(Topic ID: 167758)

After changing lamps to led, system is overheating


By MFdePaulaJr

3 years ago



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  • 16 posts
  • 10 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by MFdePaulaJr
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#1 3 years ago

Guys, a little help here...

After I changed the lamps to LED my system is overheating . I do not know if it's a coincidence or is the LED lamps. Any idea ?

I've a mix of Led and regular lamps.

overheating

Playfield

Led lamp

#2 3 years ago

You have more than one line burned up on that connector. The original bulbs did it, not the LEDs.

LTG : )

#3 3 years ago

Yep, problem is not the LEDs, it's the connector.

#4 3 years ago

Thanks guys for answer me.

I'll replace the conector.

When the machine is turned on, it's impossible to touch on that conector.. very hot... but all bulbs (GI, insert) are working.

#5 3 years ago

For note...

Sega uses a 9 Positions Connector IDC (Insulation Displacement Connector).

#6 3 years ago

You should replace the header pins on the board as well at the connector. Yes it is a PITA but there is a bigger problem. The build up of residue from the burning acts as insulation on both sides. This means increased resistance and therefore more draw of current. The old Ohms law thing where the increased resistance and in Power in the form of heat.

#7 3 years ago

If you keep turning on the machine and running it, you risk more problems with the PCB. Replace the pins and connector ASAP. If you burn through the pin insulation plastic you will have burnt traces, more repairs, and more woes.

#8 3 years ago

Use LEDS in the GI and that will never happen again.

#9 3 years ago
Quoted from Taxman:

You should replace the header pins on the board as well at the connector. Yes it is a PITA but there is a bigger problem. The build up of residue from the burning acts as insulation on both sides. This means increased resistance and therefore more draw of current. The old Ohms law thing where the increased resistance and in Power in the form of heat.

Excellent explanation. I ordered a new header pin and connector from Marco. Thank you.

Quoted from xTheBlackKnightx:

If you keep turning on the machine and running it, you risk more problems with the PCB. Replace the pins and connector ASAP. If you burn through the pin insulation plastic you will have burnt traces, more repairs, and more woes.

I agree. I disconnected GI connector from PCB to avoid any other problems.

Quoted from mikat11:

Use LEDS in the GI and that will never happen again.

My next step! 101% Led!

#10 3 years ago

May I found the real problem... but I don't know how I gonna fix yet..

IMG_4082 (resized).jpg
these cables that come from transformer are really hot after a couple minutes...

IMG_4083 (resized).jpg
I disconnected and connect the plugs ... the yellow cables are "cold" now.. but the another cables continues to get hot.

#11 3 years ago

Well, a lot of current is running through them - each lamp uses .25A of power. Those connectors are 20 years old at least, they probably could use a good cleaning.

#12 3 years ago

You **could** have a bad LED or lamp socket that is partially shorting out.

You **need** to replace both the male and female connectors of that burnt one.

You **need** to check that the the GI fuses are the correct value, and not larger than specified.

#13 3 years ago
Quoted from Taxman:

The build up of residue from the burning acts as insulation on both sides. This means increased resistance and therefore more draw of current. The old Ohms law thing where the increased resistance and in Power in the form of heat.

The "old Ohms law thing" says I = E/R; adding series resistance to a circuit (i.e., between a connector pin and its header pin) would *decrease* current flow (assuming constant supply voltage).

#14 3 years ago
Quoted from jadziedzic:

The "old Ohms law thing" says I = E/R; adding series resistance to a circuit (i.e., between a connector pin and its header pin) would *decrease* current flow (assuming constant supply voltage).

The reason having resistance in the connector increases heat buildup is a little more complicated. Power disappated by a resistor is calculated by the formula P = I * V, where I is the current and V is the voltage drop across the resistor. The voltage drop is what's critical here, because the lower the resistance, the lower the voltage drop. So especially on something like the GI line where you have several amps running through it and very little resistance (because the bulbs are all in parallel, and multiple resistive loads in parallel have a lower effective resistance), adding one small point of resistance on the line can cause a lot of heat buildup.

-1
#15 3 years ago
Quoted from Piratedan200:

The reason having resistance in the connector increases heat buildup is a little more complicated. Power disappated by a resistor is calculated by the formula P = I * V, where I is the current and V is the voltage drop across the resistor. The voltage drop is what's critical here, because the lower the resistance, the lower the voltage drop. So especially on something like the GI line where you have several amps running through it and very little resistance (because the bulbs are all in parallel, and multiple resistive loads in parallel have a lower effective resistance), adding one small point of resistance on the line can cause a lot of heat buildup.

I don't see the words "heat buildup" anywhere in my post, do you? I responded to the (incorrect) statement that increased resistance in a connector would result in increased current flow, when in fact the opposite results. With "E" (the output of the transformer) constant increasing "R" decreases "I".

Yes, the degradation of the contact surfaces will result in increased *heat* dissipated by the contacts as you noted.

#16 3 years ago
Quoted from jwilson:

Well, a lot of current is running through them - each lamp uses .25A of power. Those connectors are 20 years old at least, they probably could use a good cleaning.

I bought a contact cleaner today. Now, all system is cold again. Thank you.

I've a "never touched" Sega goldeneye... For the very first time I'll replace 2 connectors and 1 transistor (blow today.... Q42 - 19N06L) It's ok for 20 years of use.

Quoted from vid1900:

You **could** have a bad LED or lamp socket that is partially shorting out.
You **need** to replace both the male and female connectors of that burnt one.
You **need** to check that the the GI fuses are the correct value, and not larger than specified.

Sockets: Ok !

Fuses: Ok ! 5v

Male and Female connectors: I ordered on Marco... Will take almost 1 month to arrive in Brazil

PS: your playfield restauration guide are amazing ! Thanks.

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