station and am very pleased.
    Think I paid about $120.

    Purchased the $29 Tilswall, too good to pass up.

    #10 1 year ago
    Quoted from ElectroMagnetic:

    Tough decision, Weller or Hakko. Couldn’t decide which was better. Went with the Weller solder station and am very pleased.
    Think I paid about $120.
    Purchased the $29 Tilswall, too good to pass up.

    I use the Hakko FM 203, since I can run 2 irons simultaneously and an FR 301 for desoldering work.

    I still have my 30 year old Weller professional that I use on the go. Done a couple of tips and one heating element over the years, but parts for that are sadly no longer obtainable.

    #11 1 year ago

    Do the cheap ones lose heat intermittently? I was trying to build a rectifier board this weekend and some joints would flow perfectly and others seemed like I just couldn't get hot enough.

    #12 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Do the cheap ones lose heat intermittently? I was trying to build a rectifier board this weekend and some joints would flow perfectly and others seemed like I just couldn't get hot enough.

    It's possible. Remember that whatever you are coming into contact with is basically a heat sink, so the station has to be able to keep up. My Hakko certainly heats up and maintains much faster than my old Weller.

    #13 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Do the cheap ones lose heat intermittently? I was trying to build a rectifier board this weekend and some joints would flow perfectly and others seemed like I just couldn't get hot enough.

    Ground plane, sucked away all your heat. Iron couldn't keep up.

    #14 1 year ago
    Quoted from smalltownguy2:

    Ground plane, sucked away all your heat. Iron couldn't keep up.

    I was thinking that might have been a possibility too, but more along the lines of using too small of a tip. Other possibility that might have aggravated the problem was using lead free solder which has a higher melting point.

    #15 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    If you Amazon search for just the iron (Tilswall 65W), and don't use the link above, there's a 50% discount coupon option (only shows up in Checkout, not Cart)

    Bought it as well. My total was $32.39

    #16 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I was thinking that might have been a possibility too, but more along the lines of using too small of a tip. Other possibility that might have aggravated the problem was using lead free solder which has a higher melting point.

    Here is the failure in question. Some joints came out okay and others were just a total disaster. I kept going after deciding it was a lost cause, mostly just out of curiosity. Same technique on each joint, some flowed some refused. Also, I put in a couple of the fuse holders backwards, didn't know they had a front and back. They are really tough to line up anyway, only half ended up gapped out correctly. I was using one of the smaller tips, that probably was part of the problem.

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    #17 1 year ago
    Quoted from WalrusPin:

    I use the Hakko FM 203, since I can run 2 irons simultaneously

    What's the value of 2 simultaneous irons? Big tip and little tip without having to cool down and swap tips?

    #18 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Same technique on each joint, some flowed some refused.

    Looks like all the ones that gave you trouble are connected to the copper ground plate, these can really pull the heat away from the joint fast if the iron cant regulate the tip heat.

    #19 1 year ago
    Quoted from Pin_Guy:

    Looks like all the ones that gave you trouble are connected to the copper ground plate, these can really pull the heat away from the joint fast if the iron cant regulate the tip heat.

    Makes sense, I'll try to reflow with this new iron when it gets here. I have a built rectifier board coming tomorrow so this one is unfortunately just for practice now. Those fuse holders are really tough even if I got everything else right anyway.

    #20 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Here is the failure in question. Some joints came out okay and others were just a total disaster. I kept going after deciding it was a lost cause, mostly just out of curiosity. Same technique on each joint, some flowed some refused. Also, I put in a couple of the fuse holders backwards, didn't know they had a front and back. They are really tough to line up anyway, only half ended up gapped out correctly. I was using one of the smaller tips, that probably was part of the problem.[quoted image]

    What tip are you using? Wattage of iron?

    What solder are you using (i.e. lead free or 60/40 or 63/37), rosin core?

    #21 1 year ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    What's the value of 2 simultaneous irons? Big tip and little tip without having to cool down and swap tips?

    Yes, I did a lot more work with arcade pcb repair and CRT chassis rebuilds before coming over to the pinball side. It can be helpful to have a chisel tip for standard work and a fine point for more intricate detail. Also you can run irons at different temperatures and the second port can support suction as well (they sell a daughter expansion unit that allows for that). However, I just use the FR 301 for any desoldering and it's worth every penny.

