(Topic ID: 249525)

Advice For Early Solid State Owners


By oldschoolbob

59 days ago



Topic Stats

  • 125 posts
  • 28 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 34 days ago by Coyote
  • Topic is favorited by 49 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 41 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    08520072_Defect (resized).jpg
    Molex_Top_Counterfeit_Bottom (resized).JPG
    Molex_Loose_Counterfeit_Chain (resized).JPG
    DSC08528 (resized).JPG
    DSC08527 (resized).JPG
    DisneyWorldChippedCup (resized).jpg
    08520125_Mugshots (resized).jpg
    MJnPnVZm (resized).jpg
    IMG_2404a (resized).jpg
    IMG_2460a (resized).jpg
    IMG_2456a (resized).jpg
    IMG_2441a (resized).jpg
    IMG_2454a (resized).jpg
    IMG_4666 (resized).jpg
    Electricity explained (resized).jpg
    DSCN5386 (resized).JPG

    There are 125 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 3.
    16
    #1 59 days ago

    I read many threads here about problems people are having with their early SS games. It seems like most of the problems are connector related. I am NOT a tech-pro but I have re-built over a dozen Stern – Bally and Williams games. To insure you have a solid and lasting game you must make sure you have good voltages and connectivity throughout the entire game. You could just replace a faulty part or connector and get the game working again but down the road some other connector will fail and you’re back to the workbench.

    My method is nothing new – it’s covered on Pinwiki as well as several other sites. I suggest going to those sites for more detailed information.

    First you must have reliable voltages. This starts with the rectifier board. I remove the entire transformer and rectifier board as a unit and work at the bench. In some games they’re mounted on a plywood base in the bottom of the cabinet – others on a metal bracket in the back-box. The original bridge rectifiers are undersized and must be replaced. Also replace the header pins – don’t just re-flow the solder. They’re old and probably burnt. Inspect the high voltage diodes and ceramic resistors. If they look suspect replace them now. It’s easy with the unit out. Also look at the fuse holders and replace if they look discolored or corroded. Check that they hold the fuse firmly. Replace if necessary. Lately I’ve been replacing the entire board – nvram. weebly.com has both kits and assembled boards at a reasonable price. After the re-build I check the voltages at the bench by connecting line voltage to J2 pin 6 and 7. Then check the output voltages at the test points. Take into consideration that nothing is connected. Next replace all the crimp connectors on J1, J2 and J3. This is very important but often overlooked. You’ll never have good connections with 30 year old connectors.

    p01 (resized).JPG

    p02 (resized).JPG

    Next is the driver/regulator board. Replace all the header pins. Be careful removing the old headers – the solder pads are very fragile. (I just saw a thread with good tips on removing headers). Next replace the 5 volt capacitor (C 23) and the high voltage capacitor (C 26) Also add the ground and 5 volt mods as in Vid’s guide Bally/Stern driver board repair. Inspect for any burnt or damaged components – replace as necessary. Check the back side for any damaged traces. Again replace ALL the crimp connectors. J1 and J5 only have a couple of wires connecting to them. I usually add a couple of extra crimp connectors to the empty pins with no wire attached. This will help keep the connector seated. Install the board and connect J3 only. Check the voltages – they should be pretty close to specs at this time. Be careful with TP2 and TP4 – These are high voltage.

    p03 (resized).JPG

    p04 (resized).JPG

    Next is the MPU. This board is subject to a lot of corrosion. First remove the battery then thoroughly inspect everywhere for corrosion. Remove the socketed IC’s. Check the IC’s and sockets for any corrosion. Replace if necessary. Also check under the solder mask. Corrosion can live under there and you can’t see it. If it looks suspect scrape or sand the solder mask to be sure. You must clean all the corrosion or it will come back. There are several methods for removing corrosion so I won’t get into that here. After a thorough cleaning and inspection you need to replace the battery. There are several methods to replace the battery (NVRAM, remote battery, coin cell, etc.) Again, replace all the headers and crimp connectors. J5 is a 32 or 34 pin connector. I find it easier and not too much more expensive to replace the entire cable. GPE and Weebly Nvram both have replacement cables. Install the board and connect J4 only. Now check TP2 = 11.9 VDC, TP5 = 5 VDC, TP3 = 21.5 VDC.

