(Topic ID: 176412)

Advice sought for redoing game room / basement


By Nokoro

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 70 posts
  • 27 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by poppapin
  • Topic is favorited by 10 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 39 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    IMG_7778 (resized).JPG
    GameRoom2 (resized).JPG
    GameRoom1 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1576 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1575 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1589 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1588 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1587 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1585 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1581 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1580 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1579 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1584 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1577 (resized).JPG
    PinstoBed (resized).JPG
    BasementTVLocation (resized).JPG

    There are 70 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 2 years ago

    Hi all. My wife and I decided that our Spring renovation project will be redoing the basement / game room. As we progress, I'll document our progress here. We need to do this on a bit of a budget, but we plan on hiring a contractor. I would like to get some advice from others on certain ideas I have. First, here are some pictures of the existing space:

    IMG_1026 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1027 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1032 (resized).JPG
    IMG_1029 (resized).JPG

    One key aspect to this is making it much easier to get pins in and out. It is very difficult to get pins down there, and I have yet to try to get one out. First, the door leading to the basement is only 29" wide which means that the backbox just barely squeaks by with about 1/4-1/2" on each side to spare. Then, when you get the pin down the stairs, the banister is in the way making it difficult to get the pin into the basement. We have had to slide the pin in a vertical position on piece of cardboard on the carpet and past the banister. I would like to widen the door leading to the basement and eliminate a section of the banister on the left so that you can pivot a pin more easily into the room.

    Next, ceiling height is a problem. With the ceiling tiles on, you can't lift a playfield. You will see that in the area where I keep my pins, I have removed the ceiling tiles and hung some fabric to shield the pipes and electrical wires. I'm thinking about removing all of the tiles and painting everything black. I've seen some people do this for their game rooms. Can you paint over copper water pipes? Is there anything you need to be careful about when doing this. mustangpaul I've heard you mention that you have done this. Any advice? Also, if I do something like that, what lighting options should I consider?

    I also want to do something about the flooring. The carpet has to go, but what to replace it with? I wouldn't mind gaining another 1/2" or so in height by replacing it with something that sits lower. I've heard some people mention resin flooring. Does anyone have any experience with that? I wonder if I go that route, whether I can have half the room done with resin while the pins sit in the other half. Then, move them and do the unfinished half. In other words, I would rather not bring the pins upstairs for this renovation. If not resin, what are some other good flooring options.

    I think those are my immediate questions. I'll post back with more and with progress once we start. I appreciate any feedback. Thanks!

    #2 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I'm thinking about removing all of the tiles and painting everything black.

    That will definitely make the space feel larger. I was going to suggest this. If you're going to replace the floors, just get some dry-fall paint and don't worry even if it gets on the carpet.

    #3 2 years ago

    For lighting, if you do ceiling lighting, keep the light fixtures behind where the players would stand to avoid reflective glare. If you want a light directly over the pins to work on them, put those on a separate switch. I'm going to be doing a massive basement renovation soon too. The lighting in my pin area will be swap boxes with translites in them and a few neon lights ... all behind or next to the players (sideways) to keep the glare down.

    #4 2 years ago

    Noroco, can you post a basic drawing of the layout? for the stairs , on the upper part of the stairway consider a barn door sliding system ( if you have the room for it to slide over) have a look here https://rusticahardware.com/ then you can remove the onld door and blow out the opening. they have so many great choices and are all DIY easy. if the doorway is in or close to your kitchen area you will easily find something to compliment the surrounding areas and your Mrs will love it.
    where the stairs exit in the basement , consider a landing , i would build a landing up to the 2nd stair, from the stair all the way to the wall and then add a stair to each side , i have added a very crude drawing to help explain. the black lines show where you would be able to cut back the existing rail walls. red line is the landing , and blue would be the added on stairs. i would think it would make turning at the bottom much easier , but only you would really know if it would be functional based on the current layout.

    stair edit (resized).jpg

    #5 2 years ago

    Black painted ceilings look good if you have low headroom.