    #22 1 year ago
    Quoted from WalrusPin:

    Yes, I did a lot more work with arcade pcb repair and CRT chassis rebuilds before coming over to the pinball side. It can be helpful to have a chisel tip for standard work and a fine point for more intricate detail. Also you can run irons at different temperatures and the second port can support suction as well (they sell a daughter expansion unit that allows for that). However, I just use the FR 301 for any desoldering and it's worth every penny.

    Also helps if you need to have heat on both sides of the PWB (i.e. stubborn via or too much ground plane on both sides).

    #23 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    What tip are you using?
    What solder are you using (i.e. lead free or 60/40 or 63/37), rosin core?

    Here is my iron with now rusty tip. 60/40 rosin core solder.

    20230508_172336 (resized).jpg20230508_172336 (resized).jpg
    #24 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Here is my iron with now rusty tip. 60/40 rosin core solder.[quoted image]

    That rusty tip isn't helping any. Looks like the iron itself is 60w which should be enough.

    #25 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    That rusty tip isn't helping any. Looks like the iron itself is 60w which should be enough.

    It was a brand new tip pre-debacle. I think I wasn't getting the whole pad hot enough and the tip was too small along with the iron not being able to keep up. I have no idea why the tip rusted.

    -1
    #26 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    It was a brand new tip pre-debacle. I think I wasn't getting the whole pad hot enough and the tip was too small along with the iron not being able to keep up. I have no idea why the tip rusted.

    It's not rust, it's a tip that got excessively hot and damaged the plating on the end. Does the solder have rosin in it?

    Sorry for the perpetual questions!

    Edit: oops - you mentioned it was rosin core, sorry.

    #27 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    It's not rust, it's a tip that got excessively hot and damaged the plating on the end. Does the solder have rosin in it?
    Sorry for the perpetual questions!
    Edit: oops - you mentioned it was rosin core, sorry.

    That also makes sense because I turned it all the way up when I couldn't get it flowing.

    #28 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    That also makes sense because I turned it all the way up when I couldn't get it flowing.

    When you change the tip, using a damp sponge really helps to keep the tip clean (my Weller tips can last well over a year). Then adding a little solder after a swipe or two on the sponge - helps to maintain the plating on the end.

    On the board itself, while the traces are pretty wide - that tip should do a pretty decent job. The wide swaths of groundplane copper - nope. You can also sort of place the tip somewhat horizontal to help get the heat into the pad a little better.

    Looking at the soldering - looks like not much rosin, lead free solder (you said 60/40), or not enough heat.

    With some good 60/40 solder w/rosin and the right temperature - it should flow like butter.

    #29 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    When you change the tip, using a damp sponge really helps to keep the tip clean (my Weller tips can last well over a year). Then adding a little solder after a swipe or two on the sponge - helps to maintain the plating on the end.
    On the board itself, while the traces are pretty wide - that tip should do a pretty decent job. The wide swaths of groundplane copper - nope. You can also sort of place the tip somewhat horizontal to help get the heat into the pad a little better.
    Looking at the soldering - looks like not much rosin, lead free solder (you said 60/40), or not enough heat.
    With some good 60/40 solder w/rosin and the right temperature - it should flow like butter.

    Thanks for these tips, I'll practice tomorrow. I think this board was just a tough one for a novice, good learning experience though. I actually thought I was getting decent with the iron there for a minute, which is why I took this on. Back down to earth.

    #30 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Thanks for these tips, I'll practice tomorrow. I think this board was just a tough one for a novice, good learning experience though. I actually thought I was getting decent with the iron there for a minute, which is why I took this on. Back down to earth.

    Make sure that you are tinning the tip before and after you solder. Otherwise you will prematurely ruin it with oxidation

    #31 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Also, I put in a couple of the fuse holders backwards, didn't know they had a front and back. They are really tough to line up anyway

    Before you solder in the fuse holders, install the fuses (even old blown fuses work). It will keep the holders perfectly aligned...then solder.

    #32 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    Before you solder in the fuse holders, install the fuses (even old blown fuses work). It will keep the holders perfectly aligned...then solder.

    this is a great tip. Thank you .