    p05 (resized).JPG

    p06 (resized).JPG

    The lamp driver board is mounted just below the MPU and sometimes it will get corrosion from the MPU above so a close inspection is necessary. After inspection and cleaning, replace all headers and crimp connectors. A faulty SCR will seldom show any damage. But they will show up in the lamp test after the game is all back together.

    p07 (resized).JPG

    Next is the sound board. Replace all headers and crimp connectors and look closely at the capacitors. Replace any that show bulging on the top.

    p08 (resized).JPG

    Last are the displays. For some reason they are usually really dirty. Remove the connector on the back and slide them out the front. Be careful with the plastic angle bracket holding the glass in place and be careful with the glass. Usually a good cleaning with an air hose and a soft brush is all it takes to clean them up. Then replace the headers and crimp connectors. Some of the connectors get two wires in each connector because they are dazey chained. It’s a little tricky but you can do it. You may have some trouble with some numbers or segments out but those will only show after the game is on and you run through test mode. There is a good article on Pinwiki on repairing displays.

    p09 (resized).JPG

    p10 (resized).JPG

    p11 (resized).JPG

    By following these steps you’ve eliminated 90 percent of your problems and will have a good running game for another 30 years.

    If you have any suggestions, comments, or tips please add them below.

    #2 59 days ago

    I think the big problem for most is that the connectors are almost impossible to find. My globetrotters has 25 and 28 pin connectors...tough

    Then if you can find the right connectors it’s quite tedious and fraught with difficulty to wire them up. I redid some of mine 3 times and I still think one of the pins isn’t making a connection on one

    #3 59 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    I think the big problem for most is that the connectors are almost impossible to find. My globetrotters has 25 and 28 pin connectors...tough
    Then if you can find the right connectors it’s quite tedious and fraught with difficulty to wire them up. I redid some of mine 3 times and I still think one of the pins isn’t making a connection on one

    Reuse the old connector housings there's no reason to replace them unless they are the IDC type as in the newer older games.

    The other issue you will get better with practice.... it helps to have a quality crimper. The Yellow handled Waldron is "ok" for a pin or 2, but for mass repinnings a good ratcheting one is a must and makes it so much easier to get good crimps.

    #4 59 days ago

    Mark, Like slochar said I reuse the old housings unless they are damaged. Just replace one connector at a time. (remove one connector - cut it off - crimp on new connector - put it back in the housing) You'll notice in the photo above that I mark the empty connectors before I start. This helps me remember to skip that slot when I put them back in.

    IMG_3164 (resized).JPG
    #5 59 days ago

    Forgive my ignorance, but how does one know what size crimp connectors to buy? I replaced a rectifier board in a Quicksilver last night, but it came with new connectors and new connector housings which took the guesswork out of the process.

    #6 59 days ago
    Quoted from johnboy1313:

    Forgive my ignorance, but how does one know what size crimp connectors to buy? I replaced a rectifier board in a Quicksilver last night, but it came with new connectors and new connector housings which took the guesswork out of the process.

    Connectors are either 0.100" or 0.156"(larger). Smaller 0.100" connectors in Sterns are the salmon colored connectors. Take a salmon connector of a board, and do the same for a white connector. You'll see the size difference between the pins. In the attached video the host shows you how to crimp new connectors, a great ratcheting crimper that you can buy on Amazon, and part numbers for crimps and molex connectors that you can buy from Great Plains Electronics. I apologize in advance for the hosts nasty fingernails.

    #7 59 days ago

    it’s not as easy as you make it sound. Removing the connector from a housing without damaging the housing is tricky, cutting the wire, crimping a new pin receptor and getting it back in solidly is not easy.

    #8 59 days ago
    Quoted from oldschoolbob:

    I usually add a couple of extra crimp connectors to the empty pins with no wire attached. This will help keep the connector seated.

    Great tip - and another great write up.