    #6 2 years ago
    Quoted from ls1chris:

    Noroco, can you post a basic drawing of the layout? for the stairs , on the upper part of the stairway consider a barn door sliding system ( if you have the room for it to slide over) have a look here https://rusticahardware.com/ then you can remove the onld door and blow out the opening. they have so many great choices and are all DIY easy. if the doorway is in or close to your kitchen area you will easily find something to compliment the surrounding areas and your Mrs will love it.
    where the stairs exit in the basement , consider a landing , i would build a landing up to the 2nd stair, from the stair all the way to the wall and then add a stair to each side , i have added a very crude drawing to help explain. the black lines show where you would be able to cut back the existing rail walls. red line is the landing , and blue would be the added on stairs. i would think it would make turning at the bottom much easier , but only you would really know if it would be functional based on the current layout.

    Here are some basic drawings -- not really to scale. Double line indicates a door. Here is the upstairs layout:

    Upstairs layout (resized).png

    As you can see, there is a hallway on one side of the stairs (arrow shows downward direction) and a living room on the other. I love the idea of a sliding door, but I'm not sure how it would look sliding into a room instead of along a wall.

    Here is the downstairs layout. Your idea for a landing is right on, I think.

    Downstairs layout (resized).png

    #7 2 years ago
    Quoted from KingBW:

    For lighting, if you do ceiling lighting, keep the light fixtures behind where the players would stand to avoid reflective glare. If you want a light directly over the pins to work on them, put those on a separate switch. I'm going to be doing a massive basement renovation soon too. The lighting in my pin area will be swap boxes with translites in them and a few neon lights ... all behind or next to the players (sideways) to keep the glare down.

    Thanks. Yes, light placement will be key. Right now, as you can see from the photo, I have a lamp pole with lamps pointing right at WOZ over the player's shoulder and to the right. WOZ has such bad GI, that I did this rather than add a kit. It works great. I like the idea of having a service light over the pins on a separate switch.

    Quoted from Pahuffman:

    That will definitely make the space feel larger. I was going to suggest this. If you're going to replace the floors, just get some dry-fall paint and don't worry even if it gets on the carpet.

    Thanks. Can you do this right on copper pipes and such?

    #8 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I love the idea of a sliding door, but I'm not sure how it would look sliding into a room instead of along a wall.

    i would do a sliding door so it would slide to the left over the hallway entrance, it would look out of place / poorly thought out going into the living room. i recently finished my basement i'll post a link for inspiration.

    #9 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Thanks. Can you do this right on copper pipes and such?

    Yes, but copper and PVC pipes need to be primed before they're painted or they will eventually start chipping like crazy.

    #11 2 years ago

    We used a polyurethane coating on the concrete floor (FYI radiant floor heating is great). Easy to keep clean. Rubber feet on the pin legs prevents scratching.
    The pic shows the floor if you zoom in.

    IMG_3753 (resized).JPG

    #12 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    Here is the downstairs layout. Your idea for a landing is right on, I think.

    Or ... make the stairs go down from the other direction. It looks like you could put a door at the other side of the stair well ... or does the other side go upstairs? If you turn it around, you could also add a bar height shelf where the door was for nick-nacks. Just a thought. If you can't switch the stairs around, go with the landing idea.

    #13 2 years ago

    I remember reading other mega build threads where there were lots of discussions about power; amount, placement of outlets, what's on a switch or not (turn on/off all pins at once) etc. Be sure to consider those factors as well. It's one that may come back to bite you if you don't plan well.

    #14 2 years ago

    Polyaspartic flooring with a blacked out ceiling for a tripy look. The pic with beads is mine

    IMG_2094 (resized).JPG

    IMG_1466 (resized).JPG

    IMG_2095 (resized).PNG

    #15 2 years ago
    Quoted from Pahuffman:

    Yes, but copper and PVC pipes need to be primed before they're painted or they will eventually start chipping like crazy.

