(Topic ID: 357526)

80 Years Ago Today

By LTG

37 days ago


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  • Latest reply 36 days ago by Atari_Daze
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    There are 60 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    108
    #1 37 days ago

    80 Years ago today Allied soldiers crossed the English Channel. And landed in German Festung Europa.

    Thanks will never be enough for those men.

    LTG : )

    19
    #2 37 days ago

    I have the privilege of visiting Normandy in a week. A trip I've wanted to make all my life. Years ago I had the privilege of interviewing numerous World War two veterans. I was A newspaper reporter. One of them was a veteran who landed on Point du Hoc. Amazing men amazing stories. My 30 year old daughter recently went to Normandy and said she started crying it was so overwhelming.

    #3 37 days ago
    Quoted from Triplecdad:

    I have the privilege of visiting Normandy in a week. A trip I've wanted to make all my life. Years ago I had the privilege of interviewing numerous World War two veterans. I was A newspaper reporter. One of them was a veteran who landed on Point du Hoc. Amazing men amazing stories. My 30 year old daughter recently went to Normandy and said she started crying it was so overwhelming.

    Yes!
    For any human with normal function, both Normandy and The Holy Land, can compel reactions that transcend normal human comprehension!

    #5 37 days ago

    I convinced my wife to do a day tour when we were there some years back. Her mother’s family and her cousins are French so she wasn’t too happy taking a day away from visiting them. About halfway through the tour as we walked on Omaha beach after visiting the American National Memorial Cemetery she thanked me for taking her there. My avatar here on Pinside and screen savers on my phone and iPad is a picture I took of Pointe du Hoc. Great experience and I’m sure you’ll be glad you went.

    #6 37 days ago

    Can't even fathom the sacrifice.

    31
    #7 37 days ago

    My grandfather served during WWII and received the Purple Heart. His sacrifice, along with his fellow service members, will never be forgotten.

    I was privileged to attend the French Ambassador’s residence to commemorate the 80th anniversary of D-Day and celebrate the enduring partnership between the United States and France. It was amazing to memorialize such a decisive moment in history at one of the most beautiful homes in Washington D.C.

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    #8 37 days ago

    My uncle Joe lost a leg on the beach that day. My dad was on Saipan. My aunts were all WAVES. Whole families committed to the effort back then. Bless them all.

    #9 37 days ago

    Both my grandfathers fought on the wrong side (Nazis). I'm so glad and thankful that the Allies put an end to that insanity and I understand the great cost and enormous sacrifice.

    #10 37 days ago

    A father of a friend was serving on a mine sweeper, a few bullets when by him and crew members hitting the ships wall behind him. Early morning just before the landings. Mr. Taylor did not tell stories of his service, he did share this one.

    #11 37 days ago

    I worry my kids don’t understand the gravity of this day or the war. It’s something I’m trying to figure out.

    #12 37 days ago
    Quoted from radium:

    I worry my kids don’t understand the gravity of this day or the war. It’s something I’m trying to figure out.

    Many adults have lost sight of how it changed the world.

    Prior to WWII the British Empire was the world "super power".

    They gave their lives for more than just the freedom of Europe.

    #13 37 days ago

    The Ultimate sacrifice of many of these men is a debt we will never be able to pay in full.

    Makes you wonder what would happen these days with all these : what's in it for me ? me myself and I.

    We must honor the sacrifice these men did by ending these endless battles inside our borders and see the big picture.

    I'm afraid the next enemy is not a foreign regime or power but it will be inside our countries.

    Anyway I don't want to sound negative on a day like this.

    Respect and thanks to all the families who were involved and lost so we can all benefit.

    #14 37 days ago

    Thanks to all those brave men!
    I’ll be there this summer. A trip I’ve been looking forward to for a long time.

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    #15 36 days ago

    It was not just the men who served. I mentioned that my aunts were WAVES. In addition, my mother, as a teenager, worked installing steering columns in deuce and a half trucks at the Virginia state fairgrounds. She also processed returning service members at the war's end. It was a total effort.

    11
    #16 36 days ago
    Quoted from zombywoof:

    It was not just the men who served.

    My post was about D Day itself. As far as I know, no women were involved that day with the soldiers hitting the beaches.

    Women were an important part of the war effort. Shortly after D Day women were going ashore. I would imagine as nurses and medics.

    My own mother worked on bombers. Since the bomber flights were long, they left dirty messages hidden in the plane for the crew to find when bored.