    #9 59 days ago

    Thank you OP for posting about this. As a repair novice who is always trying to be a better tech these are the posts I look for and favorite.

    Quoted from bluespin:

    Connectors are either 0.100" or 0.156"(larger). Smaller 0.100" connectors in Sterns are the salmon colored connectors. Take a salmon connector of a board, and do the same for a white connector. You'll see the size difference between the pins. In the attached video the host shows you how to crimp new connectors, a great ratcheting crimper that you can buy on Amazon, and part numbers for crimps and molex connectors that you can buy from Great Plains Electronics. I apologize in advance for the hosts nasty fingernails.

    Can confirm. I ordered this crimper after this watching this video a while ago and it's great. The wire cutter and stripper are also good as I ordered them too.

    Quoted from mark532011:

    I think the big problem for most is that the connectors are almost impossible to find. My globetrotters has 25 and 28 pin connectors...tough
    Then if you can find the right connectors it’s quite tedious and fraught with difficulty to wire them up. I redid some of mine 3 times and I still think one of the pins isn’t making a connection on one

    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong as I'm not very familiar with early solid state electronics but I believe Great Plains Electronics carries these size connectors?

    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=68

    #10 59 days ago
    Quoted from bluespin:

    Connectors are either 0.100" or 0.156"(larger). Smaller 0.100" connectors in Sterns are the salmon colored connectors. Take a salmon connector of a board, and do the same for a white connector. You'll see the size difference between the pins. In the attached video the host shows you how to crimp new connectors, a great ratcheting crimper that you can buy on Amazon, and part numbers for crimps and molex connectors that you can buy from Great Plains Electronics. I apologize in advance for the hosts nasty fingernails.

    That looks a lot like the crimper I already have and used on the rectifier board last night. Thanks for the sizes of the connectors. That should make them easy to track down.

    #11 59 days ago

    I generally replace housings as well. When I disconnect the old housing I cut off enough wire to show the color and I keep it as a reference for what wires go into what slot. I generally don't replace header pins unless, for some reason, they don't beep out during continuity tests. I always reflow solder at minimum and replace header pins only when necessary. Same with housings. If when connected to the board, and it doesn't beep out to the back of the solder joint, then I replace the crimp and the solder.

    Good tips in the original post otherwise.

    #12 59 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    Removing the connector from a housing without damaging the housing is tricky

    Any job is easy with proper tools. This is but one example of removal tools, this one may or may NOT fit your connectors, is to be used as a guide only.

    https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/molex/0011030044/WM9918-ND/210947

    pasted_image (resized).png
    #13 59 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    it’s not as easy as you make it sound. Removing the connector from a housing without damaging the housing is tricky, cutting the wire, crimping a new pin receptor and getting it back in solidly is not easy.

    Maybe I'm use too working with older automotive computer connectors but I had no problem pulling apart the three connectors for the bridge board last week without damaging anything using nothing more than an exacto knife. Not that hard to depress the tab, hold it and then and apply pressure to remove. I crimped and soldered a few wires without any problem. Solder is not required but I always believe in going the extra mile on high load pins even though the machine was converted to LED.

    #14 59 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    it’s not as easy as you make it sound. Removing the connector from a housing without damaging the housing is tricky, cutting the wire, crimping a new pin receptor and getting it back in solidly is not easy.

    Plus the old plastic can be brittle. Since most of the hard work is recrimping, which you're doing *anways*, I just replace everything.

    #15 59 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    it’s not as easy as you make it sound. Removing the connector from a housing without damaging the housing is tricky, cutting the wire, crimping a new pin receptor and getting it back in solidly is not easy.

    That's where the practice and experience comes in. A lot of it comes down to the tools you get though, if you have crap tools, it's just going to be an exercise in frustration for you. I have the same blue handled crimper oldschoolbob does (as well as the yellow handle waldrons), but I use a small jewelers' screwdriver to get the pins out. That's the biggest pain. I made crap connections for years before I got the right tools.

    Quoted from Coyote:

    Plus the old plastic can be brittle. Since most of the hard work is recrimping, which you're doing *anways*, I just replace everything.

