(Topic ID: 142648)

Accidentally bridged two solder points - what should I do?


By S0RRY

4 years ago



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  • 18 posts
  • 11 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 years ago by Homer714
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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There have been 4 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

20151029_141148.jpg
board3.png
board1.png
board2.png

#1 4 years ago

I was replacing the flipper relay on my Williams Cyclone MPU, and I accidentally seem to have bridged two of the solder points. How should I go about repairing this? Please, forgive my soldering, I know it's not pretty. I'm still getting the hang of it.

After sucking the solder off of the existing relay:

board1.PNG

After re-soldering the new one in:

board2.PNG

Thanks for your help!

#2 4 years ago

Since they are on the same trace, I'd leave them alone. You may make things worse trying to clean it up.

LTG : )™

#3 4 years ago

Those traces look like they should be bridged.

#4 4 years ago

It sure looks like they're running along a trace (that lighter green line) in which case they were already connected.

EDIT: There seems to be a consensus.

#5 4 years ago

I was wondering that, but wanted to be sure before powering the machine on. Thank you all!

#6 4 years ago

As the others have said there's no problem regarding the "bridge." Do you have a higher res photo, some of those solder joints look like they may be cold (could just be shadows).

#7 4 years ago

I just reinstalled the board in the machine, so no pictures at the moment. However, I think you might be right as it's acting even stranger than before. I will pull the board out again and redo any of the joints that are cold or otherwise misformed. I'll update this thread with a photo for reference also.

Thanks again!

#9 4 years ago

Thanks for the guide terryb! I've reviewed it but based on these photos, it's clear there's more to it than just reading. I'm embarrassed to post these, but here they are:

board3.PNG

#10 4 years ago

your soldering looks fine, just clean the flux off.

#11 4 years ago
Quoted from ls1chris:

your soldering looks fine, just clean the flux off.

My thoughts exactly.

#12 4 years ago

Is flux the debris/dots? If so, I cleaned that up with a small bit of rubbing alcohol after the picture was taken. Thank you!

#13 4 years ago

In general looks good--nothing to be embarrassed about. I'm not sure about a couple in the middle, can you post a higher resolution photo, and after the flux was removed?

#14 4 years ago

Thanks everyone. Unfortunately the board is back in the machine, but if it comes out again I'll take a picture. Appreciate the help!

#15 4 years ago
Quoted from S0RRY:

Is flux the debris/dots? If so, I cleaned that up with a small bit of rubbing alcohol after the picture was taken. Thank you!

Flux is the stuff that looks like syrup and is very sticky

#16 4 years ago

Be careful using rubbing alcohol, as it usually contains skin conditioning ingredients such as lanolin and aloe, which can leave an undesired residue behind. Much better to use 91% (the maximum purity possible with distillation) isopropanol as it will evaporate much more cleanly (pharmacies have it). You can also use commercially available flux remover sprays (Techspray is my preference); they are a bit more expensive but they are anhydrous, do a more thorough job, and evaporate more quickly.

Your solder connections look perfectly fine, BTW.

For future reference, the best way to fix a solder bridge is to use desoldering braid or a solder sucker. Also note that it's much easier to get a solder bridge between two adjacent pads connected by a trace than two pads which are insulated from each other. You might also consider using thinner gauge solder wire; 0.028-0.035" is probably optimal for typical pinball PCBs (my "go to" solder for nearly all through-hole PCB work is Kester #285 0.031" 63/37 - been using it a very long time, wets and flows easily and quickly, has a mildly-activated flux which is less aggressive and doesn't actually require cleaning, and I have never experienced a joint failure).

#17 4 years ago

Yup!

20151029_141148.jpg

Quoted from Thermionic:

You might also consider using thinner gauge solder wire; 0.028-0.035" is probably optimal for typical pinball PCBs (my "go to" solder for nearly all through-hole PCB work is Kester #285 0.031" 63/37

#18 4 years ago
Quoted from S0RRY:

Thanks everyone. Unfortunately the board is back in the machine, but if it comes out again I'll take a picture. Appreciate the help!

Is it working??

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