    My Father was drafted before the war. Sent to Africa, Sicily, Italy, and France. No idea if he made it into Germany. He was there the whole time. Once you hit 50 points they rotated you home. My Father had over 480 points, his Father kept track. They kept those guys, something about them kept them alive, you put a new man there and he gets shot right away.

    LTG : )

    #17 36 days ago
    Quoted from pinzrfun:

    Can't even fathom the sacrifice.

    Quoted from Darth_Chris:

    The Ultimate sacrifice of many of these men is a debt we will never be able to pay in full.

    It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived. George S. Patton.

    LTG : )

    #18 36 days ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    My post was about D Day itself. As far as I know, no women were involved that day with the soldiers hitting the beaches.
    Women were an important part of the war effort. Shortly after D Day women were going ashore. I would imagine as nurses and medics.
    My own mother worked on bombers. Since the bomber flights were long, they left dirty messages hidden in the plane for the crew to find when bored.
    LTG : )

    I get that, and no slight was implied to those that stormed the beach that day. I just wanted to acknowledge those that contributed in other ways.

    Uncle Joe lost his right leg, so he had to special order all of his cars with the pedals reversed. He liked Lincolns. He would always knock them with a rubber mallet when he bought them just to ease the stress of the inevitable door-ding.

    #19 36 days ago
    Quoted from radium:

    I worry my kids don’t understand the gravity of this day or the war. It’s something I’m trying to figure out.

    Just confiscate their phones and park them in front of saving private ryan for 3 hours, that’ll do it!

    #20 36 days ago
    Quoted from zombywoof:

    Uncle Joe lost his right leg, so he had to special order all of his cars with the pedals reversed. He liked Lincolns. He would always knock them with a rubber mallet when he bought them just to ease the stress of the inevitable door-ding.

    Bless your Uncle Joe. Sounds like the kind of man you'd like to meet.

    LTG : )

    #21 36 days ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived. George S. Patton.
    LTG : )

    Good point Lloyd

    #22 36 days ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived. George S. Patton.
    LTG : )

    Patton was right all along! We should have listened to him back then, and we wouldn’t be in such a mess now.
    Lord, Bless those fine men!
    No way I could do what they did. 18, 19, early 20s. It’s truly difficult to imagine.

    #23 36 days ago
    Quoted from LTG:

    Bless your Uncle Joe. Sounds like the kind of man you'd like to meet.
    LTG : )

    Thanks, LTG. He was a great guy and always positive. He never talked about Normandy, though. I heard from my mother that it was a landmine. My dad never talked about Saipan either. Although, one time, he referenced Japanese snipers in the trees. We owe so much to those who served.

    #28 36 days ago
    Quoted from zombywoof:

    He never talked about Normandy,

    Same with my father about his time in WW2. Bits and pieces I heard came from family or his friends.

    I do know he didn't expect to make it. He doubled his GI insurance so his folk would have something.

    My stepfather was in Germany. Making their way out of a town a mortar landed behind him. A lot of shrapnel was still in his leg bones. He wasn't supposed to ever walk again but he did recover.

    LTG : )

    #30 36 days ago
    Quoted from Isochronic_Frost:

    Patton was right all along! We should have listened to him back then, and we wouldn’t be in such a mess now.

    Patton was right about a lot of things even after the war that the powers that be back home didn't want to hear.

    #31 36 days ago

    One of the most amazing things is how America mechanized leading up to this day. Going from an isolated country that most of its citizens preferred to stay, but the politicians got their way with Pearl Harbor. We had no choice after that.

    Our armament was leftovers from WWI at best. But mechanize we did. FDR worked his magic bringing in company leaders that he had previously taken to court. They all went above and beyond after that. I find the story of Mr. Pierre du pont especially interesting. And that Kaiser dude. whoaaa

    #32 36 days ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    But mechanize we did.

    Not just for us, a lot for export as the allied armies marched across Europe. They had to rebuild roads, bridges, and railroads to keep supplies rolling.

    I always admired them man who designed railroad steam engines for export. He studied logging railroad engines. Notorious for operating under harsh conditions, poor track, lack of maintenance. He went with stuff that could take it.

    When politicians interfered with why their constituents parts weren't used ( feed water pumps, air pumps, brake shoes, gauges, throttles, etc. etc. ) he stuck to his guns. He wasn't bashful about letting them know their parts were crap and wouldn't work or last.