    Got it. Thanks.

    Quoted from KingBW:

    Or ... make the stairs go down from the other direction. It looks like you could put a door at the other side of the stair well ... or does the other side go upstairs? If you turn it around, you could also add a bar height shelf where the door was for nick-nacks. Just a thought. If you can't switch the stairs around, go with the landing idea.

    No way to switch the stairs for the reasons you said. Plus, I want to keep the costs reasonably under control. I have a feeling switching the direction of stairs would cost more than the whole game room by itself.

    #16 2 years ago
    Quoted from BrewinBombers:

    I remember reading other mega build threads where there were lots of discussions about power; amount, placement of outlets, what's on a switch or not (turn on/off all pins at once) etc. Be sure to consider those factors as well. It's one that may come back to bite you if you don't plan well.

    Yep. Thanks. Right now I have 3 pins. I can't see me having more than 4, even with the redo. But, you never know, and I might as well build in the right electrical set up now.

    #17 2 years ago
    Quoted from Reidyb3:

    We used a polyurethane coating on the concrete floor (FYI radiant floor heating is great). Easy to keep clean. Rubber feet on the pin legs prevents scratching.
    The pic shows the floor if you zoom in.

    Quoted from presqueisle:

    Polyaspartic flooring with a blacked out ceiling for a tripy look. The pic with beads is mine

    Those look great. Do you guys recall how the cost compared to more traditional flooring? Also, is that something where you can do half of the floor, let it cure, move the pins on it, and then do the other half? Or do you have to do everything all at once?

    #18 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    No way to switch the stairs for the reasons you said. Plus, I want to keep the costs reasonably under control. I have a feeling switching the direction of stairs would cost more than the whole game room by itself.

    correct, this would be involving structural engineering to re-design the point load of the existing upper floor , huge undertaking, could do a small elevator for almost the same $$$

    #19 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    First, the door leading to the basement is only 29" wide which means that the backbox just barely squeaks by with about 1/4-1/2" on each side to spare. Then, when you get the pin down the stairs, the banister is in the way making it difficult to get the pin into the basement.

    All I hear is "they fit!"

    #20 2 years ago

    I'm liking ls1chris's landing idea more and more. If I did it from the 2nd step, I would still have 67" height clearance. I would then have plenty of room to rotate the pin and steer it down two steps on the sides to get to the bottom. Heck, I could probably get a NIB pin down there still in the box! Right now, I have to unbox them upstairs.

    #21 2 years ago

    +1 For Epoxy floor. I could be talked into a Reclaimed wood luxury vinyl tile too tho.

    #22 2 years ago

    I would do a acid etch floor they can look amazing

    #23 2 years ago
    Quoted from Flato:

    I would do a acid etch floor they can look amazing

    Wow! The pictures I see of that look great. I wonder how that compares price wise to resin.

    The other thing I should mention is that, right now, my floor is uneven so that I have to put the back legs of the pins on a cut of wood to properly level them. Would using resin or pouring new concrete level the floor? I would think so as liquids would tend to naturally level.

    #24 2 years ago

    It takes work to make a floor level. There is "self leveling" concrete, but it's... inconsistent in my experience. Given that this is a basement, I would suggest a concrete finish like acid etching etc above and fixing the floor to make water go towards a drain. I've had too many water problems in a basement to do anything else.

    #25 2 years ago
    Quoted from BrewinBombers:

    It takes work to make a floor level. There is "self leveling" concrete, but it's... inconsistent in my experience. Given that this is a basement, I would suggest a concrete finish like acid etching etc above and fixing the floor to make water go towards a drain. I've had too many water problems in a basement to do anything else.

    Interesting. I would have thought anything that flowed would naturally self level. I guess there is enough internal tension to have it retain some form as it hardens.

    #26 2 years ago

    Another couple of questions for you guys.