    Sure, when the housings are easily available. The .100 bally ones don't usually get too brittle or hammered though and I've saved a bunch of them from parts playfields from years past. .156 connectors I always use new ones it's just faster than extracting the pins ones at a time.

    #16 59 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    it’s not as easy as you make it sound. Removing the connector from a housing without damaging the housing is tricky, cutting the wire, crimping a new pin receptor and getting it back in solidly is not easy.

    You're talking about reusing the old housing. I'm talking about removing the receptor from the old housing, cutting the receptor off the wire, attaching a new receptor to the wire, and inserting the receptor in a new Molex connector. The Ops point was that by replacing the connector and recetor, not just the receptor, you are improving the connection from the connector (new) to the pins on the board, solving 90% of the provblems with these early solid state pins. The old IDC connectors are; 30+ years old, and an older technology than the newer molex connectors which give a better connection to the boards.

    Since you are already removing the receptor from the connector, and reinstalling the receptor, why not replace the connector with a new one for less than a dollar?

    #17 59 days ago
    Quoted from bluespin:

    I'm talking about removing the receptor from the old housing, cutting the receptor off the wire, attaching a new receptor to the wire, and inserting the receptor in a new Molex connector.

    Uh, stupid question:
    If you're going to cut off the pin ('receptor'?) from the wire, and then put a new pin onto the wire and put the new pin into a new housing, why bother removing the old pin from the housing? A small pair of snips, just snip the wire at the housing. Saves you.. a couple steps?

    #18 58 days ago
    Quoted from Coyote:

    Uh, stupid question:
    If you're going to cut off the pin ('receptor'?) from the wire, and then put a new pin onto the wire and put the new pin into a new housing, why bother removing the old pin from the housing? A small pair of snips, just snip the wire at the housing. Saves you.. a couple steps?

    I think he just got a little ahead of himself.

    But regardless whether you use a new connector or not, it's a good idea to snip a good 3/4" off the end of the wire, as they tend to get brittle from age/heat over the years. You can feel the difference in the flexibility between the tip with the pin and further down the wire.

    #19 58 days ago

    Curious who makes the rectifier board you show in Post #1 of this thread?

    #20 58 days ago
    Quoted from CUJO:

    Curious who makes the rectifier board you show in Post #1 of this thread?

    $32 for a kit, or $52 for assembled
    https://pinside.com/pinball/market/shops/1055-nvramweeblycom/01123--new-bally-stern-rectifier-board-as-2518-18-ta-100

    #22 58 days ago

    Actually I bought one of those rectifier boards from Weebly about a month ago and it works great!
    Mine just looks a lot different that the one posted.

    #23 58 days ago
    Quoted from CUJO:

    Actually I bought one of those rectifier boards from Weebly about a month ago and it works great!
    Mine just looks a lot different that the one posted.

    I bought one this past winter, it didn't have those big ass heat sinks. Those may be aftermarket

    Actually, mine had 3 bridges, and I dont think it had the big sand resistor. Maybe that's a Stern thing.

    #24 58 days ago
    Quoted from pinzrfun:

    I bought one this past winter, it didn't have those big ass heat sinks. Those may be aftermarket

    I have heat sinks on the left and center bridge rectifiers. Bought it assembled.

    #25 58 days ago
    Quoted from Atari_Daze:

    Any job is easy with proper tools. This is but one example of removal tools, this one may or may NOT fit your connectors, is to be used as a guide only.
    https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/molex/0011030044/WM9918-ND/210947[quoted image]

    I think the best tool to use when removing a .100 size connector from their housing is the Molex Extraction tool, #11-03-0022. Been using mine for a little over ten years and wouldn't be without it, probably used it to remove well over a thousand crimp pins. Only drawback is that it is a small tool and can be easily misplaced. Available from Great Plains Electronics for $17.50

    One other thing, if you are going to operate any classic Bally/Stern, be sure to use the high heat crimp pins for the rectifier board, and don't forget that there are two different wire sizes for the .156 pins and you will use both of them.

    When I see pics of high priced classic games with all original connectors, I just shake my head. It always makes me wonder what else didn't get addressed.