    #33 1 year ago

    Use a wide chisel tip for more heat transfer. I would solder a rectifier board around 790 F. More heat for less time is better than less heat for more time, and the large ground plane should not be a detriment to the solder flow.

    Those ground plane connections you showed all solidified prematurely as you were trying to flow the solder; this doesn't happen with the higher heat transfer.

    #34 1 year ago
    Quoted from slochar:

    Use a wide chisel tip for more heat transfer. I would solder a rectifier board around 790 F. Those ground plane connections you showed all solidified prematurely as you were trying to flow the solder; this doesn't happen with the higher heat transfer.

    Thanks for the tips @slochar. Should I be able to get the solder that is already solidified on those connections to flow using this method or will I need to remove it first?

    #35 1 year ago
    Quoted from JethroP:

    Before you solder in the fuse holders, install the fuses (even old blown fuses work). It will keep the holders perfectly aligned...then solder.

    This is a great tip, I thought of using the correct fuses after the damage was already done but clever to use old blown fuses.

    #36 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Thanks for the tips slochar. Should I be able to get the solder that is already solidified on those connections to flow using this method or will I need to remove it first?

    Yes, you can reflow.

    #37 1 year ago

    Ordered! Thanks for the tip. My old iron was on its last legs.

    #38 1 year ago
    Quoted from sullivcd40:

    Thanks for the tips slochar. Should I be able to get the solder that is already solidified on those connections to flow using this method or will I need to remove it first?

    Adding some rosin flux will help the reflow. If you add extra solder since it has rosin in it, you might end up w/too much solder and need to remove the excess (quality solder wick helps). But you'll need to make sure you're getting the temperature right too.

    #39 1 year ago

    Code isn't working for me either after using the supplied link -

    #40 1 year ago

    looks like that code isnt working anymore

    #41 1 year ago

    Quite often the incredibly cheap tools are worth their price... if you want cheap and good you need to buy both

    #42 1 year ago
    Quoted from Tuukka:

    Quite often the incredibly cheap tools are worth their price... if you want cheap and good you need to buy both

    I usually buy cheap, then good, followed by better, finally best...meaning I would have saved money just by getting the best (or maybe a 'better') in the first place.

    #43 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I usually buy cheap, then good, followed by better, finally best...meaning I would have saved money just by getting the best (or maybe a 'better') in the first place.

    Some tradesmen I know have told me "buy once, cry once."

    #44 1 year ago
    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I usually buy cheap, then good, followed by better, finally best...meaning I would have saved money just by getting the best (or maybe a 'better') in the first place.

    My buddy was always good at that. When we were younger he "blew" about 10 grand on a Denon receiver, cd player, and some cherry wood Klipsch speakers. That was probably over 20 years ago and still going strong.

    #45 1 year ago
    Quoted from Tuukka:

    Quite often the incredibly cheap tools are worth their price... if you want cheap and good you need to buy both

    Quoted from mbwalker:

    I usually buy cheap, then good, followed by better, finally best...meaning I would have saved money just by getting the best (or maybe a 'better') in the first place.

    Quoted from smalltownguy2:

    Some tradesmen I know have told me "buy once, cry once."

    Quoted from pinzrfun:

    My buddy was always good at that. When we were younger he "blew" about 10 grand on a Denon receiver, cd player, and some cherry wood Klipsch speakers. That was probably over 20 years ago and still going strong.

    You guys are mentioning cheap stuff... Is this soldering station junk to begin with?

    I thought it was "cheap" because of the massive discount that was only available for a short time not because it was a bad product.

    #46 1 year ago
    Quoted from mrm_4:

    You guys are mentioning cheap stuff... Is this soldering station junk to begin with?
    I thought it was "cheap" because of the massive discount that was only available for a short time not because it was a bad product.

    It’s like the age old quote “you get what you pay for”.

    Will it work? Sure I assume. Will it do a great job? Don’t know, better than others, worse than others.

    I’ve been using the Tenma 21-1590 for over 10 years, and it does an awesome job. Pair that with my 808 Hakko desoldering, and I’ve been able to attack what I’ve needed to.

    End of the day, it comes down to your technique. Know your iron’s limits/restrictions, and work around it. Don’t be afraid to add a small bit of fresh solder, to make it easier and cleaner, when removing the old stuff.