    First, I'm wondering if I can fit 4 pins in the space I am considering. It is 124" across. A pin back box is almost 29" at its widest point. So, I'm thinking I could fit them with about 2-2.5" of space between the heads (assuming I don't want to press one completely up against the wall). Do you think that is doable, or is there some reason why I would need more space between the pins? I will have more space at the point of the flipper buttons given the shape.

    Second, if any of you guys have some decent picks of a ceiling with all the joists and pipes and ducts painted black, my wife would love to see some to convince her that this will look ok. Please post any decent picks. I'm also interested in seeing your lighting arrangements in those circumstances. I can also scour the gameroom pics thread, but I thought I would check here first.

    Thanks!

    #27 2 years ago

    In my previous house, we had a basement with a low ceiling and exposed joists (and pipes etc) that we painted matte black. I was very skeptical, but it was a great solution. It showed dust and spiderwebs a lot, but otherwise great. I'll see if I can dig up a pic.

    #28 2 years ago

    Painted my rental house game room as you describe with deep purple accents and used maroon curtains against the bare cement walls-- I'll dig up some pics. Super cheap option and the black makes it look so much better! Low ceilings are such a pita with pins, at our new house I can't put toppers up although I have just enough clearance to lift play fields which is key

    #29 2 years ago

    Neons! Neons! Neons!

    IMG_5630 (resized).JPG

    #30 2 years ago
    Quoted from Flato:

    I would do a acid etch floor they can look amazing

    True and if the basement floods it will be fine. Standing on concrete for long periods of time is very fatiguing though. Also, this is not very noise absorbent which is a concern if you play machines after others go to bed as well as general noise levels in the room.

    #31 2 years ago
    Quoted from dung:

    Standing on concrete for long periods of time is very fatiguing though. Also, this is not very noise absorbent which is a concern if you play machines after others go to bed as well as general noise levels in the room.

    Do you know if a resin floor is any better in those respects?

    #32 2 years ago

    I'm working on my game room right now too, doing way more than I expected to (long story short, 130 year old mortar holds up terribly it turns out!), but I think the biggest bang for your buck...

    Track lighting.

    Turn it to where you need it if you're repairing a machine. Move it around if you shuffle your machines around and get a glare. Add more to it if it's too little. Take away if it's too much.

    It can be a pain to install, but it's the nicest thing once done.

    I have a really tall ceiling, but the game room is going to be in the lower level of my duplex, so sound containment is key. I am going to be installing insulation (which it needs anyway), followed by a layer of mass loaded vinyl, followed by 2 by 2s on the rafters painted place with track lighting and the outlets attached to them.

    I don't expect a perfect sound barrier, but I think it will be pretty nice! Once I confirm the walls aren't leaking, I'm going to get commercial carpet squares for the floor. I have used them before and I love them.

    IMAG1484 (resized).jpg

    #33 2 years ago
    Quoted from goatdan:

    but I think the biggest bang for your buck...
    Track lighting.
    Turn it to where you need it if you're repairing a machine. Move it around if you shuffle your machines around and get a glare. Add more to it if it's too little. Take away if it's too much.
    It can be a pain to install, but it's the nicest thing once done.

    I was thinking about track lighting as a good solution for the reasons you say.

    #34 2 years ago

    Only caution I can throw out there after trying acid etching before going all in on a raised floor with Delta FL as a water barrier below the tongue and groove OSB (a woodgrain luxury vinyl over the top), is to be certain the cement is impeccably clean. We discovered the former owner had let the their pets do their business wherever on the floor and while it had been scrubbed and buffed and no visible stains were apparent, when we applied the acid coloring, blotches started appearing that we couldn't camouflage.
    I can also confirm that a black ceiling in a low heard room basement does wonders for making the room seem bigger. The ceiling simply disappears, especially if you can keep your lighting direct where you need it and low everywhere else. If funds allow, a Lutron Grafik Eye multizone dimmer can go a long way in the cool factor department.

    #35 2 years ago

    I somehow failed to take good pictures of the basement pre and after painting.. but these couple give you an idea of how it changes... the black paint just totally hides the ceiling joists honestly, and if you go with some colored lighting like the blue in the photo, it's hidden even further when playing.