    #26 58 days ago

    This is great information. Can someone easily list the basic parts needed & the tools required to make this job easier? I need to do this myself in a couple weeks. Rather not buy all the molex connectors, receptors, etc from multiple sites. Where is the best place to source everything?

    Like this kit?

    https://www.marcospecialties.com/pinball-parts/CKBLY

    #27 58 days ago

    Go to Great Plains. They have the pins, connectors, crimpers and the tool to get the pins out.

    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/categories.asp

    #28 58 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    it’s not as easy as you make it sound. Removing the connector from a housing without damaging the housing is tricky, cutting the wire, crimping a new pin receptor and getting it back in solidly is not easy.

    It is easy to remove connector pins from the wafer housing.

    Get a piece of scrap wood and drive two small nails about an inch a part.

    IMG_1759 (resized).JPG

    Next, get your wafer into a position that you can lock in position on the two nails you just got thru hammering. You may have to disconnect/unplug several harness connectors to get the room you need. Make sure you mark everything so you know how to replace it. As you gain experience, you will almost be able to reconnect everything without evne thinking about it.

    IMG_1760 (resized).JPG

    Go to the hardware store or Walmart and get a set of small screwdrivers. Take one of those small screwdrivers and push down on the locking tang on the connector pin. At same time give a light pull on the wire. With the nails holding the connector in position, the pin will pull right out with no damage.

    IMG_1761 (resized).JPGIMG_1762 (resized).JPG

    CAUTION: I say you can do this without any damage but if you really start pushing too hard on the locking tang you will fold the connector pin up and make it not usable. With the right touch you can remove a connector pin to run some tests and then reinstall the pin when you are finished.

    #29 58 days ago
    Quoted from CUJO:

    Curious who makes the rectifier board you show in Post #1 of this thread?

    The boards shown are both original boards. I used rectifiers and heatsinks from GPS. The over sized rectifiers don't fit well mounted three in a row. So I mount two facing front and one facing back. However this requires modifying the mounting plate. This is one of the reasons I switched to using Weebly.

    IMG_0926 (resized).JPG
    IMG_0939 (resized).JPG
    IMG_0907 (resized).JPG
    IMG_0918 (resized).JPG
    IMG_3676 (resized).JPG

    The Weebly boards come with two heatsinks. The third heatsink isn't necessary. But I install the third just to make it look balanced.

    IMG_0897 (resized).JPG

    #30 58 days ago
    Quoted from HoakyPoaky:

    Can someone easily list the basic parts needed & the tools required to make this job easier? I need to do this myself in a couple weeks.

    This is one of my typical crimp connector work sessions. I attach a piece of plywood over the playfield. This protects the playfield and gives a good work surface. All the tools needed are shown. The light and glasses may not be required until you get old.

    I get my parts from GPE. He sells only top quality stuff.

    IMG_3165a (resized).jpg
    #31 58 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    I think the big problem for most is that the connectors are almost impossible to find. My globetrotters has 25 and 28 pin connectors...tough

    Almost impossible - but I'm working on that.

    I bought up a ton of these when they went LTB - about 20K of both sizes.
    25 pin versions are are hard to find but still available. Down to only about 100 of the left.
    I also bought a ton of 28 pin plugs but they sold extremely fast. None left. Working on a 20K order now.

    Tough connectors? Try those stinking edge connectors used by Gottlieb.

    Fortunately, the 8/9, 10 and 20 pin plugs used on the rectifier boards mentioned above are easy to find.
    For crimp tools - watch ebay for used HTR-2445A's. I bought one for about $20 that had a broken main spring - easy fix.
    Just checked - today there are none: Either too expensive or missing the locators.

    Ed (GPE)

    #32 58 days ago

    A cheap flat blade screwdriver will work to reuse connectors with the correct tip size. Just depress the male locking pin through the slot and remove. I have a fancy set of Snap-On terminal tools but always use this. Also Big Daddy had 28 pin connectors in stock last time I needed some.