    #47 1 year ago
    Quoted from SterlingRush:

    It’s like the age old quote “you get what you pay for”.
    Will it work? Sure I assume. Will it do a great job? Don’t know, better than others, worse than others.
    I’ve been using the Tenma 21-1590 for over 10 years, and it does an awesome job. Pair that with my 808 Hakko desoldering, and I’ve been able to attack what I’ve needed to.
    End of the day, it comes down to your technique. Know your iron’s limits/restrictions, and work around it. Don’t be afraid to add a small bit of fresh solder, to make it easier and cleaner, when removing the old stuff.

    I get the "you get what you paid for" this is an $80 kit normally. When i search soldering kit in Amazon like 100 of them are anywhere from 50-100, except for one thats $300 which has a built in time machine.

    If you find an $80 product on sale, that doesnt mean youre buying junk, unless the kit is ACTUALLY junk. Is this kit junk for $80? Saying its junk because it had coupon code for $25 isnt a fair assessment. All the reviews are in the high 4s and 5s.

    #48 1 year ago
    Quoted from mrm_4:

    I get the "you get what you paid for" this is an $80 kit normally. When i search soldering kit in Amazon like 100 of them are anywhere from 50-100, except for one thats $300 which has a built in time machine.
    If you find an $80 product on sale, that doesnt mean youre buying junk, unless the kit is ACTUALLY junk. Is this kit junk for $80? Saying its junk because it had coupon code for $25 isnt a fair assessment. All the reviews are in the high 4s and 5s.

    Today it's priced at $40+20% coupon. Regardless of the list price ($80), I'd still consider this a $30-$40 soldering iron.

    I mentioned in an earlier post my biggest concern (with any iron, just not this one) would be if they use a non-standard tips since that is a consumable item. Next up would be the heater itself. Tiswall states:

    "...you can easily buy these tips online or hardware store, this is the standard size, for us, as this soldering station is new released, it's already come with 5pcs free tips, so we don't sell extra separate tips at current time. But we will check if we need to launch extra tip replacement set to meet most of customers' requirements."

    But one answer to a question elaborates:

    Q: Replacement tips available?
    A: genuine oem hakko tips will not fit the tilswall correctly. while they will fit on the ceramic element, they will bottom out and not reach the thin flared out support tube. thus, all tightening pressure will be on the ceramic element rather than the support tube. this is exacerbated by thermal expansion. exposed element length = 25mm -- hakko tip internal barrel depth = 24mm.

    So I can't just zip over to the local hardware store and buy tips apparently.

    Will it work? Sure, I've soldered for over 50 years - as long as the tip plating is OK, it gets to the proper temperature - it will work fine. There's other inexpensive irons that state they are compatible w/Hakko or Weller tips, I'd probably go that route.

    #49 1 year ago

    The usual problem with those inexpensive solder stations is the very small thermal mass of the soldering tip. Sure, it gets hot enough, but if you try to solder/desolder larger parts such as rectifiers, thick cables to coil solder lugs or parts connecting to ground plane of PCB, the tip loses temperature very fast. Result is a cold joint, or if desoldering, not all solder melts. Trying to compensate by raising the temperature only results in burned out tip.

    I have no experience on the Amazon station, of course it might be better than the cheapies. Try before you buy would be a good approach - but not very easily achieved.

    For most PCB work, it is probably OK. But then I recommend to buy a butane powered soldering iron with the money saved, to help with the tougher jobs. They have plenty of heat reserve available, and also nice to have in your toolbox for field work.

    #50 1 year ago
    Quoted from mrm_4:

    I get the "you get what you paid for" this is an $80 kit normally. When i search soldering kit in Amazon like 100 of them are anywhere from 50-100, except for one thats $300 which has a built in time machine.
    If you find an $80 product on sale, that doesnt mean youre buying junk, unless the kit is ACTUALLY junk. Is this kit junk for $80? Saying its junk because it had coupon code for $25 isnt a fair assessment. All the reviews are in the high 4s and 5s.

    Other than quoting what I quoted, I’m not sure where you got the rest of that from my post, but ok.

    It will probably do better than some irons out there, and not as well as others. There’s no bs in that statement.

    There are 69 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.

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