    PB143177 (resized).JPG

    P1013452 (resized).JPG

    P1013451 (resized).JPG

    #36 2 years ago

    If I was in your shoes I would just update the space and use the extra coin to buy more pins. It does not look that bad and in my opinion it just needs paint, some new ceiling tiles and new carpet. You would be surprised how just paint and new plush carpet will transform your space. Even the wainscoting looks nice and I would re-purpose and paint it white with a nice darker color above(check out Benjamin Moore Silver Gray) and add some nice 5" trim at bottom. Then I would fix the ceiling tiles and spray the entire ceiling white so you do not see the grids (you could spray closet doors white at same time), and maybe install color changing LED lighting going around corners to give it a game room feel(very cheap on Amazon). I also wrapped my support post in some color changing LED strips and it looks good. Finally comes the replacement of the carpet, I would choose a thick plush pad and some nice thick carpet(Mohawk,Stainmaster). It helps with fatigue and back pain and it is pleasant to walk on. You can play pinball for a long time before fatigue sets in. It also looks nice and it acts as a filter for dust and pollen. Do not take off tiles and leave the ceiling exposed. I think it looks like crap and I often think when I see an exposed ceiling in a finished basement-well it looks like they did not have enough money in their budget to do it right with finished drywall. Honestly the tiles look ok and I would not mess with it unless you plan on being in the home for a long time. As for the stair landing, just leave it as is. It meets code and it will be a pain moving the pins into the basement, but two people should be able to lift over the rail with no problem. I have the same issue. For uneven concrete you can purchase self-leveling concrete patch at Home Depot and it works well for minor leveling issues. The carpet and pad also help hide uneven flooring issues. Here is an example of carpet color and paint color. Again if you paint the wainscoting bright white-this color scheme will pop. Good Luck!

    Mohawk Carpet-Plush.jpg
    Benjamin Moore Silver Gray.jpg

    #37 2 years ago
    Quoted from pinmister:

    If I was in your shoes I would just update the space and use the extra coin to buy more pins. It does not look that bad and in my opinion it just needs paint, some new ceiling tiles and new carpet. You would be surprised how just paint and new plush carpet will transform your space. Even the wainscoting looks nice and I would re-purpose and paint it white with a nice darker color above(check out Benjamin Moore Silver Gray) and add some nice 5" trim at bottom. Then I would fix the ceiling tiles and spray the entire ceiling white so you do not see the grids (you could spray closet doors white at same time), and maybe install color changing LED lighting going around corners to give it a game room feel(very cheap on Amazon). I also wrapped my support post in some color changing LED strips and it looks good. Finally comes the replacement of the carpet, I would choose a thick plush pad and some nice thick carpet(Mohawk,Stainmaster). It helps with fatigue and back pain and it is pleasant to walk on. You can play pinball for a long time before fatigue sets in. It also looks nice and it acts as a filter for dust and pollen. Do not take off tiles and leave the ceiling exposed. I think it looks like crap and I often think when I see an exposed ceiling in a finished basement-well it looks like they did not have enough money in their budget to do it right with finished drywall. Honestly the tiles look ok and I would not mess with it unless you plan on being in the home for a long time. As for the stair landing, just leave it as is. It meets code and it will be a pain moving the pins into the basement, but two people should be able to lift over the rail with no problem. I have the same issue. For uneven concrete you can purchase self-leveling concrete patch at Home Depot and it works well for minor leveling issues. The carpet and pad also help hide uneven flooring issues. Here is an example of carpet color and paint color. Again if you paint the wainscoting bright white-this color scheme will pop. Good Luck!

    Thanks. I appreciate the thoughts. Unfortunately, my ceiling tiles are just incompatible with pins. They are too low, and I can't lift the playfield. That is why I removed them in that one area and hung cloth to conceal the pipes. But, cloth isn't a long term solution. I think to fit an eventual 4th pin in, I need to move the pins to a different area which means removing more ceiling tiles. I believe I'll be better off just removing them for the whole basement and painting everything on the ceiling black.