    DSCN5385 (resized).JPG
    #33 58 days ago
    Quoted from HoakyPoaky:

    This is great information. Can someone easily list the basic parts needed & the tools required to make this job easier? I need to do this myself in a couple weeks. Rather not buy all the molex connectors, receptors, etc from multiple sites. Where is the best place to source everything?
    Like this kit?
    https://www.marcospecialties.com/pinball-parts/CKBLY

    Great Plains does occasionally close for a week at a time so that he can spend more time with his family. His store is currently closed and won't process new orders until 08/22.

    I'm just learning how to do repairs to my solid state pins, so I did the following after watching the video in post#6. I suggest going through your game and do the following:
    1. Identify which connectors you are going to replace, and identify which are 0.1" and which are 0.156". Count the number of 4 pin, 5 pin, etc. of each 0.1" and 0.156" connector that you will need.
    2. Figure out how many trifurcon connectors you need of each type. Order maybe ten extra of each type.

    So if you're replacing a 15 pin 0.156" connector that has 10 wires going into it you will need to order:
    One 15 pin molex connector
    Ten trifurcon connectors (two different types each for 0.1" and 0.156" - Choose wisely my son!)
    One keying pin

    Amazon
    Ratcheting Crimper Tool
    amazon.com link »
    Wire Strippers:
    amazon.com link »
    0.156" Header Pins (in bulk):*
    amazon.com link »
    Also order a pair of side strippers and needle nose pliers

    Great Plains Electronics:
    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=71
    0.1" Header Pins (not sold in bulk on Ebay or Amazon)
    Part# 22-28-4361
    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=68
    0.1" Connectors (2 pin to 28 pin) - Various part numbers
    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=73
    0.1" Keying pins (each new molex connector will need one keying pin)***
    Part#15-04-9209
    Buy either the 2.5 amp or 4 amp trifurcon 0.1" connectors on this page.**
    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=86
    0.156" 18-20 Trifurcon Connectors
    Part# 08-52-0113
    0.156" 22-26 Trifurcon Connectors
    Part# 08-50-0185
    0.156" Keying Plug
    Part# 15-04-0297-STRIP
    0.156" Molex brand connectors
    Various part numbers
    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=140
    Contact Extraction Tool
    Part# W-HT-1884

    *part number 26-48-1241 at Great Plains are 24 pin long strips at $1.35 each. For the price of five Great Plains 24 pin strips, you get 50 of the 40 pin strips on Amazon. You cut header pins down to size, so keep the leftovers. For example if you need a 15 row pin, cut the 40 pin to 15 pin, and have a 25 pin left. Keep cutting off the pieces that you need. This Amazon part was recommended in a forum on Facebook.
    **Can someone chime in with why to buy one over the other? Does the 4amp mean that it can handle more voltage? Which wire would you use a 2.5amp connector on vs. a 4amp connector?
    ***Keying pins (0.1" or 0.156"). These pins were inserted into the connectors in an empty row so that the Bally and Stern assembly line workers couldn't attach a connector to the wrong board and pin. Some headers on the boards have the same number of pins, but a pin is missing in a different location. If this wasn't done with the keying pin, an operator could start attaching the connectors in his new game, hook up the wrong connectors to the board and fry a board.

    #34 58 days ago

    Also a set of locking ratcheting crimpers make the job faster. A set with .100 & .156 will hold the new connector in place when you feed the freshly stripped wire into it.

    DSCN5386 (resized).JPG
    #35 58 days ago
    Quoted from tomdrum:

    Also a set of locking ratcheting crimpers make the job faster. A set with .100 & .156 will hold the new connector in place when you feed the freshly stripped wire into it.[quoted image]

    The first item that I listed doesn’t say if it works in both 0.1” and 0.156” connectors. Does anyone know?

    #36 58 days ago

    If I'm going through all the work replacing headers and connectors I don't want to use questionable parts. Even GPE has a "value line" but I only use his Molex brand.

    When I remove a crimp connector I don't try to be careful. I never re-use a connector. Once it's out I cut it off and replace it.

    #37 58 days ago
    Quoted from bluespin:

    The first item that I listed doesn’t say if it works in both 0.1” and 0.156” connectors. Does anyone know?