    Sadly a lot of people/companies tried to get rich off of the war effort. In every country.

    LTG : )

    #33 36 days ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    but the politicians got their way with Pearl Harbor. We had no choice after that.

    A lot of our thinking changed after that. Until then we were still laying down keels for battleships in early 1942, we thought the battleship was king and didn't think much of aircraft carriers. Even though Billy Mitchel in the 1920's said one plane one bomb could take out a battleship. They let him try and he proved it. They drummed him out of the service.

    And some of the thinking didn't change. Patton warned them about using gasoline to power tanks instead of diesel. Any hot shrapnel and anyone inside was toast.

    LTG : )

    #34 36 days ago

    I was going to say our aircraft carriers they missed were modern, but they did sink our battleships.

    10
    #35 36 days ago

    I'm incredibly humble and honored to be the grandson of an amazing man. He's in the middle.

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    #36 36 days ago

    All I can think about watching actual footage of the landing is
    Much more could have been done to stop those machine gunner bullets
    hitting the men.
    This was a desperate maneuver that didn't respect the human loss.
    Beach these damn ships sideways and blast the shit out of those pill boxes.
    Put available armor on those who landed.

    Sorry, hindsight is 20 20.

    #37 36 days ago
    Quoted from phil-lee:

    All I can think about watching actual footage of the landing is
    Much more could have been done to stop those machine gunner bullets
    hitting the men.
    This was a desperate maneuver that didn't respect the human loss.
    Beach these damn ships sideways and blast the shit out of those pill boxes.
    Put available armor on those who landed.
    Sorry, hindsight is 20 20.

    Damn tough to do from a distance, at least during those times. The key to success was to catch the enemy off guard and to overrun them before they could bring in reinforcements. They were sitting ducks while they were on those beaches. Stationary troops tend to get blown to bits by artillery and the enemy was too dug in to get taken out by aerial bombardment or shelling from ships.

    Anyway, I thank God for those men. It's a travesty that Saving Private Ryan didn't win Best Picture. Still pisses me off, especially today.

    #38 36 days ago

    Despite the numbers of young men who bravely jumped onto those boats and landing craft and those who parachuted in, they knew what they were in for. The sea was rough and Germans were dug in like ticks on a hound. With bunkers, big guns, and every obstacle you could imagine lining the coast.

    Why they are called the great generation.

    #39 36 days ago

    As a family doc I can't count the number of 20-25 year old males I see that are "unemployed" and seem uninterested in looking for a job these days.

    How things have changed in 80 years from 19 year old kids saving the world to 23 year old men anxious to leave their mom's basement.

    #40 36 days ago
    Quoted from phil-lee:

    Much more could have been done to stop those machine gunner bullets
    hitting the men.

    You go to war with what you have. Not what you wish you had. And you are looking at 1944 with 2024 eyes. We bombed the hell out of them. We pounded them with 16" and 14" guns on ships. And still they crawled out and fought.

    At least it wasn't like the Russians on the Eastern front, keep throwing bodies at them until they run out of bullets. We tried our best to do a dirty job.

    LTG : )

    #41 36 days ago
    Quoted from phil-lee:

    Beach these damn ships sideways and blast the shit out of those pill boxes.

    The Germans were up higher, easy to still shoot at soldiers inside the ships. No matter which way they faced.

    Quoted from phil-lee:

    Put available armor on those who landed.

    Well if it had been invented yet and produced in mass, they would have.

    LTG : )

    #42 36 days ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    I was going to say our aircraft carriers they missed were modern, but they did sink our battleships.

    At Pearl Harbor, we didn't think much of aircraft carriers. So they didn't protect them by keeping them in port lined up like the battleships. Which we thought were safe in port. Big Oops.

    That is why our aircraft carriers were out to sea playing war games, which saved them, and in the next half year we needed them dearly at the Battle of Coral Sea and at Midway.

    I had an old friend there at the time of the attack. He said we had an old battleship with the top removed and concreted over. They'd haul it out and use it for target practice. From the air it was big and flat, so the Japanese pounded the heck out of it thinking it was an aircraft carrier. No telling how many lives that saved.

    And the Japanese didn't bother with out oil bunkers, they didn't think oil was a problem for us. If they hit them, we couldn't recover oil for at least a year.

    LTG : )

    #43 36 days ago

    Imagine if our fight had only been with Japan, the ones who bombed and took aggression against us. Wouldn't it be Germany fighting with Russia now? And would Italy be able to send out more pizza? Or should I just go back out to the garage and think to myself.

    #44 36 days ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    Imagine if our fight had only been with Japan, the ones who bombed and took aggression against us. Wouldn't it be Germany fighting with Russia now?

    If it went down that way. On December 11th hitler took it upon himself to declare war on the USA.

    Russia would have still have steam rolled into Germany, just would have taken longer. And destroyed more, and kept more land.

    And our war in the Pacific probably wouldn't have been much shorter. Island hopping took time. And if we got to the mainland before the atomic bomb, the allied loss of life would have be astronomical trying to invade Japan. We were already losing 4,000 allied soldiers a day in the Pacific theater.

    And at the time we thought Germany was the bigger threat. And after September 6th 1944 when Germany first used a V rocket, against Paris. How long until they had one that could reach our East coast ? Or figure a warhead that could home in on a big mass of metal, like a supply ship ?

    You got to hope our leaders did the best they could, with what they had, and what they knew. And sharing intelligence wasn't really a thing then. If used right that could have shortened the war.

    LTG : )

    #45 36 days ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    Imagine if our fight had only been with Japan, the ones who bombed and took aggression against us. Wouldn't it be Germany fighting with Russia now? And would Italy be able to send out more pizza? Or should I just go back out to the garage and think to myself.

    Russia defeated the Germans. They lost more men and resources than the US.
    Most of the Naval resources used during D-Day were British.
    The Americans were instrumental in finishing the last major skirmishes.
    I am a Fan of the minesweepers with many coming from Barbour Boatworks in NC.

    A minesweeper at that time was made from wood, so the magnetic explosives didn't come in to play.
    Barbour made the largest wooden boat used in WW2. Or so they said.

    #46 36 days ago
    Quoted from phil-lee:

    Russia defeated the Germans. They lost more men and resources than the US.

    That's only fair. They helped start WW2. Russia signed a pact with Germany and it was on. They each grabbed half of Poland. A county France and England agreed to protect.

    And they had too much of their equipment and manpower poised to go into Europe, after the Europeans and Germany were weakened from fighting. That is why Russia lost so much in the first days of Barbarossa.

    And England stood alone for nine months, fully expecting Russia to strike them.

    And after Pearl Harbor we supplied Russia with all their light vehicles so they could concentrate on heavy things like tanks and artillery, easier to deploy there rather than ship across the Atlantic. We also supplied them with uniforms. And lots of other stuff. England started supplying them too, after June 22nd, 1941.

    It wasn't until 2010 that Russia invited allies to join in the Red Square Victory Parade March.

    LTG : )

    #47 36 days ago
    Quoted from phil-lee:

    They lost more men

    I might point out too that no military academy in the world studies or follows Marshal Zhukov's tactics. Throw bodies at the enemy until they run out of bullets. And if they tried to retreat the NKVD shot them. Stalin didn't care how many Ukrainians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Chechens, Bulgarians, Georgians, or other nationalities died to protect him.

    Marshal Zhukov is revered in Russia as a hero.

    LTG : )

    #48 36 days ago
    Quoted from phil-lee:

    Russia defeated the Germans. They lost more men and resources than the US.

    Ironic that now our supposed job is to defend a much weaker Germany and the rest of pussy whipped mainland Europe from them.

    #49 36 days ago
    Quoted from phil-lee:

    Russia defeated the Germans. They lost more men and resources than the US.
    Most of the Naval resources used during D-Day were British.
    The Americans were instrumental in finishing the last major skirmishes.
    I am a Fan of the minesweepers with many coming from Barbour Boatworks in NC.
    A minesweeper at that time was made from wood, so the magnetic explosives didn't come in to play.
    Barbour made the largest wooden boat used in WW2. Or so they said.

    Minesweepers still have wooden hulls. A good deal of the WWII ones were also built by Burger Boats in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. A lot of Gato Class submarines were also built in Manitowoc.

    If we want to talk about US-Soviet relations, a good deal of the reason the USSR took over much of Europe was because FDR caved in to most of their demands.

    Anyway, LTG, good to see you still around here. I need to make a point of getting over to your place again next time I'm in MSP.

    #50 36 days ago

    The Longest Day is a good movie version of what went down.

    There are 60 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.

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