    As for carpet vs. concrete vs. resin, I hear you. I suppose I could always get some area rugs and put them in front of the pins if standing becomes too tiring.

    As for the stair landing, while it is possible moving pins in (and, I assume, out, even though I haven't done it), it is a royal pain and scares me to death. To move WOZ in, I paid a little extra for delivery and set up. Even then, I nearly had a heart attack watching the two delivery guys, who were great, bring the pin into the basement. I just want it to be a bit easier.

    At the end of the day, this is going to come down to budget. For the next couple of months, my wife and I will be gathering ideas, talking to contractors, and getting a preliminary feel for cost. In March / April, I find out what type of bonus I will be getting and how much the IRS plans to take or give. I'll then have a better idea for what we can spend and may have to tailor our plans accordingly or do things in stages.

    I appreciate all of the suggestions I've gotten so far in this thread. I would love to see more pictures with the black ceilings when people have time. And, I would still love to hear from people who have done the resin thing -- pros, cons, and how it exactly works.

    #38 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I would love to see more pictures with the black ceilings when people have time.

    I have been a fan of ramegoom's space. See pictures attached to his profile:

    https://pinside.com/pinball/community/pinsiders/ramegoom/stories/ramegoom

    #39 2 years ago

    We recently did what you're describing with the black ceiling paint (pro tip: don't use strictly flat black, pick a shade of black which has some of the wall colour in it). Our walls have the tiniest bit of green and blue in it, though it's predominantly grey. The slightly lighter shade of black with a touch of green makes the ceiling disappear as has been noted, but the way the light reflects off the walls makes it feel "warmer" and the black paint doesn't seem as dirty/dusty. I also have low ceilings so this was key.

    Absolutely absolutely absolutely have a contractor do the painting and make sure they use contractor grade paint (e.g. Sherwin Williams 200 or 400), it is significantly better wearing and thicker than crap from lowes or HD. Sherwin Williams will not sell their high end paints to regular customer, so you need someone with an account there.

    We laid down vinyl plank flooring with an underlayment and man is that better than concrete or tile! Softer quieter and still looks good (until it got hella scratched taking my old TAF out of there...)

    FWIW I also built a little platform I could put between the last step and the wall, effectively raising it to the level of the 2nd step which lets us pivot and rotate a pin without scratching the hell out of the floor or steps. It gives us a wider base for turns (can get a wide body up and down with no issue) and one less step to go up and down with the dolly!

    3 weeks later
    #40 2 years ago

    Hi all. Just an update. We met with the first of several contractors today to talk about what we would like to do. He had no experience with resin flooring, and I think it would probably be difficult to find someone in this area with that experience. He said he would look into it but also recommended carpet or Pergo. I think if we remove the ceiling tiles, I can live with the slight added height of a carpet.

    What are people's thoughts on the advantages of carpet vs. resin flooring?

    We've used Pergo in other rooms in our house. Have people done it with a game room with pins, and are there advantages or disadvantages?

    Also, he thought painting the open ceiling a gray color would look better and more open than matte black. Anyone have any thoughts about that?

    Thanks!

    #41 2 years ago

    I would never (again) put carpet in a basement unless I had a great water abatement solution (drain tile, redundant sump etc). Same for Pergo. One small leak and you're flushing a lot of money down the toilet. I would recommend going with someone else who can do what you want or go with etching / staining of the concrete.

    Again, I did a matte black ceiling in our old basement. Going with grey doesn't seem like an improvement.

    #42 2 years ago

    Hells no on the grey ceiling. The whole point to the black is you do not notice it and can't see it . Wanna run cables later you can spray paint them black and disappear. Put in a new electrical box, paint it black. It's great.