    Yes - That's the same crimper that I use. One set of jaws for 0.1 and the other for 0.156.

    #39 58 days ago
    Quoted from oldschoolbob:

    If I'm going through all the work replacing headers and connectors I don't want to use questionable parts. Even GPE has a "value line" but I only use his Molex brand.

    Molex brand connectors are getting hard to find in the .100 & .156 sizes. Ed's "value line" work just fine.

    #40 58 days ago
    Quoted from chaosrooster:

    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong as I'm not very familiar with early solid state electronics but I believe Great Plains Electronics carries these size connectors?
    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=68

    Sadly the unusual sizes are out of stock. Have been forever. When I broke my 28 pin connector trying to reuse it, I had to shave down a 13 and 15 and put them side by side

    #41 57 days ago
    Quoted from bluespin:

    https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/products.asp?cat=73
    Buy either the 2.5 amp or 4 amp trifurcon 0.1" connectors on this page.**
    **Can someone chime in with why to buy one over the other? Does the 4amp mean that it can handle more voltage? Which wire would you use a 2.5amp connector on vs. a 4amp connector?

    Can someone answer this question? Thanks

    #42 57 days ago
    Quoted from bluespin:

    Can someone answer this question? Thanks

    The pins rated for 4 amps will handle more *current*. Voltage and current (amps) are two separate properties of electricity.

    For example, if you have a 6 VDC circuit with only one bulb on it, let's say for simplicity's sake it might pull 0.10 amps. If you add 9 more bulbs to the circuit for a total of 10 bulbs, they would all pull 1 amp. So, if you add devices to a circuit, the voltage won't change, but the amount of electricity being drawn will increase since there are more devices that need to be powered. If you put too many devices on a circuit that it isn't rated to handle, then fuses will blow or things will start burning.

    So, that said, if you have a lot of power being drawn on a circuit, you may want a pin that has a higher amperage rating. You could always use the amperage setting on your mulitmeter to measure it to see if it's necessary.

    But generally, when .100" pins are used, the current draw isn't typically very high. Typically, if there is a lot of power being drawn, the gauge of the wire is increased, and .156" connectors are used.

    #43 57 days ago

    That is a brilliant rule of thumb. Thanks

    #44 55 days ago

    Thank you for this post, OP, it is much needed and much easier than piecing information together from multiple sources.

    #45 55 days ago

    This is also good info on electricity. Voltage = EMF = Electro-Magnetic Force.

    Electricity explained (resized).jpg
    #46 54 days ago

    To all: can anyone tell me the amount of and type (pin count, .100 or .156) in a Bally Night Rider?

    Even if it's close it would be appreciated, going to order up through GPE.

    #47 53 days ago

    I have a similar question. On my Globetrotters, the display connectors are flaky. Does anyone know what size connectors to get for them?

    IMG_4666 (resized).jpg
    #49 53 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    I have a similar question. On my Globetrotters, the display connectors are flaky. Does anyone know what size connectors to get for them?[quoted image]

    They're .156" size. Not .100".

    #50 53 days ago
    Quoted from mark532011:

    I have a similar question. On my Globetrotters, the display connectors are flaky. Does anyone know what size connectors to get for them?[quoted image]

    Two of the displays on my Strikes & Spares were strobing. I fixed them by reflowing the header pins on the displays.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 25.50
    $ 18.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    From: $ 9.00
    Electronics
    nvram.weebly.com
    From: $ 9.99
    $ 35.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 10.00
    Cabinet - Other
    Docquest Pinball Mods
    $ 20.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 74.00
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Id Rather Play Pinball
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 49.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    pinballmod
    $ 10.00
    Cabinet Parts
    Flashinstinct
    $ 269.00
    Displays
    Boston Pinball Company
    $ 38.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    £ 39.00
    Lighting - Led
    PinballToys
    $ 999.00
    Flipper Parts
    Mircoplayfields
    $ 7,500.00
    Pinball Machine
    Great American Pinball
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 107.95
    Lighting - Other
    Hookedonpinball.com
    $ 99.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 99.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 95.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    There are 125 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 3.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside