(Topic ID: 296583)

Adjusting rollover switch

By arsmith7

3 years ago


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Topic Stats

  • 12 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 10 months ago by ALY
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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    #1 3 years ago

    I just got an NBA Fastbreak and a couple of the rollovers were errors in the test report. Inspected a little and it seems like the wire above the play field isn’t pushing down far enough to close the switch.

    Is there a good method to adjust/bend the wire to promote more force? Or can the switch be adjusted from under the play field to require less?

    I’m sure this is a simple fix but my slight bends of the wire thus far seem to only fix the issue for a very short time.

    #2 3 years ago

    Needle nose pliers is probably the best tool to tweak microswitch actuators. Remove the switch from the playfield before adjusting. Compare the bend in the actuator to other similar nearby working switches and adjust accordingly.

    Keep in mind that new switches are cheap. So if there's any question, just buy new ones.

    2 years later
    #3 10 months ago

    I experiece the same issue. After "fixing" it with bending and adjusting the switch to click nicely when a ball rolls over, it only works fine for a couple of games.
    Is there a way to properly fix this or is a switch with this problem always going to go bad quick?
    What is your experience with this?

    #4 10 months ago
    Quoted from ALY:

    I experiece the same issue. After "fixing" it with bending and adjusting the switch to click nicely when a ball rolls over, it only works fine for a couple of games.

    If you are bending the arm of the switch, and not the flat part that pushes the knob into the switch, I'd try a new switch.

    LTG : )

    #5 10 months ago

    Well, I tried both and it works ok, just doesn't last long.
    That's why I wanted to hear what others' experience is.

    #6 10 months ago

    Buy a new switch and then break open the old switch. I think you will find dirt and pitting of the contacts - at least on the ones I've opened. You can get them to work for awhile, but you will always find yourself going back to that switch, which is why everyone says to replace it.

    #7 10 months ago

    Thanks for the answer.
    So basically it's the dirt that's hard to get out that makes it stop working soon after?

    #8 10 months ago

    Yes, and I think the dirt comes from arcing, which causes the putting, which causes poorer contact, which causes arcing, etc., etc.

    We’re talking very small arcs that build up over time. At least, that’s my theory - others can give their opinions. Also, I don’t know why one switch will have a problem, while others never seem to have a problem.

    #9 10 months ago

    Black microswitches fail. My superstitious friend Gary said he would 'reverse the terminals' on pinball coin switches on the theory that the current is flowing one direction, and it might be transferring (like electroplating) some of the gold from one side of the internal switch contacts to the other side. Reversing the contacts causes the electroplating to go the other way.

    Yeah.

    Lots of superstition.

    Fact of the matter is that when a black microswitch goes dodgy, you need to replace it.

    I personally find more problems with premature failure of black microswitches where there is EXTREME vibration. (I'm thinking of the LOTR switches with the 'Y' activators, Data East ball trough switches as well as microswitches used on single drop targets and ball poppers).

    But I also replace a lot of spinner and ramp microswitches.

    Pulling these apart and spraying with contact cleaner doesn't gain you much time (though I've done this while machines are on the route and I didn't have a replacement with me). So I'm suspecting something more like fractional mis-alignment due to mechanical wear than corrosion or tarnish on the switch contacts. I hadn't thought about microscopic pitting. That's a good point.

    #10 10 months ago

    I think the physical rubbing is probably the cause of the wear. I know on problematic ones I have replaced them with leaf switches as they are easier to adjust, especially on gates that can go both ways. (Earthshaker 6 loop - micro went bad, replaced with like micro, couldn't get consistent results left/right. Changed to leaf switch, easy to adjust since you can see the contacts at all gate position points).

    A cursory google search of microswitch manufacturer FAQ says most failure is physical in nature. They are cheap to replace (and cheap, for sure..... quality definitely varies.... I have wpc machines running with all original micros and they are fine, then newer wpc95 machines that multiples switches have failed and needed to be replaced.)

    #11 10 months ago

    Or replace them with a contactless MRS and be done forever! Shameless plug....

    Matt & Dan
    M&M Creations

    #12 10 months ago

    Interesting outcomes. Thank you all for your inputs.

    That "superstition" method of reversing the terminals becauce the current is flowing one direction, and it might be electroplating some of the gold from one side of the internal switch contacts to the other side, is something that might be worth trying or exploring the myth behind it.

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