    I like carpet personally but just personal preference

    Hate to disagree with rdoyle but I specifically asked for the cheapest Godamn paint they had. They said they had some super cheap shit that people building sets for community theatre use if I did it again though I would rent a real paint sprayer for the day and bang it out and be done

    #43 2 years ago

    Thanks guys. Yeah, I was guessing that no one would favor gray for the ceiling. Just thought I would mention it since the contractor suggested it.

    As for water damage, we've never really had a basement water problem. Even when there were flood like conditions in the area, our basement was relatively dry. Of course, now that I've said that, I've doomed myself.

    I love the look of some of the resin floors I've seen. I just think it may be a bit risky unless I find someone who really knows what they are doing and can explain the options.

    #44 2 years ago

    A great solution I think is commercial floor tiles.

    Make sure to get the ones that are rubbery on the bottom and made to be water resistant. In my previous house, I installed a bunch in the basement. They would get really wet. I would lift them up, tilt them to the side, the water would fall off and they would be good to go with absolutely no damage after a few days. This was no different than when I used them at a commercial place, when they got really dirty we would take them out back, hose them off, hang them to dry and then put them back.

    On top of that, the height they add is minimal, and you can do lots of fun and funky designs with them. I did lined in an alternating pattern and it looked amazing.

    You can buy these from different places online. I bought mine from the local Hobo in town. When my current basement project gets a closer to done, I plan on going to Hobo, buying like 20 boxes of carpet tile, and just making funky patterns with them.

    #45 2 years ago

    Ceramic tile? It adds maybe 3/8".

    #46 2 years ago
    Quoted from KingBW:

    Ceramic tile? It adds maybe 3/8".

    I love ceramic tile, but we used to have it in our kitchen. Every time we dropped a glass, it shattered into a thousand pieces. Since we want to install a bar in the basement as well, I'm not sure it would be the best choice.

    Been looking online and seeing some Pergo grey laminate wood flooring. I think that could look really slick down there.

    #47 2 years ago
    Quoted from Nokoro:

    I love ceramic tile, but we used to have it in our kitchen. Every time we dropped a glass, it shattered into a thousand pieces. Since we want to install a bar in the basement as well, I'm not sure it would be the best choice.
    Been looking online and seeing some Pergo grey laminate wood flooring. I think that could look really slick down there.

    Like this? It was affordable. Got it from Lumber Liquidators on closeout.

    20160525_121553 (resized).jpg

    #48 2 years ago
    Quoted from Agent_Hero:

    Like this? It was affordable. Got it from Lumber Liquidators on closeout.

    Yes! Exactly that style. We're thinking of even having a similar wall color as you, with perhaps a red accent wall behind the bar. Still all just possibilities at this point, but I like that style.

    #49 2 years ago

    Talked to another contractor today who has experience with resin floors. He likes them but noted that they take a long time to do, create a lot of moisture and let off a pretty strong odor. He noted the lack of ventilation in the basement and said we would have to close off the area from our cats. I think that makes it too difficult. We're probably settling on a laminate like Pergo.

    #50 2 years ago

    I have carpet, warm feet and less fatigue. The pins are on carpet sliders which makes them easy to move around. Also this is a forgiving solution if your floor isn't super flat.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 20.00
    Cabinet - Other
    Apron Envy
    $ 26.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 149.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 62.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 65.00
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    Texas Pinball
    From: $ 5,799.99
    $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 99.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 109.99
    From: $ 99.99
    Cabinet - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 17.00
    Electronics
    Yorktown Parts and Equip
    $ 45.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Whitewater pinball mods
    $ 14.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ULEKstore
    $ 99.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 225.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Pinball Mod Co.
    $ 175.00
    Lighting - Interactive
    Professor Pinball
    $ 75.00
    $ 29.00
    $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Little Shop Of Games
    $ 5,599.00
    Pinball Machine
    Little Shop Of Games
    $ 24.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ULEKstore
    $ 96.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 7,499.00
    Pinball Machine
    Gulf Coast Pinball, LLC
    $ 42.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    There are 70 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside